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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 185 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 179 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 120 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 94 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 80 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 75 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 62 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Edward Johnson or search for Edward Johnson in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
army crossed the Rapidan at Germanna and Camp of the Military telegraph Corps, Brandy Station, Va. other fords and moved in the direction of Mine Run. The season was not favorable. The weather was bitterly cold and the roads were difficult. General French with the Third Corps, crossing the Rapidan at Germanna Ford, became engaged with the enemy on the 27th at Payne's Farm. He advanced through heavy undergrowth and an almost impassable tangle and was sharply resisted by the enemy — Edward Johnson's division and Gordon's brigade. French's advance was checked. Part of the Sixth Corps was hurried forward to French's support but took no part in the action. Night coming on, a further attempt to advance was deemed unadvisable. Meanwhile, and several miles to the left, on broader and better roads, the other corps of the army had passed the Rapidan and had moved out to the position of Mine Run. This little stream runs northward into the Rapidan through a valley bordered on both side
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
urning to the right made a vigorous attack upon Edward Johnson's division, posted across the turnpike. J. M. take its place. Rodes's division was thrown in on Johnson's right, south of the road, and the line, thus reeses as prisoners. Ewell's entire corps was now up-Johnson's division holding the turnpike, Rodes's division ogle, Spotsylvania. From a War-time photograph. Johnson's division, for the reason given, that they were difficult of access. Johnson's division held an elevated point somewhat advanced from the general line, and knowry had been withdrawn on the night of the 11th, General Johnson discovered that the enemy was concentrating in and rushed to the attack. They came on, to use General Johnson's words, in great disorder, with a narrow frontlumn, which soon overran the salient, capturing General Johnson himself, 20 pieces of artillery, and 2800 men-a salient, where Rodes's division had connected with Johnson's, the attack was still pressed with great determin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
nication with Richmond. The 9th, 10th, and 11th were spent in manoeuvring and fighting, without decisive results. Among the killed on the 9th was that able and distinguished soldier Major-General John Sedgwick, commanding the Sixth Army Corps. Major-General H. G. Wright succeeded him in command. Early on the morning of the 12th a general attack was made on the enemy in position. The Second Corps, Major-General Hancock commanding, carried a salient of his line, capturing most of [Edward] Johnson's division of Ewell's corps and twenty pieces of artillery. But the resistance was so obstinate that the advantage gained did not prove decisive. The 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th were consumed in manoeuvring and awaiting the arrival of reenforcements from Washington. Deeming it impracticable to make any further attack upon the enemy at Spotsylvania Court House, orders were issued on the 18th with a view to a movement to the North Anna, to commence at 12 o'clock on the night of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
e Orange Plank road, Getty was directed to move out toward him, by way of the Brock road, and drive Hill back, if possible, behind Parker's store. On our right Johnson's division of Ewell was driven back along the Orange turnpike in confusion by General Griffin of Warren's corps. Ricketts and Wright of Sedgwick were delayed in ike; then came the brigades of Penrose and Russell, then Neill's brigade of Getty's division. Soon after getting into position Neill and Russell were attacked by Johnson, who was repulsed. Still farther to the right, toward the Germanna Plank road, Seymour, of Ricketts's division, came up and took position. The entire Union fronult at 4 A. M. on the 12th. Warren and Wright were to hold their corps in readiness to take part. We moved to the attack at 4:35 A. M. on the 12th, and captured Johnson and four thousand men from Ewell; also twenty pieces of artillery. At this time I was shot in the head and went to the rear. Another will tell of the incidents
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. (search)
Hand-to-hand fighting at Spotsylvania. by G. Norton Galloway. General Hancock's surprise and capture of the larger portion of Edward Johnson's division, and the capture of the salient at Spotsylvania Court House on the 12th of May, 1864, accomplished with the Second Corps, have been regarded as one of the most brilliant featsEarly) on the right. The point to be assaulted was a salient of field-works on the Confederate center, afterward called the Bloody angle. It was held by General Edward Johnson's division. Here the Confederate line broke off at an angle of ninety degrees, the right parallel, about the length of a small brigade, being occupied byt with the bewildered enemy, in which guns were used as clubs, possessed themselves of the intrenchments. Over three thousand prisoners were taken, including General Johnson and General Steuart. Twenty Confederate cannon became the permanent trophies of the day, twelve of them belonging to Page and eight to Cutshaw. Upon reachi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
Col. E. N. Atkinson; 31st Ga., Col. C. A. Evans; 38th Ga.,----; 60th Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas J. Berry; 61st Ga.,----. Johnson's division, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Stonewall Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James A. Walker: 2d Va., Capt. C. H. Stewart; 4thMaj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Stonewall Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James A. Walker: 2d Va., Capt. C. H. Stewart; 4th Va., Col. William Terry; 5th Va.,----; 27th Va., Lieut.-Col. Charles L. Haynes; 33d Va.,----. Steuart's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George H. Steuart: 1st N. C., Col. H. A. Brown; 3d N. C., Col. S. D. Thruston; 10th Va.,----; 23d Va.,----; 37th Va.,----. Jon. Clingman's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas L. Clingman: 8th N. C.,----; 31st N. C.,----; 51st N. C.,----; 61st N. C.,----. Johnson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson, Col. John S. Fulton: 17th and 23d Tenn., Col. R. H. Keeble; 25th and 44th Tennssing. The reported casualties at Spotsylvania are as follows: Ewell's corps (May 10th), 650, and (May 19th), 900; Edward Johnson's division (May 12th), over 2000; and McGowan's brigade (May 12th), 86 killed, 248 wounded, and 117 missing. The f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
cond Army Corps494 24425743,510 Fifth Army Corps149749 4421,340 Sixth Army Corps483 20641682,715 Ninth Army Corps219 11263561,701 Eighteenth Army Corps448 23652063,019 Cavalry Corps51328 70449 Aggregate18449077 181612,737 The Confederate Army, General Robert E. Lee. The organization of the Army of Northern Virginia at Cold Harbor was substantially the same as at the Wilderness (see p. 183), with the exception of some transfers and consolidations of brigades (notably those of Ed. Johnson's division, which had been badly shattered at Spotsylvania) and the accession of Hoke's old brigade and the divisions of Pickett, Breckinridge, and Hoke. Insufficient data, however, prevent the preparation of a full list of the troops and commanders. For the same reason the editors have also found it impossible to give the strength of the army. It is nowhere authoritatively stated. Upon this subject Colonel Walter H. Taylor ( Four years with General Lee, p. 136) remarks: The only reen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
General Lee. The announcement of the disaster was the first news which came to him of this movement of the enemy. He galloped forward in the darkness of the morning and learned the extent of it from those engaged in rallying the remnants of Edward Johnson's division and in making arrangements to check Hancock. The occasion aroused all the combative energies of his soldier nature, and he rode forward with his columns toward the captured angle. His generals expostulated with him, and his men cartillery proved of great assistance in his withdrawal from his hazardous position. The battles of Spotsylvania Court House closed with the 19th of May. It gives a clearer idea of the nature of this tremendous contest to group by Major-General Edward Johnson, C. S. A. From a photograph. days and count its various combats from the beginning of the campaign: On May 5th, three; on May 6th, four; on May 8th, two; on May 10th, five; on May 12th, repeated assaults during twenty hours in salient
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Battery, Capt. J. W. Mebane, Lieut. J. W. Phillips; La. Battery, Lieut. W. C. D. Vaught, Capt. C. I. Slocomb, Lieut. J. A. Chalaron. Palmer's Battalion: Ala. Battery, Capt. C. L. Lurmsden; Ga. Battery, Capt. R. W. Anderson; Ga. Battery, Capt. M. W. Havis. Hood's (or Lee's) Corps, Lieut.-Gen. John B. Hood, Maj.-Gen. C. L. Stevenson, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Hindman's division, Maj.-Gen. T. C. Hindman, Brig.-Gen. John C. Brown, Maj.-Gen. Patton Anderson, Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson. Escort: B, 3d Ala. Cav., Capt. F. J. Billingslea. Deas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas, Col. J. G. Coltart, Brig.-Gen. G. D. Johnston, Col. J. G. Coltart, Lieut.-Col. H. T. Toulmin, Brig.-Gen. Z. C. Deas: 19th Ala., Col. S. K. McSpadden, Lieut.-Col. G. R. Kimbrough; 22d Ala., Col. B. R. Hart, Capt. Isaac M. Whitney, Col. H. T. Toulmin; 25th Ala., Col. G. D. Johnston, Capt. N. B. Rouse; 39th Ala., Lieut.-Col. W. C. Clifton, Capt. T. J. Brannon, Capt. A. J. Miller, Capt. A. A.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
eached the Tennessee, near Florence, on the 30th; [Edward] Johnson's division crossed the river and took possession of that tscumbia, at which place I arrived on the 31st of October. Johnson's division, which held possession of Florence, was reenformy. I sent several of my staff with orders to Stewart and Johnson to make all possible haste. Meantime I rode to one side aer the pike, and again sent a staff-officer to Stewart and Johnson to push forward. At the same time I dispatched a Map osent staff-officers to the rear with orders to Stewart and Johnson to make all possible haste, Stewart was forming line of bathus could have made it an easy matter to Stewart's corps, Johnson's division, and Lee's two divisions, from Columbia, to havleft, was received and was immediately communicated to General Johnson, whose division was on my left and nearest the pike. r enemy by the hair or the collar. Just before dark Edward Johnson's division of Lee's corps moved gallantly to the suppo
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