hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 16 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 6 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham). You can also browse the collection for Eretria (Greece) or search for Eretria (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham), chapter 15 (search)
drew—; and first he collected a settlement at a place near the Gulf of Thermae called Rhaecelus, but from there he went on to the neighborhood of Pangaeus, from where he got money and hired soldiers, and in the eleventh year went again to Eretria, and now for the first time set about an attempt to recover his power by force, being supported in this by a number of people, especially the Thebans and Lygdamis of Naxos, and also the knights who controlled the government of Eretria. WiEretria. Winning the battle of Pallenis,The deme Pallene, dedicated to Athena Pallenis, lay just N.E. of Athens. he seized the government and disarmed the people; and now he held the tyranny firmly, and he took Naxos and appointed Lygdamis ruler. The way in which he disarmed the people was this: he held an armed muster at the Temple of Theseus, and began to hold an Assembly, but he lowered his voice a little, and when they said they could not hear him, he told them to come up to the forecourt of
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham), chapter 33 (search)
The constitution of the Four Hundred lasted perhaps four months, for two of which Mnesilochus was archon, in the year of the archonship of Theopompus, who received the office for the remaining ten months. But when they had been worsted in the naval battle off Eretria and the whole of Euboea except Oreum had revolted, they were more distressed at the misfortune than by any previous disaster (for they were actually getting more support from Euboea than from Attica), and they dissolved the Four Hundred and handed over affairs to the Five Thousand that were on the armed roll,Cf. Aristot. Ath. Pol. 4.2, Aristot. Ath. Pol. 29.5. having passed by vote a resolution that no office should receive pay. The persons chiefly responsible for the dissolution were Aristocrates and Theramenes, who disapproved of the proceedings of the Four Hundred; for they did everything on their own responsibility and referred nothing to the Five Thousand. But Athens seems to have been well gove