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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 215 31 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 193 35 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 176 18 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 146 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 139 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 126 20 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 86 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Edward Lee or search for Robert Edward Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 76 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks of Captain John Lamb on March 24, 1899, at Richmond, Virginia, in the Hall of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. In accepting, on behalf of the Camp, the portrait of General Thomas T. Munford, C. S. Cavalry. (search)
Remarks of Captain John Lamb on March 24, 1899, at Richmond, Virginia, in the Hall of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. In accepting, on behalf of the Camp, the portrait of General Thomas T. Munford, C. S. Cavalry. [The portrait, in oil, of General Thomas T. Munford, Confederate States Cavalry, a striking life-likeness, executed by Bernard Gutman, of Lynchburg, Virginia, was presented on Friday evening, March 24, 1899, to Robert E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, in a chaste address by MRobert E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, in a chaste address by Major Samuel Griffin of Bedford City, Virginia, who served as Adjutant-General on the staff of General Munford. It was evidently, as stated by the speaker, a labor of love, and was in glowing eulogy of the personal virtues and valor of the distinguished cavalry leader. The description of the disbanding of General Munford's famous command after the memorable surrender of April 9, 1865, was highly pathetic. The speaker said, in conclusion, that he could not refrain from a passing tribute to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
h about a quarter of a mile from the field, I saw General Lee riding unattended, and after a few minutes of obso the crowd, and the latter came to a halt. Then General Lee was seen to ride up, and we, as was usual, wantedm. General Pickett broke out into tears, while General Lee rode up to him, and they shook hands. General LeGeneral Lee spoke to General Pickett in a slow and distinct manner. Anyone could see that he, too, felt the repulse and laughter of the division, whose remains he viewed. Lee's words. Of the remarks made to General Pickett by General Lee, we distinctly heard him say: General Pickett, your men have done all that men could do; the faultg for you? General Kemper looked up and replied: General Lee, you can do nothing for me; I am mortally woundedull justice is done my men who made this charge. General Lee said: I will, and rode off. General Pickett tuwas returned to the wagon. Then the order from General Lee, constituting Picketts division the provost guard
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Parole list of Engineer troops, Army of Northern Virginia, surrendered at Appomattox C. H., April 9th, 1865. (search)
Parole list of Engineer troops, Army of Northern Virginia, surrendered at Appomattox C. H., April 9th, 1865. Contributed by Colonel T. M. R. Talcott. The Engineer Troops attached to the Army of Northern Virginia, under the Command of General Robert E. Lee, comprised the 1st Regiment of 10 companies, and two companies, G and H, of the 2nd Regiment. Company K, of the 1st Regiment, was on detached service with pontoon trains at Staunton river, and was therefore not surrendered at Appomattox. The officers and men who were surrendered at Appomattox were as follows: Field and staff. T. M. R. Talcott, Colonel Commanding; Wm. W. Blackford, Lieutenant-Colonel; Peyton Randolph, Major; Russell Murdoch, Surgeon, P. A. C. S.; Jno. S. Conrad, Assistant Surgeon; C. W. Trueheart, Assistant Surgeon; Lewis E. Harvie, Captain and A. C. S.; George N. Eakin, Captain and A. Q. M.; Chapman Maupin, Second Lieutenant, Company F, and Acting Adjutant; J. D. Harris, Second Lieutenant, P. A. C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Stonewall Jackson's death. [from the times-dispatch May 29, 1934.j Wounded by his own Men—Last order on the battlefield. The writer of the following article served under Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson in the war between the States. He says: General Lee's army was located on the south side of the Rappahannock river, near Fredericksburg, Va., in the winter of 1863. General Hooker's army was on the opposite side, 2nd in the early spring crossed the Rappahannock. On the morning of May 2, 1863, General Stonewall Jackson received orders from General Lee to attack Hooker's rear, and forthwith Jackson put his corps in rapid marching order. About 5 P. M. Jackson had reached the desired location in the rear of Hooker's army and at once gave orders to attack the enemy. The movement of the Confederates was so sudden and terrific that the Federal troops were routed in the utmost confusion. The Confederates continued to advance until about 9 P. M. Jackson had paralyz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Presentation of the portrait of Lieut.-General Wade Hampton, C. S. Cavalry, [from the times-dispatch, September 16, 1904.] (search)
. Cavalry, [from the times-dispatch, September 16, 1904.] To R. E. Lee Camp, C. V., at Richmond, Va., September 15, 1904. Addresses ong or dead. That duty demands that I present, at this time, to R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, in the name and on behalf of the Washington Light Insequent career, I nevertheless take for granted that no member of R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, which tonight accepts any more than any member of thrly and lovingly commit this portrait to the trustworthy hands of R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, in full assurance of its welcome to this, the camp's the old time mark of respect and affection. Were it for us of R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, to choose an epitaph for the monument yonder at Colupton's virtues and abilities by his great commander, peerless Robert Edward Lee, in a letter from the latter to him in the summer of 1865. and every way great man from another. What a world of meaning General Lee's words convey! What a world of meaning! They are these: Liste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern women in the Civil war. [from the New Orleans, la., Picayune, June 12, 1904.] (search)
family sat under the then famous Dr. Hoge, literally overflowing to the streets. [Mr. De Leon trips in this statement in his entertaining communication. Mr. Davis was then at Montgomery, Ala., the first capital of the Confederacy, and was besides, an Episcopalian, and attended, while in Richmond, St. Paul's Church, under the ministration of the late Rev. Charles Minnigerode, D. D., of beloved memory. He was seated in St. Paul's on the Sunday of April 2, 1865, when he received from General Lee intelligence of the intention to evacuate Richmond, and this incident of the Dies Irae of April 3, 1865, was doubtless the occasion of the lapsus memoriae of Mr. De Leon. The ludicrous Pawnee scare of Sunday, April 21, 1861, was only three days after the passing of the Ordinance of Secesson by the Virginia convention. The description of the consternation prevailing is not overdrawn; it pervaded all classes of citizens. A well-known merchant, of diminutive stature, armed with a gun on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
rced to retreat. His opponents were numerically too strong. The campaign had proved disastrous, partly through the non-arrival of expected re-enforcements from the Transmississppi Department, and on January 13, 1865, General Hood requested to be relieved of his command. This request was finally granted, and on the 23d he bade farewell to the Army of Tennessee. After a sojourn in Richmond for several weeks, General Hood then was ordered to Texas to form a new army, when the report of General Lee's surrender reached him. It was not until in receipt of positive information of the surrender of General E. Kirby Smith that he rode into Hatche on the 31st of May, 1865, and there proffered his sword to Major-General Davidson, U. S. A., who bade him retain it and paroled the officers and men in General Hood's company to proceed to New Orleans. A battle is not comparable to a game of chess, in which two keen, agile and alert minds, the leaders of opposing armies, are pitted against eac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Gettysburg, [from the times-dispatch, April 10, 1904.] (search)
I was picked up by the Union forces after their lines were reformed, and I take this occasion to express my grateful recollection of the attention I received on the field, particularly from Colonel Hess, of the 72d Pennsylvania (I think). If he still lives, I hope yet to have the pleasure of grasping his hand and expressing to him my gratitude for his kindness to me. Only the brave know how to treat a fallen foe. I cannot close this letter without reference to the Confederate chief, General R. E. Lee. Somebody blundered at Gettysburg but not Lee. He was too great a master of the art of war to have hurled a handful of men against an army. It has been abundantly shown that the fault lay not with him, but with others, who failed to execute his orders. This has been written amid interruptions, and is an imperfect attempt to describe the great charge, but I have made the effort to comply with your request because of your very kind and friendly letter, and because there is no reason
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
ressed in nice, clean uniforms, that contrasted very strongly with the clothing of those of my brigade. General Lee in front of Pegram's Brigade. In the rear of these well-dressed troops I saw four mounted men among them; recognized General Robert E. Lee and Major-General John B. Gordon. General Lee rode towards my brigade, and as soon as I had fronted the men I turned towards him, saluting for my orders. He paid no attention to me, but wheeled his horse to the right, passed through therenches only some two hundred yards away; obscured they were, it is true, by the underbrush and in some cases by the contour of the land, but ready to push forward to the capture of the parked reserve artillery ammunition just behind us. General R. E. Lee appears. General Lee's headquarters were but a short distance away, and a few minutes would decide whether the grand Army of Northern Virginia, which had sent so many Federal generals to defeat, would fall before this first strong attack
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.41 (search)
Northern Virginia. But it did not infect Kershaw's division. General Lee's high estimate of General Early. That General Early's unpopulacement from command of the Valley forces. This was urged upon General Lee through Governor Smith, who had commanded a brigade in Early's dnfidence in him, and Fisher's Hill was the terrible sequence. General Lee replied, asking the name of the officer quoted-that justice to Gd the charges on which the request was based at much length. In General Lee's response he defended General Early with vigor. Of his conductd the correspondence. And there is every reason to believe that General Lee went to his grave with his estimate of General Early unchanged. s's endorsement on the correspondence between Governor Smith and General Lee: With less opportunity to learn all the facts than General General Lee possessed, I had reached the conclusion which he expresses. With the knowledge acquired after events, it is usually easy to point out mo
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