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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
n, some description is necessary of Major General William Mahone, the leader and moving spirit of the occasion. Mahone was a singular illustration of the fact that the Confederate service, while welldened as the turning movement progressed. General Mahone promptly noticed the bad formation of thisn thrown well forward in the air. The march of Mahone's Division to the front was concealed from the General Wilcox was dispatched to the right of Mahone, and was expected to render him support by moving to the front and connecting with his (Mahone's) right, and by afterward conforming with the lattd its results might have been very momentous. Mahone, moving cautiously to the front, holding his tmarred in execution by the manner in which General Mahone was supported. If the division of Wilcox gard to the various movements conducted by General Mahone, which reflected such lustre on himself anith no less than eleven bayonet wounds. After Mahone drove the enemy from the captured mine and ret[3 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
there, following up, as near as possible, the direction of the Emmetsburg road. My corps occupied our right, with Hood on the extreme right, and McLaws next. Hill's Corps was next to mine, in front of the Federal centre, and Ewell was on our extreme left. My corps, with Pickett's Division absent, numbered hardly thirteen thousand men. I realized that the fight was to be a fearful one; but being assured that my flank would be protected by the brigades of Wilcox, Perry, Wright, Posey, and Mahone, moving en echelon, and that Ewell was to co-operate by a direct attack on the enemy's right, and Hill to threaten his centre, and attack if opportunity offered, and thus prevent reinforcements from being launched either against myself or Ewell, it seemed possible that we might possibly dislodge the great army in front of us. At half-past 3 o'clock the order was given General Hood to advance upon the enemy, and, hurrying to the head of McLaws' Division, I moved with his line. Then was fairl
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
or that the early employment of those who were thereafter to be the leaders of their respective sides should seem ludicrously small, in the light of subsequent events. Jackson was given, in the outset, the humble position of major of engineers; Mahone was ordered to take charge of the quartermasters' supplies in Virginia. Hill was first created a lieutenant colonel, but, shortly afterward, was assigned, with full grade, to the Thirteenth Infantry, and was ordered to the Upper Potomac, where, movements against Lee's communications. It was Hill's Corps that rolled Warren's line up like a scroll on the Weldon Railroad. It was I-Hill, with Heth and Wilcox, who overcame that bold Captain Hancock at Reams' Station. It was Hill who, with Mahone's Division, sent Hancock and Warren reeling for support from Hatcher's run. Everywhere and always, Hill was in the post of danger and won glory. Steadfast, alert, valiant, he never put his harness off, and always wore it well. Through that l
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
. Daniel's Brigade. (i) Brig.-Gen. Geo. Dole's Brigade. (k) Brig.-Gen. S. D. Ramseur's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. C. A. Battle's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. R. D. Johnston's Brigade. (f).. Third Army corps: Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Hill, Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Wm. Mahone's division. (l) Brig.-Gen. J. C. C. Sanders' Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Mahone's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. N. H. Harris's Brigade. (m) Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Joseph Finegan's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. M. Wilcox's division. BriBrig.-Gen. Mahone's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. N. H. Harris's Brigade. (m) Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Joseph Finegan's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. C. M. Wilcox's division. Brig.-Gen. E. L. Thomas's Brigade. (n) Brig.-Gen. James H. Lane's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Alfred M. Scale's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. H. Heth's division. (o) Brig.-Gen. J. R. Davis's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. John R. Cooke's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. D. McRae's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. J. J. Archer's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. H. H. Walker's Brigade. Unattached: 5th Alabama Battalion. Cavalry corps: Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton, Commanding. (p) Maj.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's divis
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 7: Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks. (search)
and capture or dislodge them. With the other regiments, General Wilcox was ordered by the Williamsburg road to report to General Hill, Pryor's brigade to follow him, Colston's brigade to support the move under Colonel Moore. Armistead's and Mahone's brigades, of Huger's division, were sent to R. H. Anderson, who was ordered to put them in his position and move his other regiments to the front. Colonel Moore hurried his leading companies into the turning move against Berry's brigade befton near the stage road (Williamsburg). They made blazing fires of pine-knots to dry their clothing and blankets, and these lighted reinforcing Union troops to their lines behind the railroad. The brigades of Huger's division (Armistead's and Mahone's) were near the left. Pickett was ordered to report to General Hill at daylight, also the batteries of Maurin, Stribling, and Watson. It was past eleven o'clock when all things were made ready and the killed and wounded cared for; then I rode
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 8: Sequels of Seven Pines. (search)
my's line fully exposed, would find the field fine for his batteries, and put them in practice without orders from his commander, and, breaking the enemy's line by an enfilade fire from his artillery, would come into battle and give it cohesive power. I left Headquarters at three o'clock, and after an hour's repose rode to the front to find General Hill. Wilcox's brigade was on my right on the return front, Pryor's brigade on his left, and R. H. Anderson, Kemper, Colston, Armistead, and Mahone occupied the line between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Pickett's brigade was ordered to be with General Hill at daylight, and Maurin's, Stribling's, and Watson's batteries, of Pickett's brigade, to take position on the right of Armistead's. I found General Hill before he had his breakfast, enjoying the comforts of Casey's camp. Pickett had passed and was in search of his position, which was soon disclosed by a fusillade from the front of Richardson's division. A party of b
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 15: the Maryland campaign. (search)
Ridge. From the top of this gap is a rugged way along the ridge leading down to its southern projections and limits, by which infantry only could find foothold. That southern point is called Maryland Heights. Two brigades-Kershaw's and Barksdale's — under General Kershaw were ordered to ascend Elk Ridge, march along its summit, driving off opposition, and capture the enemy's position on the heights. General Semmes was left near the pass, over which the troops had marched with his own and Mahone's brigades, the latter under Colonel Parham with orders to send a brigade to the top of Solomon's Gap to cover Kershaw's rear. General Wright, of Anderson's division, was ordered with his brigade and two pieces of artillery along the crest ridge of South Mountain to its projection over Riverton. General Cobb was ordered with his brigade along the base of Elk Ridge, to be abreast of Kershaw's column. With the balance of his command, General McLaws moved down the Valley by the South Mountai
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 17: preliminaries of the great battle. (search)
inking that there might be something more important at that point, he rode himself to Maryland Heights to see General McLaws, and to witness the operations at Harper's Ferry, posting Colonel Munford with two regiments of cavalry, two regiments of Mahone's brigade under Colonel Parham, part of the Tenth Georgia Infantry, Chew's battery of four guns, and a section of navy howitzers, to guard the pass. The infantry regiments were posted behind stone walls at the base of the mountain, the cavalry d of arms, and one gun were their trophies in this affair. General Franklin's total loss was five hundred and thirty-three. Rebellion Record, vol. XIX. part i. p. 183. General McLaws had ordered General Cobb's brigade and the other regiments of Mahone's to reinforce the troops at the gap, but they only came up as the Federals were making their sweeping charge, and were driven back with their discomfited comrades. General Semmes's brigade at the Brownsville Pass, a mile south, with five or six
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
ampbell and Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims and Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Artillery, Maj. S. P. Hamilton, Col. H. C. Cabell; Manly's (N. C.) battery, Capt. B. C. Manly; Pulaski (Ga.) Art., Capt. J. P. W. Read; Richmond (Fayette) Art., Capt. M. C. Macon; Richmond Howitzers (1st Co.), Capt. E. S. McCarthy; Troup (Ga.) Art., Capt. H. H. Carlton. Anderson's Division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson:--Wilcox's Brigade, Col. Alfred Cumming; 8th, 9th, 10th, and 11th Ala. Mahone's Brigade, Col. William A. Parham; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, Col. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., 16th Miss., Capt. A. M. Feltus; 19th Miss., 2d Miss. Battn. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead, Col. J. G. Hodges; 9th, 14th, 38th, 53d, and 57th Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor; 14th Ala., 2d and 8th Fla., 3d Va. Right's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 44th Ala., 3d, 22d, and 48th Ga. Artillery, Ma
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
Read's (Ga.) battery, Richmond Howitzers (1st), McCarthy's battery; Troup (Ga.) Art. (Carlton's battery). Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson:--Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox; 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 14th Ala. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston; 12th, 16th, 19th, and 48th Miss. (5 cos.). Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 3d (Col. Edward J. Walker), 22d, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Va. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston; 12th, 16th, 19th, and 48th Miss. (5 cos.). Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright; 3d (Col. Edward J. Walker), 22d, 48th (Capt. M. R. Hall), and 2d Ga. Battn. (Capt. C. J. Moffett). Perry's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. A. Perry; 2d, 5th, and 8th Fla., Capt. David Lang, Capt. Thomas R. Love. Artillery, Donaldsonville (La.) Art., Capt. V. Maurin; Huger's (Va.) battery, Capt. Frank Huger; Lewis's (Va.) battery, Capt. John W. Lewis; Norfolk (Va.) Light Art. Blues, Lieut. William T. Peet. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett :--Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett; 8th, 18th, 19th, 28th, and
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