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M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 202 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 138 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 124 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 124 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 52 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 44 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 40 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 34 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for Syracuse (Italy) or search for Syracuse (Italy) in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
of Corinth. which was led out by Evanthes only a little while after the founding of Croton and Syracuse.Croton and Syracuse were founded, respectively, in 710 and 734 B.C. According to Diod. Sic. 4.Syracuse were founded, respectively, in 710 and 734 B.C. According to Diod. Sic. 4.24, Heracles had unintentionally killed Croton and had foretold the founding of a famous city on the site, the same to be named after Croton. Ephorus is wrong in calling it a colony of the Locri Opune." and Myscellus came back and founded Croton, having as an associate Archias, the founder of Syracuse, who happened to sail up while on his way to found Syracuse.The generally accepted dates for the founding of Croton and Syracuse are, respectively, 710 B.C. and 734 B.C. But Strabo's account here seems to mean that Syracuse was founded immediately after Croton (cp. 6. 2. 4). Cp. also ThucydidSyracuse was founded immediately after Croton (cp. 6. 2. 4). Cp. also Thucydides 6. 3. 2 The Iapyges used to live at Croton in earlier times, as Ephorus says. And the city is reputed to have cultivated warfare and athletics; at any rate, in one Olympian festival the seven me
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
ifty. Thence again along the third side: to Syracuse thirty-six, and to Catana sixty; then to Tauthis direction as one proceeds from Catana to Syracuse and Pachynus. Now the distance from Pachynust, Messene, and then Tauromenium, Catana, and Syracuse; but those that were between Catana and SyraSyracuse have disappeared—NaxusFounded about 734 B.C. and destroyed by Dionysius in 403 B.C. (see Diod. uality that is peculiarly suited to the vine. Syracuse was founded by Archias, who sailed from Corinalthful, as I have related,6. 1. 12. and that Syracuse fell into such exceptional wealth that the na took them up and in common with them founded Syracuse. And the city grew, both on account of the fence of its harbors. Furthermore, the men of Syracuse proved to have the gift of leadership, with ts later on ejected the Carthaginians and took Syracuse by siege. And in our own time, because Pompes, wool, and the like. Poseidonius says that Syracuse and Eryx are each situated like an acropolis [4 more...]
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
a Luecanian about 330 B.C. (cp. 6. 1. 5). the Molossian to lead them in their war against the Messapians and Leucanians, and, still before that, for Archidamus,Archidamus III, king of Sparta, was born about 400 B.C. and lost his life in 338 B.C. in this war. the son of Agesilaüs, and, later on, for Cleonymus,Little is know of this Cleonymus, save that he was the son of Cleomenes II, who reigned at Sparta 370-309 B.C. and Agathocles,Agathocles (b. about 361 B.C.—d. 289 B.C.) was a tyrant of Syracuse. He appears to have led the Tarantini about 300 B.C. and then for Pyrrhus,Pyrrhus (about 318-272 B.C.), king of Epeirus, accepted the invitation of Tarentum in 281 B.C. at the time when they formed a league with him against the Romans. And yet even to those whom they called in they could not yield a ready obedience, and would set them at enmity. At all events, it was out of enmity that Alexander tried to transfer to Thurian territory the general festival assembly of all Greek peoples in