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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 8 6 Browse Search
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Northern hands; he was offered chief command in the field; but he abandoned all, and, bereft of every thing, offered himself to his native State. Johnston, Beauregard, Van Dorn, Evans, Longstreet, Ewell, and a host of others, made similar sacrifices, and for a long time were without any settled rank or command. They had to fight their way up, and have successfully done so. The same may be said of the navy. Lynch, Tatnall, Ingraham, Hollins, and others, followed their illustrious example. Maury — the world-renowed Maury-had all to lose and nothing to gain by joining our cause; but he did so, and refusing the offers and hospitalities of kings and princes, busied himself, industriously, in any department where his services might be of value. Hollins, indeed, brought his ship with him, and was cursed for it from east to west by the North. We cannot expect to do much with our navy at present, but we have talent enough in the forthcoming times of peace to found a navy which shall ecli
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, May, 1863. (search)
city, built on a sandy flat, and covering a deal of ground for its population, which is about 25,000. I called on General Maury, for whom I brought a letter of introduction from General Johnston. He is a very gentlemanlike and intelligent but d energy of the Mobilians, as it has been constructed since the commencement of the war. During the trip, I overheard General Maury soliloquizing over a Yankee flag, and saying, Well, I never should have believed that I could have lived to see the day in which I should detest that old flag. He is cousin to Lieutenant Maury, who has distinguished himself so much by his writings, on physical geography especially. The family seems to be a very military one. His brother is captain of the Confederate steamer Georgia. After landing, I partook of a hasty dinner with General Maury and Major Cummins. I was then mounted on the General's horse, and was sent to gallop round the land defences with Brigadier-general Slaughter and his Staff. By
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
by General Beauregard-viz., that ironclads cannot resist the plunging fire of forts, even though that latter can only boast of the old smooth-bore guns. A Captain Maury took me on board the Richmond ironclad, in which vessel I saw a 7-inch treble-banded Brook gun, weighing, they told me, 21,000 lbs., and capable of standing a charge of 25 lbs. of powder. Amongst my fellow-passengers from Richmond I had observed a very Hibernian-looking prisoner in charge of one soldier. Captain Maury informed me that this individual was being taken to Chaffin's Bluff, where he is to be shot at 12 noon to-morrow for desertion. Major Norris and I bathed in James Ri been trained into excellent and zealous Staff officers. Lawley is to live with three doctors on the Headquarter Staff: their names are Cullen, Barksdale, and Maury; they form a jolly trio, and live much more luxuriously than their generals. Major Moses tells me that his orders are to open the stores in Chambersburg by for
often very difficult to restrain officers and men from crossing the Rio Grande with hostile purpose. Within the knowledge of my troops, there had gone on formerly the transfer of organized bodies of ex-Confederates to Mexico, in aid of the Imperialists, and at this period it was known that there was in preparation an immigration scheme having in view the colonizing, at Cordova and one or two other places, of all the discontented elements of the defunct Confederacy-Generals Price, Magruder, Maury, and other high personages being promoters of the enterprise, which Maximilian took to readily. He saw in it the possibilities of a staunch support to his throne, and therefore not only sanctioned the project, but encouraged it with large grants of land, inspirited the promoters with titles of nobility, and, in addition, instituted a system of peonage, expecting that the silver hook thus baited would be largely swallowed by the Southern people. The announcement of the scheme was followe
demonstration from the north on central Alabama, to attempt the reduction of Mobile and its remaining defenses, See page 650. now held, under Dick Taylor, by Gen. Maury, with a force estimated at 15,000 men. The forces employed by Gen. Canby consisted of the 13th and 16th corps aforesaid, with a division of cavalry and one oebels lay stretched beside them. Mobile was lost and won. It could no longer be held; so its evacuation commenced on the 10th, and was completed on the 11th. Gen. Maury fled up the Alabama, with 9,000 men, leaving 4,000 prisoners in our hands; while 1,000 more were found in the city, when, at 2 P. M. of the 12th, the flag of th and one transport — all sunk by torpedoes. The guns captured in the city and its defenses numbered 150. The powerful rams Huntsville and Tuscaloosa were sunk by Maury before the evacuation. The Rebel ram W. H. Webb, from Red river, freighted with cotton, rosin, &c., came down the Mississippi past New Orleans April 24. so
e into, and proclamation, 193-4. Maryland Heights, held by Ford, 196; prisoners and guns captured at, 202. Mason, J, M., allusion to, 81. Massachusetts volunteers killed in Baltimore, 514. Mathews, Col. Stanley, routs Wheeler, 272. Maury, Gen., defends Mobile, 721; his retreat and losses, 724. Max Meadows, Gillem destroys railroad at, 688. McArthur, Gen., at Corinth, 226. McCall, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 155; at Malvern Hill, 562; taken prisoner, 563. McCallum, Gen. D., 220. Mitchellsville, Morgan's raid on, 271. Mix, Col. S. H., killed at Petersburg, Va., 585. Mobile Bay, the fight in, 641; the outer defenses of, 649; map of the defenses of, 650. Mobile, Ala., preparations for attack on, 721; 722; Maury abandons, 724. Monitor, arrival of the, at Fortress Monroe, 118; fight of, with the Merrimac, 118; 119. Monocacy, Lew Wallace defeated at the, 603. Monroe, John T., Mayor of New Orleans, refuses to surrender the city, 95-6; his letters t
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
h, Miss. Includes loss at Hatchie Bridge, October 5th.             Oct 3-5, 1862.             6th Texas Phifer's Maury's 55 63 30 148 35th Mississippi Moore's Maury's 32 110 347 489 6th Missouri Green's Hebert's 31 130 53 214 2d MiMaury's 32 110 347 489 6th Missouri Green's Hebert's 31 130 53 214 2d Missouri Gates's Hebert's 19 122 21 162 43d Mississippi Green's Hebert's 13 56 156 225 21st Arkansas Cabell's Maury's 27 41 58 126 Jones's Ark. Battalion Cabell's Maury's 36 43 11 90 37th Missisippi -------- Hebert's 19 62 -- 81 ChaplinMaury's 27 41 58 126 Jones's Ark. Battalion Cabell's Maury's 36 43 11 90 37th Missisippi -------- Hebert's 19 62 -- 81 Chaplin Hills, Ky.             Oct. 8, 1862.             16th Tennessee Donelson's Cheatham's 41 151 7 199 1st Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 49 129 1 179 9th Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 32 114 8 154 41st Georgia Maney's Cheatham's 23 125 3 1Maury's 36 43 11 90 37th Missisippi -------- Hebert's 19 62 -- 81 Chaplin Hills, Ky.             Oct. 8, 1862.             16th Tennessee Donelson's Cheatham's 41 151 7 199 1st Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 49 129 1 179 9th Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 32 114 8 154 41st Georgia Maney's Cheatham's 23 125 3 151 27th Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 16 81 11 108 31st Tennessee Stewart's Cheatham's 17 78 5 100 6th Tennessee Maney's Cheatham's 16 64 11 91 5th Tennessee Stewart's Cheatham's 14 64 12 90 Pocotaligo, S.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
wagons, which Major L. Mims, who was at the head of the quartermaster's department in the State, was instructed to procure by impressment as needed. The same arrangements were made for the rebuilding of the railroad-bridge at Jackson. Major-General Maury, who commanded at Mobile, reported that he had but two thousand infantry, ten field-pieces, and five hundred mounted troops for the defense of the works on the land-side of the place. According to the estimate that accompanied this reporters at West Point and Atlanta. All the infantry in the department would have been sent to the assistance of the Army of Tennessee but for the supposed probability of the investment of Mobile by the enemy. According to the estimates of Major-General Maury, and his chief-engineer, Brigadier-General Leadbetter, fifteen thousand infantry would be necessary for the defense of the place on the land-side in the event of a siege. He had but two thousand; and they and the troops remaining in Missi
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
ield-transportation will require a good deal of time. None can be obtained within the limits of my authority. There has been an unnecessary accumulation of bread-stuffs and corn at Mobile-six months supply for a much larger force than Major-General Maury's. Half of it will spoil during the summer, if left in Mobile. It would be economical, therefore, as well as convenient, to transfer that portion of it to this army. Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, at Augusta, informs me that the artillery-hy. This was the entire strength of the army, at and near Dalton, at that time. Canty's brigade (thirteen hundred and ninety-five effectives) is included improperly. It had just arrived at Rome, sent there from the vicinity of Mobile, by Major-General Maury. But, on the other hand, Mercer's was not; nor was Martin's division of cavalry, then near Cartersville, because its horses, worn down by continuous hard service since the beginning of the previous summer, were unfit for the field. It ha
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
tfully ask your Excellency's attention to the accompanying letter of Major-General Smith in relation to the inadequacy of the garrison of Vicksburg, begging you to take his estimate of the force needed instead of mine, as his is based upon accurate calculation. Most respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. Jackson, January 2, 1863. Mr. President: General Pemberton continues to command at Vicksburg. He has asked for all the troops here, after being reenforced by Maury's division, in addition to those brigades agreed upon between us. The line of twelve miles to Snyder's Mills probably requires them all. I fear difficulty of subsisting them, however. A report just handed in by the inspecting officers shows that the supply of provision is much smaller than General Pemberton supposed. The place may be reduced, I fear, in consequence of this; or, should it be invested, we shall not have a sufficient force to break the investment. Grant is still on the Ta
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