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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 9 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 6 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 6 2 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Paley or search for Paley in all documents.

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toral pleasures of the plantation, and the patriarchal felicities of the Blacks. There was the lawyer pleading that, in certain cases, the Habeas Corpus is good for nothing. And under all there were crowds of prejudiced and unreasoning men of every social grade, from the highest to the lowest, who denounced every objector to this condition of affairs as a destructive and a radical, and who thought a flourishing trade with the South worth all the morality ever propounded, from Plutarch to Dr. Paley. It would, doubtless, have been easier — I know it would often have been thought in better taste — to have taken a low and despairing view of public affairs, and sadly to have predicted the second coming of chaos. But, partly perhaps from a constitutional habit, I was led to consider serious subjects cheerfully; although I hardly ever made a jest upon the subject of Slavery without a feeling of self-rebuke. But it must be remembered that the gentlemen upon the other side were already
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Slaveholding Utopia. (search)
deemed forever abolished by advancing Christianity! It may be thought by those who have given an insufficient attention to the subject, that we are speaking somewhat extravagantly; but if we are deceived, then the best thinkers in the world, since the promulgation of Christianity, have been deceived also. This we are aware is not the place for voluminous or elaborate citation; but we venture to refer to a writer so well known, and so little likely to be carried away by his emotions, as Dr. Paley, who says, Christianity has triumphed over Slavery established in the Roman Empire, and I trust will one day prevail against the worse Slavery of the West Indies. So, too, Dr. Priestly: Christianity has bettered the state of the world in a civil and political respect, giving men a just idea of their mutual relations, and thereby gradually abolishing Slavery with the servile ideas which introduced it, and also many cruel and barbarous customs. So, too, Dr. Robertson: It is not the author
arty in260 Mallory, Secretary280 McClellan, General, as a Pacificator370 Mercury, The Charleston399 Netherlands, Deacon17 North, Southern Notions of the144 Olivieri, The Abbe, on Negro Education56 Pierce, Franklin29 Pollard, Mr., his Mammy 63 Palfrey, General, in Boston73 Perham, Josiah, his Invitation97 Parker, E. G., his Life of Choate108 Patents Granted in the South134 Polk, Bishop172 Parties, Extemporizing242 Platform Novelties in Boston247 Paley, Dr., on Slavery808 Pitt, William, an Abolitionist329 Rogersville, the Great Flogging in16 Roundheads and Cavaliers151 Russell, William H158, 187 Repudiation of Northern Debts162 Red Bill, a New Orleans Patriarch318 Romilly, Sir Samuel828 Robertson, Dr., on Slavery803 Screws, Benjamin, Negro Broker8, 88 Society for Promoting National Unity186 Stevens, Alexander H148 Secession, The Ordinance of178 Slidell, Miss204 Secessionists, The Dissensions of219