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Pausanias, Description of Greece 30 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Colophon or search for Colophon in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 4, section 1290b (search)
. being few govern the majority who are not of free birth, as for instance at Apollonia on the Ionian Gulf and at Thera (for in each of these cities the offices of honor were filled by the specially noble families who had been the first settlers of the colonies, and these were few out of many), nor is it a democracyPerhaps the Greek should be altered here to give ‘an oligarchy.’ if the rich rule because they are in a majority, as in ancient times at Colophon (for there the majority of the population owned large property before the war against the Lydians took place), but it is a democracy when those who are free are in the majority and have sovereignty over the government, and an oligarchy when the rich and more well bornare few and sovereign. It has then been stated that there are several forms of constitution, and what is the cause of this; but let us take the starting-point that was laid down before
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1303b (search)
ors) 1301b 26. Also states sometimes enter on faction for geographical reasons, when the nature of the country is not suited for there being a single city, as for example at ClazomenaeTopography uncertain: Clazomenae near Smyrna was partly on a small island, which Alexander joined to the mainland with a causeway. the people near Chytrum are in feud with the inhabitants of the island, and the Colophonians and the NotiansNotium was the port of Colophon.; and at Athens the population is not uniformly democratic in spirit, but the inhabitants of Piraeus are more so than those of the city. For just as in wars the fording of watercourses, even quite small ones, causes the formations to lose contact, so every difference seems to cause division. Thus perhaps the greatest division is that between virtue and vice, next that between wealth and poverty, and so with other differences in varying degree, one of which