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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 81 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 49 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. G. Foster or search for J. G. Foster in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 12 document sections:

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
anding Stevens, Pembina, Lieut.-Commanding Bankhead, and four armed boats from the Wabash, carrying howitzers, under charge of Lieutenants Upshur, Luce and Irwin, and Acting Master Kempff, all of which were to enter the Coosaw by Beaufort river; the gun-boat Seneca, Lieut.-Com. Ammen, and the tug-boat Ellen, Acting-Master Budd, to participate, both of which were to move up Beaufort River and approach the batteries at Seabrook and Port Royal Ferry, by Whale Branch. The armed Tug Hale, Acting-Master Foster, was also ordered to report to the commander of the expedition. The gun-boats reached Beaufort on the 31st December, 1862, and in order not to give the enemy notice of their approach, they remained there until after dark, when they ascended the river to within two miles of the Coosaw. At 4 o'clock the next morning the gun-boats moved up and joined General Stevens at the appointed rendezvous. Here the troops embarked, crossed the Coosaw, and landed at Haywood's plantation, and wit
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
was soon in advance of the troops, but he paid with his life the penalty of his gallantry and was shot through the head by a concealed rifleman while standing on deck directing affairs. A number of his men fell, killed or wounded at the same time. Had Buchanan lived five minutes longer he would have had the satisfaction of seeing the enemy fleeing in every direction. At the same time the gallant Acting-Master Wiggins was severely wounded by a Minie-ball through the shoulder, and Acting-Ensign Foster through the cheek. On board the Calhoun on this occasion three were killed and six wounded, and on board the Kinsman one was wounded. Lieutenant-Commander Buchanan was a great loss to the Union cause, but the object for which he had labored many months,--the opening of the Teche — had been accomplished. This would have happened earlier if a sufficient number of troops had been sent to accompany the gun-boats in the first instance, but it seems seldom to have been realized that th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
In the mean time gun-boats were detailed and prepared for the expedition. These vessels were the Chillicothe, Lieutenant-Commander Foster, the Baron DeKalb, Lieutenant-Commander Walker, the tinclad Rattler, Lioness (ram) and two other light draft v and take position behind the woods in a bend, and there make their preparations for attack. The Chillicothe, Lieutenant-Commander Foster, and the DeKalb. Lieutenant-Commander Walker, took position. side by side, tied up to the bank with bows down At this time, unfortunately, Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith gave evidence of aberration of mind, and much hampered Foster and Walker by contradictory orders which they felt bound to obey. The Chillicothe was temporarily disabled by having hrch, Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, owing to aberration of mind, gave up the command of the Naval force to Lieutenant-Commander Foster, who after trying all that could be thought of, followed the Army which had been ordered to retire from before
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
Lieutenant-Commanders Phelps and Fitch have each had command of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, and have shown themselves to be most able officers. I feel no apprehension at any time with regard to movements in that quarter. Had it not been for the activity and energy displayed by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, Captain Pennock and Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, General Rosecrans would have been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operation with the Army corps commanders, at all times, which enabled them to carry out their plans successfully. The Benton, Lieutenant-Commander Greer, Mound City, Lieutenant Byron Wilson, Tuscumbia, Lieutenant-Commander Shirk. Carondelet, Acting Lieutenant Murphy, and the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
s of Lieutenant Flusser on the Chowan River. attack on Plymouth, N. C. the Southfield disabled. achievements of General J. G. Foster. Army and Navy co-operate in expedition against Goldsborough, N. C. Lieutenant Cushing's expedition against Wilmh service to the Army contingent under General Negley; also a successful military expedition up the Neuse River under General Foster, in which the Navy participated, with much credit to its commander, Commander Alexander Murray. On December 31st, erwards Captain) J. P. Bankhead. One of the most energetic of the military commanders in this neighborhood was General J. G. Foster, who was always on the alert to circumvent the enemy in his movements. The war in North Carolina was not prosecectiveness of their batteries that they seldom attacked the military posts except in the absence of the gun-boats. General Foster was fully alive to the value of the naval branch of the forces, and availed himself on all occasions of its services.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
boats uncomfortable. On the 28th of July the enemy commenced the erection of batteries at Four Mile Creek, where they had assembled a large force for the purpose of covering the men at work in the trenches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's front. The gun-boats were brought into requisition. and the Agawam, Commander A. C. Rhind, and the Mendota, Commander E. T. Nichols, shelled the enemy's works for some time, rendering very effective service in connection with General Hancock's military operations. The following night, in view of the military movements ordered by General Grant, all the troops, except General Foster's original command, were ordered to move from Deep Bottom, under cover of the gun-boats. Here, again, General Grant had an opportunity of utilizing the Navy. As an instance of the activity of the Confederates in presence of the strong forces of the Federals, which almost enveloped them, on August 3d they established a 6-gun rifled 12-pounder bat
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
kawanna. Captain, John B. Marchand; Lieutenants, T. C. Bowen and S. A. McCarty; Surgeon, Thomas W. Leach; Paymaster, James Fulton; Acting-Master, Felix McCurley; Ensigns, G. H. Wadleigh and Frank Wildes; Acting-Ensign, Geo. T. Chapman; Acting-Master's Mates, Charles Welles and John Cannon; Engineers: Acting-Chief, W. A. R. Latimer; Second-Assistants, R. H. Gunnell and E. J. Whittaker; Third-Assistants, G. W. Roche, C. F. Marsland, B. E. Pike and I. B. Fort; Boatswain, W. E. Leeds; Gunner, J. G. Foster. *steamer Itasca. Lieutenant-Commander, George Brown, at Mobile; Acting-Master, Richard Hustace; Acting-Ensigns, C. H. Hurd and James Igo; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Henry Rockwood; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, George L. Mead; Acting-Master's Mate, Henry Myron; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, M. H. Gerry; Acting-Third-Assistants, Owen Raney and George C. Irelan. Note.--List not given in Navy Register for January, and is, therefore, incomplete. Store ship Potomac. Comm
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
Commander George H. Cooper, and Nipsic, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson, were sent as outside cruisers to cover the blockade south of Port Royal, where it was weakest, and where the chief effort was to be made. A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by cutting the railroad between Charleston and Savannah. Generals Foster, Schimmelfennig and Hatch were to land, each with a force considered adequate for the occasion, while General Birney was to go Generals Foster, Schimmelfennig and Hatch were to land, each with a force considered adequate for the occasion, while General Birney was to go into the North Edisto, and as high as possible, to destroy the railroad. The Navy was to enter the Stono to co-operate with General Schimmelfennig. One or two gun-boats were to ascend the North Edisto, and co-operate with General Birney to secure his landing. On the 2d day of July the Monitors Lehigh and Montauk crossed the Stono bar, while the remaining naval force consisted of the Pawnee, McDonough and Racer. Though the plans were well made, nothing resulted from this expedition. The
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
n of a magazine on shore. This vessel was one of those frail craft of which we have so often spoken, in which so much was dared and done. Lieutenant-Commander English, in the Wyalusing, had the forethought, when the enemy began to retreat, to cover the road by which they were moving off with his guns and kept up a rapid fire with bursting shell, which caused the Confederates to throw away their arms and accoutrements, many of which were picked up. Acting-Master Mr. R. Hathaway and Acting-Ensign Foster, of the Wyalusing, were the first to enter Fort Williams, one of the strongest works, where they planted the Union colors and captured three prisoners. The Shamrock, Commander Macomb's vessel, was struck six times by shot and shell, most of the enemy's projectiles passing over her. Two of her men were killed and seven wounded. These, with the killed and wounded on board the Commodore Hull, were the only casualties on the flotilla, which was remarkable, considering the number of hea
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
Formation of the naval brigade. operations of Generals Sherman and Foster in the vicinity of Savannah. expedition up Broad River and Boyd's upon Savannah. He accordingly entered into an arrangement with General Foster to co-operate with Sherman in case the latter might require asstroops, Admiral Dahlgren returning to his duty afloat. After General Foster had landed all his soldiers, an advance was made towards the rahe Confederates, it was concluded to reinforce the troops under General Foster on Broad River, and make a demonstration in the direction of thHead in company with Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, to communicate with General Foster, and make the latter acquainted with his plans; but on his retue from the fleet, composed of seamen and marines, remained with General Foster's command, and the officers and men were transferred to their ry the movements of the Navy in co-operation with the Army under General Foster, we can only say that the attempt to invest Charleston by Bull'
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