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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier. You can also browse the collection for Robert Burns or search for Robert Burns in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 1: childhood (search)
e first abolitionists; a man whom I well remember in later years as being all that Whittier describes in him. The place where he is celebrated is in that delightful poem, To my old schoolmaster beginning Old friend, kind friend! lightly down Drop time's snowflakes on thy crown! Never be thy shadow less, Never fail thy cheerfulness! Whittier's Works, IV. 73. Coffin, then a young Dartmouth College student, used to read aloud on winter evenings, in the Whittier household, the poems of Burns, explaining the Scotch dialect; and finally lent the book to the boy of fourteen, who had heard it with delight. At a later time one of the Waverley novels came into his hands, probably by borrowing, and he and his young sister read it on the sly at bedtime, till their candle went out at a critical passage. Furthermore, he visited Boston in his teens as the guest of Mrs. Nathaniel Greene, one of his Batchelder kindred, there buying his first copy of Shakespeare, and being offered a ticket
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 7: Whittier as a social reformer (search)
to urge the most liberal aid to the suffering and starving population of the Catholic island. The severity of his language finds its ample apology in the reluctant confession of one of the most eminent Romish priests, the eloquent and devoted Father Ventura. And he added a similar reproach in The Prisoners at Naples, and in The peace of Europe, 1852. As to the temperance movement, it seems a little amusing to find Whittier taking for the theme of his first prose newspaper article, Robert Burns, and for his second subject, on the following week, Temperance. These appeared in the Haverhill Gazette, the editor of which, Mr. Thayer, father of the late Professor James B. Thayer, of the Harvard Law School, was one of the earliest American editors to take up this theme. A year later Whittier writes from Amesbury, whither he had removed: I have one item of good news from Haverhill. The old distillery has had its fires quenched at last. C. has sold out, and the building is to be co
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 9: Whittier at home (search)
ned. Mr. Whittier was very jealous of any one else tending or poking the fire. Often I have unconsciously taken the tongs to touch up a brand, when his hand would stay mine, and he would say, Thee must not touch that, it is just right, and perhaps the next minute he would have the tongs and do just what I had attempted. I have frequently gone in at twilight and found him lying on the lounge, watching the flitting shadows, and repeating aloud from some favourite author, generally Scott or Burns. His mood and conversation at such times were particularly delightful. The beautiful poem, Burning Driftwood was doubtless inspired by such experiences. Pickard, II. 745. One of the very best delineations of Whittier by one of those who approached him on the public or semi-public side is that written by the Hon. Robert S. Rantoul of Salem, Mass.:-- Mr. Whittier was self-contained. In the company of persons whom he did not care for — who could not draw him out — his mind seemed
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 12: Whittier the poet (search)
aw Rhymer, some Poet of the People; or at best, in the often degrading position of his favourite Burns himself, whereas in his own country this external difference was practically forgotten. Having s attained. A few of Longfellow's poems have this, but Whittier it pervades; and beginning like Burns, with the very simplest form, the verse of four short lines, he gradually trained himself, like Burns, to more varied or at least to statelier measures. Burns was undoubtedly his literary master in verse and Milton in prose. He said of Burns to Mrs. Fields, He lives, next to Shakespeare, inBurns was undoubtedly his literary master in verse and Milton in prose. He said of Burns to Mrs. Fields, He lives, next to Shakespeare, in the heart of humanity. Fields's Whittier, p. 51. His contentment in simple measures was undoubtedly a bequest from this poet and was carried even farther, while his efforts were more continuous in Burns to Mrs. Fields, He lives, next to Shakespeare, in the heart of humanity. Fields's Whittier, p. 51. His contentment in simple measures was undoubtedly a bequest from this poet and was carried even farther, while his efforts were more continuous in execution and higher in tone. On the other hand, he drew from Milton his long prose sentences and his tendency to the florid rather than the terse. His conversation was terse enough, but not his wr
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
rown, Capt., John, 78, 79. Brown University, 176. Browning, Elizabeth B., 142,165; her Sonnets from the Portuguese, mentioned, 166. Browning, Robert, 153. Bryant, William C., 37, 156. Burleigh, Charles C., 63. Burlington, N. J., 131. Burns, Robert, 19, 88,109; Whittier compared with, 152. Burroughs, George, 18, 103. Burroughs, Rev., George, 180. Butler, Gen. B. F., 110. Byron, Lord, 33. C. Campbell, Mr., 94. Campbell's restaurant, 83. Canada, 10. Carlisle, J. G., 181-139; his love poe-try, 138-149; his My Playmate, 141, 161; sound effect produced in his poetry, 142, 161, 162; his Amy Wentworth, 142; his The Henchman, 143-145; his The sisters, 145-147; his Memories, 147-149; his prose, 150, 151; compared with Burns, 152; D. A. Wasson's opinion of, 153,154; E. C. Stedman's opinion of, 154-157; his Cassandra Southwick, 155, 157-159; little known as to origin of poems, 159; his antislavery poetry, 160; his The New wife and the old, 161; his Songs of labor, 162
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, English men of letters. (search)
English men of letters. Edited by John Morley. Cloth. 12mo. Price, 40 cents, each Addison. By W. J. Courthope. Bacon. By R. W. Church. Bentley. By Prof. Jebb. Bunyan. By J. A. Froude. Burke. By John Morley. Burns. By Principal Shairp. Byron. By Prof. Nichol. Carlyle. By Prof. Nichol. Chaucer. By Prof. A. W. Ward. Coleridge. By H. D. Traill. Cowper. By Goldwin Smith. Defoe. By W. Minto. de Quincey. By Prof. Mason. Dickens. By A. W. Ward. Dryden. By G. Sainksbury. Fielding. By Austin Dobson. Gibbon. By J. Cotter Morison. Goldsmith.. By William Black. gray. By Edmund Gosse. Hume.. By T. H. Huxley. Johnson. By Leslie Stephen. Keats. By Sidney Colvin. Lamb. By Alfred Ainger. Landor. By Sidney Colvin. Locke. By Prof. Fowler. MacAULAYulay. By J. Cotter Morison. Milton. By Mark Pattison. Pope. By Leslie Stephen. SCOlTT. By R. H. Hutton. Skelley. By J. A. Symonds. Sheridan. By Mrs. Oliphant.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, English men of letters. (search)
h Chaucer. By Adolphus William Ward. Spenser. By R. W. Church. Dryden. By George Saintsbury. Milton. By Mark Pattison, B. D. Goldsmith. By William Black. Cowper. By Goldwin Smith. Byron. By John Nichol. Shelley. By John Addington Symonds. Keats. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Wordsworth. By F. W. H. Myers. Southey. By Edward Dowden. Landor. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Lamb. By Alfred Ainger. Addison. By W. J. Courthope. Swift. By Leslie Stephen. Scott. By Richard H. Hutton. Burns. By Principal Shairp. Coleridge. By H. D. Traill. Hume. By T. H. Huxley, F. R.S. Locke. By Thomas Fowler. Burke. By John Morley. Fielding. By Austin Dobson. Thackeray. By Anthony Trollope. Dickens. By Adolphus William Ward. Gibbon. By J. Cotter Morison. Carlylze. By John Nichol. Macaulay. By J. Cotter Morison. Sidney. By J. A. Symonds. De Quincey. By David Masson. Sheridan. By Mrs. Oliphant. Pope. By Leslie Stephen. Johnson. By Leslie Stephen. Gray. By Edmund Gosse