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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hepburn or search for Hepburn in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
d, in his answer, he had no authority to exchange prisoners, but would gladly accept the proffered privilege of sending a supply of clothing. In a short time Colonel Hepburn and Captain H. S. Lee arrived with a wagon load of clothing (Colonel Hepburn is now a member of Congress from Iowa), which was distributed under the directionColonel Hepburn is now a member of Congress from Iowa), which was distributed under the direction of the federal officers. General Forrest then directed his surgeons to examine the prisoners, and such as were unfit to undergo hardship were sent back with Colonel Hepburn and the wagon, with the promise they would not bear arms against the Confederate cause until exchanged. The remainder, about four hundred, were mounted on Colonel Hepburn and the wagon, with the promise they would not bear arms against the Confederate cause until exchanged. The remainder, about four hundred, were mounted on the extra horses and the march taken up to Hernando. Including the prisoners, Forrest had about two thousand men without rations. He knew he could not obtain any before reaching Panola. With characteristic promptness, and with the matchless resource, which always met every emergency, he decided to draw on General Washburne.