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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 49 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 33 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 33 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 21 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 13 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for Sturgis or search for Sturgis in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 6 document sections:

General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
lton, ordered to join Reno, and Heintzelman's (Third) corps, ten thousand strong, at Warrenton Junction. The Sixth (Franklin's) Corps, ten thousand strong, Army of the Potomac, was at Alexandria awaiting transportation, as were the divisions of Sturgis, ten thousand, and Cox, seven thousand,--the latter from West Virginia. General Pope asked to have Franklin's corps march by the Warrenton turnpike to join him, and sent instructions to different parties to see that the guards in his rear were s Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, Sturgis's division, which joined him on the 26th, not included. In his rear was Jackson, 20,000; in front on the Rappahannock was my 25,000; R. H. Anderson's reserve division, 5000; total, 50,000, with 3000 of cavalry under Stuart. On the 26th I mo
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 16: the lost order --South Mountain. (search)
ive cross fire on Cox as he made his fight, and part of Colquitt's right regiments were put in, in aid of G. B. Anderson's men. About two P. M., General Cox was reinforced by the division under General Wilcox, and a little after three o'clock by Sturgis's division, the corps commander, General Reno, taking command with his last division under Rodman. As Sturgis's division came into the fight, the head of my column reached the top of the pass, where the brigades of G. T. Anderson and DraytonSturgis's division came into the fight, the head of my column reached the top of the pass, where the brigades of G. T. Anderson and Drayton, under General D. R. Jones, filed to the right to meet the battle, and soon after General Hood with two brigades. The last reinforcement braced the Confederate fight to a successful stand, and held it till after night in hot contest, in which many brave soldiers and valuable officers were lost on both sides. The fight was between eight brigades on the Union side, with a detachment of cavalry and superior artillery attachments, against two of D. H. Hill's and four of my brigades, with Ross
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
ide advanced his troops, General Crook's brigade, supported by General Sturgis's division, to the bridge and ford just above it. These were psion, moved with this column. Wilcox's division was in rear of Sturgis, in reserve, and near the left of Benjamin's battery. Clark's and ns in position to cover the bridge, and after some little time General Sturgis's division approached the bridge, led by Naglee's brigade. Thrried over, and organized for advance over Sharpsburg Heights, but Sturgis's division had suffered, and, the ammunition getting low, it was f necessary to replace it by the division under General Wilcox, and Sturgis was ordered to hold position near the bridge in reserve. The brig anxiously held. General Cox, reinforced by his reserve under General Sturgis, handled well his left against A. P. Hill; but, assailed in feut. Samuel N. Benjamin. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis:--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James Naglee; 2d Md., Lieut.-Col. J. E
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
brigades of Jenkins and Kemper of Pickett's division were called up and assigned, the former to General McLaws and the latter to General Ransom. A supply of ammunition was sent down to the troops in the road in time to meet the next attack, by Sturgis's division of the Ninth Corps, which made the usual brave fight, and encountered the same damaging results. Getty's division of the Ninth Corps came to his support on the left, but did not engage fiercely, losing less than eight hundred men. Carroll's brigade of Whipple's division, Third Corps, came in on Sturgis's left, but only to brace that part of the fight. As the troops hurried forward from the streets of the city for the Telegraph road, they came at once under the fire of the long-range guns on Lee's Hill. The thirty-pound Parrotts were particularly effective in having the range and dropping their shells in the midst of the columns as they dashed forward. Frequently commands were broken up by this fire and that of other
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 35: cut off from East and West. (search)
enemy all of this while, and the enemy was looking at them, both frequently burning powder between their lines. General Sturgis had been assigned to the cavalry of the other side to relieve General Shackelford, and he seemed to think that the dember 26, Longstreet will feel a little timid now, and will bear a little pushing. Under the fierce operations of General Sturgis's cavalry against General Martin's during the latter days of December, General W. E. Jones's cavalry was on guard for my right and rear towards Cumberland Gap. While Sturgis busied himself against our front and left, a raiding party rode from Cumberland Gap against the outposts of our far-off right, under Colonel Pridemore. As W. E. Jones was too far to support Martin's cavalry, he was called to closer threatenings against Cumberland Gap, that he might thus draw some of Sturgis's cavalry from our front to strengthen the forces at the Gap. Upon receipt of orders, General Jones crossed Clinch River in time
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 36: strategic importance of the field. (search)
eshly-quarried rocks, and the poorly protected feet of our soldiers sometimes left bloody marks along the roads. General Sturgis rode in advance of the army, and occupied Dandridge by Elliott's, Wolford's, and Garrard's divisions of cavalry and ake up the tedious rearward move. The army was ordered under arms, the cavalry was ordered concentrated in front of General Sturgis, and the divisions of Jenkins and B. R. Johnson and Alexander's batteries were marched to join General Martin. McLammand to speed their march as much as they could without severe trial. When General Martin made his bold advance General Sturgis thought to ride around by a considerable detour and strike at his rear, but in his ride was surprised to encounter Foster called for a pontoon bridge to make his crossing of the Holston at Strawberry Plains, which was ordered. General Sturgis could not approve the ride through Powell River Valley, and expressed preference for a route through the mountains o