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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 65 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 26 0 Browse Search
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e present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, later, the Lees, the Danas, Allstons, and Wares. It is much to be regretted that so many graves remain unmarked, and equally so that the names of tenants of many costly tombs are unknown by the very imperfect registration, or want of registration, in the town records. Some tombs of once prominent families, who have become extinct, were built on a level with the sod, and as no name or mark whatever is to be seen, are walked over unknown. Several of the substantial above — ground
ge. In that year the curtain suddenly rises on Elijah Corlett's faire Grammar Schoole, by the side of the colmes in with this theory of an earlier school that Mr. Corlett, when we first hear of him in 1643, was already iorder the prudentials of the town should direct. Mr. Corlett had to look to the parents for his pay, but his fplace. The General Court made similar grants for Mr. Corlett's relief, so that his heart was touched, as he hind a college wherein women are trained to do it. Corlett's schoolhouse on Holyoke Street, built by private eay. The school that has come down to us from Elijah Corlett's was undoubtedly a grammar school for a long t came to the Latin Grammar School on Garden Street, Corlett's old school, in 1840, for in that year it was divi at length came to rest the perturbed spirit of Elijah Corlett's transformed, dismembered, and wandering schoohad its home there under the eaves of the college. Corlett's tree was not to be pulled up by the roots and set
212; Berkeley Street School, 212; Browne and Nichols, 212-214; Cambridge School for Girls, 214-217; FittingSchool for Boys and Girls, 217. Schools, public: Elijah Corlett's faire Grammar Schoole, 187; his reputation as a teacher, 188; his first schoolhouse, 188; Indian youths fitting for college, 188; the Court orders towns to appoint teachers, 188; how teachers' salaries were paid, 188; Mr. Corlett's meagre fees, 188; the town comes to the rescue, 188; votes him an annual salary, 188; grants from the General Court, 188; early grammar school a college fitting-school, 188, 189; for boys exclusively, 189; no formal provision for girls, 189; fashionable to ridicule female learning, 190; how girls worked their way into the public schools, 190; successors to Corlett's schoolhouse, 190; transformation of the colonial grammar school, 191; Edward Everett's description of a common town school, 191; a grammar school in a double sense, 191; children comes to includes both sexes, 191; co-educ
rough great hazards, charges, and difficulties; and we humbly desire our honored General Court would addresse themselves by humble petition to his Maiesty for his royall favour in the continuance of the present estableshment and of all the previleges theirof, and that we may not be subjected to the arbitrary power of any who are not chosen by this people according to theire patent, Cambridg the 17th of the 8. 1664. Charles Chauncy. Edward Oakes. Samll. Andrewe. Jonathan Mitchell. Elijah Corlett. Richard Champny. Edmund Frost. Gregory Stone. John Bridge. John Stedman. ffrancis Whitmor. Richard Jackson. Edward Shephard. Gilbert × Cracbon. John Fisenden. John Cooper. Abraham Erringtoon. Humfry Bradsha. John Gibson. Richard Hassell. Danill Kempster. Thomas × Fox. George × Willis. Thomas × Hall. Richard Dana. Nicolas × Wythe. Thomas Chesholm. Samuel Green. Tho. Swetman. Richard Robins. William Diksone. Richard Eccles. Thomas Longhorne. John Watsonn. Roger × B<
ation. Harvard College. Grammar School. Elijah Corlett. Indian students. Corlett's letter of thCorlett's letter of thanks to the County Court. Nicholas Fessenden, Jr. William Fessenden, Jr. Samuel Danforth. veter Cambridge does not appear; but before 1643 Mr. Corlett had taught sufficiently long to have acquird sold of the common, for the gratifying of Mr. Corlett for his pains in keeping a school in the toe levied upon the inhabitants, and given to Mr. Corlett, for his present encouragement to continue ation the equity of allowance to be made to Mr. Corlett, for his maintenance of a grammar school in14, 1684: Voted on the affirmative, that Mr. Elijah Corlett shall be allowed and paid out of the towor Willard, Mr. Russell, and Mr. Danforth: Elijah Corlett, who was latelie your Worps humble petitiooiceth against (exulteth over) judgement. Elijah Corlett humblie blesseth God for you: who cause jex Court Files, 1660. The successors of Mr. Corlett were generally young men fresh from College[2 more...]
83-4, and he m. Hepzibah Minot, wid. of James Minot and dau. of Elijah Corlett, 9 June 1684. His children were Dorcas, b. 22 Aug. 1667, m. Niiel Patten 8 Oct. 1678. Sally, m. Josiah Dickson 10 July 1788. Corlett, Elijah, the famous schoolmaster, educated at Lincoln College, Oxfave resided for about twenty years with her dau. Barbary, w. of Elijah Corlett. She had three children who resided here: William; Richard; and Barbary, m. Elijah Corlett. 2. William, s. of Elizabeth (1), about 1638, owned and occupied the estate at the S. W. corner of Dunster andt Newcastle-upon-Tyne; at which date he empowered Edward Goffe, Elijah Corlett, and Thomas Sweetman, of Camb., and Robert Hale of Chs. to coll Frothingham 4 Dec. 1794. Minott, Hepzibah, granddaughter of Elijah Corlett, m. Daniel Champney 9 June 1684. Mirick, John, m. Elizabeth pzibah, dau. of Daniel and Hepzibah Champney, and granddau. of Elijah Corlett, and had Jonathan, b. 12 Oct. 1714, d. young; Jonathan, b. 27 J
Jan. 1665-6, who d. 7 Feb. 1683-4, and he m. Hepzibah Minot, wid. of James Minot and dau. of Elijah Corlett, 9 June 1684. His children were Dorcas, b. 22 Aug. 1667, m. Nicholas Bowes 6 May 1690; Danipt. 1775. Sarah, m. Nathaniel Patten 8 Oct. 1678. Sally, m. Josiah Dickson 10 July 1788. Corlett, Elijah, the famous schoolmaster, educated at Lincoln College, Oxford, had charge of the Grammaich she declares herself to have resided for about twenty years with her dau. Barbary, w. of Elijah Corlett. She had three children who resided here: William; Richard; and Barbary, m. Elijah Corlett.Elijah Corlett. 2. William, s. of Elizabeth (1), about 1638, owned and occupied the estate at the S. W. corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. He returned to England, and in 1653 resided at Newcastle-upon-Tyne; at which date he empowered Edward Goffe, Elijah Corlett, and Thomas Sweetman, of Camb., and Robert Hale of Chs. to collect debts due to him in New England. He probably d. without children; for Richa
rah, m. Eliazer Ball of Concord 14 June 1688. Miller, Joseph, by w. Mary, had Thomas, b. 9 Ap. 1675; Samuel, b. 24 Sept. 1678. 39 2. Joseph, m. Eunice Coolidge 15 Ap. 1765, and had Joseph, bap. 25 Jan. 1766, prob. m. Mary Tapley of Chs. 3 Dec. 1788; Isaac, bap. 29 Nov. 1767; William, bap. 25 Feb. 1770; James, bap. 16 Feb. 1772; Thomas, bap. 12 Feb. 1774. Humphrey, m. Elizabeth Smith 12 Sept. 1677. Thomas, m. Polly Frothingham 4 Dec. 1794. Minott, Hepzibah, granddaughter of Elijah Corlett, m. Daniel Champney 9 June 1684. Mirick, John, m. Elizabeth Trowbridge 9 Feb. 1681-2. Mitchell, Jonathan (otherwise written Mitchel, Micthel, and Michell), came to New England about 1635 with his father, Jonathan Mitchell, who died at Stamford, Conn., in 1645, a. 54. He grad. H. C. 1647, and commenced preaching at Hartford 24 June 1649, where he was desired to remain. He returned however and preached here, 12 Aug. 1649. On the 25th day of the same month, Rev. Thomas Shepard die
a Gamage 22 June 1710; Martha, bap. 1696-7, m. William Fessenden 12 Oct. 1716. The last two appear to have been the only survivors 19 Aug. 1702, when their father conveyed his estate to trustees for their benefit. William the f. inherited the homestead, and according to a contemporaneous record, was killed by the Indians about 1 Oct. 1703. His w. Ruth had probably deceased before 1702. 5. Jonathan, s. of John (3), m. Hepzibah, dau. of Daniel and Hepzibah Champney, and granddau. of Elijah Corlett, and had Jonathan, b. 12 Oct. 1714, d. young; Jonathan, b. 27 July 1716; Sarah, bap. 17 Aug. 1718, d. unm. 23 Sept. 1743; Deborah, bap. 24 Aug. 1720, m. Daniel Prentice 29 Dec. 1743; Noah, bap. 28 Oct. 1722, prob. d. before 29 Dec. 1743, when the estate was divided between w. Hepzibah, and chil. Jonathan and Deborah. Jonathan the f. was a mason, and d. 24 Sept. 1743. 6. Ebenezer, s. of John (3), m. Susanna Hancock (prob. dau. of Ebenezer), about 1726, and had Ebenezer, b. 8 Ap. 17
435. Cobbett, 35, 69. Coddillgton, 6, 8, 27. Codman, 217. Coffin, 150. Cogswell, 329. Coit, 309. Colby, 20, 32. Collar, 76. Collecott, 385. Collins, 35, 56, 117, 250, 305. Collyer, 321, 30. Colman, 135, 369. Conant, 419. Cooke, 34-40, 2, 3, 56, 9, 75-8, 81, 110, 11, 18, 76, 82, 222, 39, 50, 90, 4, 314, 31, 84, 97, 8, 418. Coolidge, 133, 85, 305, 14, 17, 32, 69. Cooper, 35, 59, 75, 92,4, 105, 43, 63, 98, 269, 78, 9, 305, 412. Corbett, 53. Corlett, 58, 75, 366-8, 73. Corwin, 115. Cotton, 29-31, 7, 43, 135, 249, 51, 83, 94, 368, 406. Cowden, 416. Cowls, 411. Cox, 219. Crackbone, 35, 59, 75, 255, 63, 80, 401. Cradock, 197. Crafford, 110. Craigie, 18:3-6,203-8,14, 310. Crane, 309, 29. Cromwell, 63, 7, 399. Crosby, 35. Croswell, 338, 9. Crow, 62. Crown, 67. Cudworth, 153, 4. Cullock, 254. Cummings, 314. Cushing, 239, 321. Cushman, 319. Cutshakin, 384. Cutler, 76, 97, 120,
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