hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 9 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 5 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 166 results in 81 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 47 (search)
suffrages of the people. They will not offend the speculators and hoarders by taking much flour from them. No — domiciliary visits with bayonets alone will suffice. Of thirty Federal deserters sent to work on the fortifications of Lynchburg, all but four ran away. It is understood that the President announced to Congress today the arrest of the Hon. H. S. Foote, member of that body, near Fredericksburg, while attempting to pass into the enemy's lines. This, then, may have been Capt. Norton's secret mission; and I believe the government had traps set for him at other places of egress. Meantime the enemy came in at Savannah. This is considered the President's foible — a triumph over a political or personal enemy will occupy his attention and afford more delight than an ordinary victory over the common enemy. Most men will say Mr. Foote should have been permitted to go — if he desired it. January 14 Cloudy and cool. The news that Goldsborough, N. C., had been taken i<
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
ll the northern Congressional Districts and County Conventions, I had not noticed whether or not they had been adopted by any State Convention. In 1856, a debate arose in Congress between Major Thomas L. Harris of the Springfield District, and Mr. Norton, of the Joliet District, on political matters connected with our State, in the course of which, Major Harris quoted those resolutions as having been passed by the first Republican State Convention that ever assembled in Illinois. I knew that Major Harris was remarkable for his accuracy, that he was a very conscientious and sincere man, and I also noticed that Norton did not question the accuracy of this statement. I therefore took it for granted that it was so, and the other day when I concluded to use the resolutions at Ottawa, I wrote to Charles H. Lanphier, editor of the State Register, at Springfield calling his attention to them, telling him that I had been informed that Major Harris was lying sick at Springfield, and desiring
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fifth joint debate, at Galesburgh, October 7, 1858. (search)
, What was to be done with him? Take the eels out and set him again ; so Harris and Douglas have shown a disposition to take the eels out of that stale fraud by which they gained Harris's election, and set the fraud again more than once. On the 9th of July, 1856, Douglas attempted a repetition of it upon Trumbull on the floor of the Senate of the United States, as will appear from the appendix of the Congressional Globe of that date. On the 9th of August, Harris attempted it again upon Norton in the House of Representatives, as will appear by the same documents — the appendix to the Congressional Globe of that date. On the 21st of August last, all three--Lanphier, Douglas and Harris — reattempted it upon me at Ottawa. It has been clung to and played out again and again as an exceedingly high trump by this blessed trio. And now that it has been discovered publicly to be a fraud, we find that Judge Douglas manifests no surprise at it at all. He makes no complaint of Lanphier, wh
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Sixth joint debate, at Quincy, October 13, 1858. (search)
not investigate it, if he did not ; and if he did, why he wont tell the result. I call upon him for that. This is the third time that Judge Douglas has assumed that he learned about these resolutions by Harris's attempting to use them against Norton on the floor of Congress. I tell Judge Douglas the public records of the country show that he himself attempted it upon Trumbull a month before Harris tried them on Norton — that Harris had the opportunity of learning it from him, rather than heNorton — that Harris had the opportunity of learning it from him, rather than he from Harris. I now ask his attention to that part of the record on the case. My friends, I am not disposed to detain you longer in regard to that matter. I am told that I still have five minutes left. There is another matter I wish to call attention to. He says, when he discovered there was a mistake in that case, he came forward magnanimously, without my calling his attention to it, and explained it. I will tell you how he became so magnanimous. When the newspapers of our side had disc
y are put in the hands of the clergy for their benefit; this money is disbursed by ladies, whose duty and pleasure it is to relieve the suffering. One gentleman gave as much as $5,000 last winter. Besides this, the industrious poor are supplied with work by the Government, and regularly paid for it. The Bishop set off this morning for his spring visitations, which are becoming, alas! very circumscribed-so much of the diocese is in the hands of the enemy. Mr. C., of Georgetown, Captain Norton, of New Orleans, and Mr. A. S. are with us. The first of these gentlemen ran the blockade from his home some months ago, finding he was to be arrested for opinion's sake, and now holds a Confederate office in Richmond. He very rarely hears from his wife and children. Flag-of-truce letters seldom reach their destination, and when they do, letters of one page, written to be inspected by strangers, are very unsatisfactory. An occasional underground communication comes to him, like water
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
ed to Washington that this result had been accomplished, and that a thousand prisoners had surrendered. The whole country was thrilled by the good news, for it seemed as if a way was about to be opened for the relief and the arming of the suffering loyalists in East Tennessee. Truth soon told a different story. Nelson had moved on the 9th with his main column This was composed of the greater portions of the Second, Twenty-first, and Fifty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, under Colonels Harris, Norton, and Tyffe; a battalion of Kentucky volunteers, commanded by Colonel C. A. Marshall, and two sections of artillery, in charge of Captain Konkle. directly toward Pikeville, twenty-eight miles distant, a battalion of Kentucky volunteers, under Colonel C. A. Marshall, in advance. They met picket-guards eight miles from that village. The road now lay along a narrow shelf cut in a high mountain side, ending in a steep ridge at Ivy Creek, which bent around it. There lay the Confederates in ambus
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
e impassable without being rebridged. This I caused to be done, under the direction of Lieut. H. C. Freeman, engineer of the corps. Nor should I omit to state that during this march I received an order to send back a detachment of cavalry, under instructions, to proceed to the most convenient bridge across Owl Creek, and thence to the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, at or near Bethel, for the purpose of destroying it. In conveying this order amid the storm and the press of troops and trains, Captain Norton, my acting assistant adjutant-general, coming in contact with a miry, floundering horse, met with the misfortune of having one of his legs broken; pressing on, however, he delivered the order. Lieut. Col. William McCullough, with the small available force at hand, consisting of only 250 Illinois mounted men, started about nightfall, and marching through rain and mire all night 17 miles came to the road, and dismounting his men under the enemy's fire, destroyed three bridges, a portio
districts, etc. etc.--was passed, under the Previous Question-Yeas 136; Nays--Messrs. Burnett, (Ky.,) Harding, (Ky.,) Norton, (Mo..) George H. Pendleton, (Ohio,) Reid, (Mo.,) Robinson, (Ill.,) Vallandigham, (Ohio,) Voorhees, (Ind.,) Wadsworth, (Kthe gentleman from Indiana. The bill passed under the previous question: Yeas 150; Nays--Messrs. Burnett, of Ky., Norton and Reid, of Mo., Vallandigham, of Ohio, and B. Wood, of N. Y. [The three first-named went over to the Rebels soon after l authority everywhere within the limits and jurisdiction of the United States. Nays--Messrs. Burnett, Grider, (Ky.,) Norton, Reid, and Wood--5. Mr. Potter, of Wise., offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Committee aight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vall
63. The Emancipation bill was next taken up; when, after rejecting several amendments, the vote was taken on its passage, and it was defeated: Yeas 74 (all Republicans); Nays 78--fifteen members elected as Republicans voting Nay, with all the Democrats and all the Border-State men. The Republicans voting Nay were Messrs. Dawes and Delano, of Mass., Diven, of N. Y., Dunn, of Ind., Fisher, of Del., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Killinger, of Pa., Mitchell, of Ind., Nixon, of N. J., Norton, of Ill., Porter, of Ind., A. H. Rice, of Mass., Stratton, of N. J., and Train, of Mass. Mr. Porter, of Ind., now moved May 27. a reconsideration; which narrowly escaped defeat, on a motion by Mr. Holman that it do lie on the table: Yeas 69; Nays 73. The reconsideration prevailed: Yeas 84; Nays 64: and the bill was recommitted, with instructions to report a substitute already proposed by Mr. P., which prevailed — Yeas 84; Nays 66: and Mr. Eliot again reported June 17. a bill emanci
ersey--Starr. Pennsylvania--Baily, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Kelley, McAllister, Moorhead, A. Myers, L. Myers, C. O'Neill, Schofield, Stevens, Thayer, Tracy, Williams. Delaware--Smithers. Maryland--Cresswell, Henry Winter Davis, F. Thomas, Webster. West Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley. Kentucky--Anderson, Randall, Smith, Yeaman. Ohio — Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding. Indiana--Colfax, Dumont, Julian, Orth. Illinois--Arnold, Farnsworth, Ingersoll, Norton, E. B. Washburne. Missouri--Blow, Boyd, King, Knox, Loan, McClurg, J. S. Rollins. Michigan--A. C. Baldwin, Beaman, Driggs, F. W. Kellogg, Longyear, Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wilder. Oregon--McBride. Nevada--Worthington. California--Cole, Higby, Shannon.--Total, 119. Nays--[All Democrats.] Maine--Sweat. New York — Brooks, Chanler, Kal<
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...