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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 160 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 73 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 57 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 33 9 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 15 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
T. Dana, Wounded September 17. (2) Col. Norman J. Hall; 19th Mass., Col. Edward W. Hinks, Lieut.-Col. Arthur F. Devereux; 20th Mass., Col. William R. Lee; 7th Mich., Col. Norman J. Hall, Capt. Charles J. Hunt; 42d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. George N. Bomford, Maj. James E. Mallon; 59th N. Y., Col. William L. Tidball. Artillery, 1st R. I. Light, Batt. A, Capt. John A. Tompkins; 1st U. S., Batt. I, Lieut. George A. Woodruff. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. William H. French:--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Nathan Kimball; 14th Ind., Col. William Harrow; 8th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Franklin Sawyer; 132d Pa., Col. Richard A. Oakford, Lieut.-Col. Vincent M. Wilcox; 7th W. Va., Col. Joseph Snider. Second Brigade, Col. Dwight Morris; 14th Conn., Lieut.-Col. Sanford H. Perkins; 108th N. Y., Col. Oliver H. Palmer; 130th Pa., Col. Henry I. Zinn. Third Brigade, (1) Brig.-Gen. Max Weber, Wounded September 17. (2) Col. John W. Andrews; 1st Del., Col. John W. Andrews, Lieut.-Col. Oliver H. Hopkinson; 5th Md., Maj.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. No. 13Surg. J. Theodore Heard, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No. 14Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. No. 15Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 4-September 8. No. 16Col. Isaac M. Kirby, One hundred and first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 17Capt. William H. Jamison, Twenty-first Illinois Infantry, of o0Capt. John C. Taylor, Eighty-fourth Indiana Infantry, of operations August 16-September 8. No. 31Col. Thomas E. Rose, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry. No. 32Brig. Gen. John Newton, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division. No. 33Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, of operations May 22-August 4. No. 34Col. Emerson Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations August 6-September 8. No. 35Lieut. Col. Porter C. Ol
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
nk and driving him into his rifle-pits, with considerable loss, however, to our troops. Our men had to contend with an almost hidden foe, the ground being cut up into ravines and covered by a dense forest filled with undergrowth; but notwithstanding all the difficulties of the country both officers and men did their work nobly, and having assumed a position were not to be moved from it. The enemy came out of his works in front of Newton's division, of Howard's corps, attacking Wagner's and Kimball's brigades, but was driven back after a short and warm contest. General Davis occupied Dallas with his division on the afternoon of the 27th, skirmishing with the enemy and driving him as far as he could without losing his connection with General McPherson. Davis reported that after skirmishing all the afternoon he developed the enemy in force and strongly posted in front of his (Davis') left, with a battery in position on a hill commanding the road between him and General Hooker. Davis
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
reful examination of the ground, I found only two points where the troops could have a reasonable cover in Stanley's front, and decided to make two columns of attack. Brigadier-General Harker led one column and General Wagner another, while General Kimball moved in support in echelon with Wagner's brigade. These columns had each a regimental division front, and were separated by about 100 yards interval. The whole front was covered by a strong line of skirmishers. Such troops of Stanley's a belonging to Newton, opened fire upon the enemy's columns. He was then! easily repulsed, after the first attack. Several subsequent assaults were made upon Newton's lines, the action lasting till after dark. The brigade commanders, Brigadier-General Kimball, Colonels Bradley and Blake, are highly complimented for gallantry; also other officers, in General Newton's report. The position held was vital, securing, as it did, the Buck Head and Atlanta road, and constituting the left of our rig
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
ine occupied by them. The First Division and Kimball's brigade, of Newton's division, were accordiupon our pickets became more serious, and General Kimball had to send two regiments, which had justades of his division and Taylor's brigade, of Kimball's division, co-operated with the Fourteenth Cn position to guard this road, and Wood's and Kimball's divisions were encamped in line upon the Atting the artillery and trains, and Wood's and Kimball's divisions were pushed forward to the railrons. At daylight the corps was put in motion, Kimball's and Newton's divisions down the railroad, Wbout 4 p. m. Kirby's and Grose's brigades, of Kimball's division, were deployed and instructed to pn's division was also deployed on the left of Kimball's and urged to push forward as rapidly as posupon my left flank. The loss, principally in Kimball's division, was about 100 men killed and wounach the rebel right flank. Generals Wood and Kimball met very bad ground in their advance. The co[8 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
No. 15. report of Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 4-September 8. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourth Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 1864. Sir: In obedience to Special Field Orders, No, 212, extract VII, dated headquarters Department of the Cumberland, August 3, 1864, I assumed command of this division on the day following that on which the order was issued, the division being then in position near the Howard house, about two miles northeasterly from Atlanta, on the left of the corps. Not having yet received the reports of the brigade commanders, I have not sufficient data from which to compile a history of the division during this campaign previous to that date, and shall, therefore, in this report speak only of its actions since I became its commander. On the 5th I was ordered by you to make a reconnaissance, which I did, demonstrating mean time with my whole picket-line, but did not succeed in developing any
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
on us, and at times during the day opened a very heavy artillery fire. June 23, at 3 a. m. was relieved by Colonel Scribner's brigade, Fourteenth Army Corps, and moved to the right about one mile, and relieved portions of Generals Harker's and Kimball's brigades. June 24, advanced skirmish line (Eightyfirst Indiana) and seized a ridge occupied by the enemy's skirmishers. One hundred and first Ohio and Twenty-first Illinois moved closely in support of skirmish line, and with assistance of pt. My regiments engaged performed their work in an admirable manner. June 25 and 26, occupied the same position, subjected to an annoying fire from the enemy. June 27, at 8 a. m. formed in column, regimental front, supporting in echelon. General Kimball's brigade formed for assault. The assault proving unsuccessful, was withdrawn and placed in same position occupied before. June 28, 29, and 30, occupied same position. July 1, in same position, with heavy skirmish and artillery firing. J
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
ich had been rendered almost impregnable against assault. The reserve regiments of the brigade were moved, in accordance with orders from Major-General Stanley, on the night of the 2d instant about one-half a mile to the left, and relieved General Kimball's brigade, of Newton's division. At early dawn on the 3d instant, the enemy being gone, the brigade was assembled and massed in an open field and awaited orders for pursuit. At 7 a. m., pursuant to orders, the brigade took up the line of mbut were kept off by the flankers. On the 31st we again struck out for the Macon railroad, this brigade in advance. We had not proceeded far when brisk skirmishing ensued, and we discovered a strong line of works in our front. By order of General Kimball I formed my brigade in line and commenced the construction of works. Believing the enemy to be in weak force the skirmishers were ordered forward and soon drove the rebels from their works, which were found to be quite formidable. I brough
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
during the night. September 1, our division marched at 6 a. m., First Brigade in advance, moving on the railroad toward Jonesborough; and under orders spent most of the day in the destruction of the railroad as we advanced. At about 4 p. m. the advanced brigade of our division made a junction with the left of the Fourteenth Corps on the railroad at a point about two miles north of Jonesborough. The First Brigade formed in line, its right near or upon the railroad. I was ordered by General Kimball to prolong the. left of the First Brigade, which I did without halting, until my advance was checked by getting into a thick bramble or underbrush and a swamp in a dense woodland, through which it was impossible to ride; and the enemy with a heavy skirmish line in our front and his artillery in reach, playing upon us, contributed to impede our progress. The course or direction when I entered the woods seemed to be about south, and upon emerging from it, at a distance of a half to three
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 29 (search)
gade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, in the recent campaign, since September 4, when I assumed command of the brigade, in accordance with orders from Brigadier-General Kimball, commanding First Division, Fourth Army Corps. September 4, on assuming command of the brigade I found it in position in front of the enemy, the righ readiness, moving with the column. I arrived at Jonesborough September 6 at 3 a. m. Owing to the darkness and great fatigue of my men, I asked permission of General Kimball to camp my command in front of the works built and occupied by my brigade on entering the town on September 1. It was granted, with instructions to occupy thl Kirby. Arriving on the ground in rear of Atlanta, formerly occupied by a portion of the Army of the Tennessee, at 1 o'clock, I took position as directed by General Kimball, which ground is at present occupied by my command. In the absence of General Grose I am unable to give a report prior to the date herein given. No co
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