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Pausanias, Description of Greece 384 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 24 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 14 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Olympia (Greece) or search for Olympia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aristotle, Politics, Book 2, section 1274a (search)
an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because of his loathing for the passion of his mother Alcyone, he went away to Thebes, and there they both ended their life. Even now people still show their tombs, in full view of each other and one of them fully open to view in the direction of the Corinthian country but the other one not; for the story goes that they arranged to be buried in this manner, Diocles owing to his hatred for his misfortune securing that the land
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1313b (search)
ardApparently this means a citizen force side by side with the tyrant's mercenaries; a variant gives ‘in order that the (tyrant's) guard may be kept.’may not be kept, and also that the people being busy with their daily affairs may not have leisure to plot against their ruler. Instances of this are the pyramids in Egypt and the votive offerings of the Cypselids,Cypselus and his son Periander (1310b 29 n., 1284a 26 n.) dedicated a colossal statue of Zeus at Olympia and other monuments there and at Delphi. and the building of the temple of Olympian Zeus by the PisistratidaePisistratus is said to have begun the temple of Olympian Zeus at Athens, not finished till the time of Hadrian. and of the temples at Samos, works of PolycratesTyrant of Samos, d. 522 B.C. (for all these undertakings produce the same effect, constant occupation and poverty among the subject people); and the levying of taxes, as at