hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 202 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 120 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 102 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 40 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 18 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 930 results in 258 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
iling from Malacca towards the East is not common for all men, as to China and Japan , and so forwards to go who will, but onely for the king of Portugall and his noages that the king of Portugall granteth to his nobles are these, of China and Japan , from China to Japan , and from Japan to China , and from China to the IndieJapan , and from Japan to China , and from China to the Indies, and the voyage of Bengala, Maluco, and Sonda, with the lading of fine cloth, and every sort of Bumbast cloth. Sonda is an Iland of the Moores neere to the coast ofJapan to China , and from China to the Indies, and the voyage of Bengala, Maluco, and Sonda, with the lading of fine cloth, and every sort of Bumbast cloth. Sonda is an Iland of the Moores neere to the coast of Java , and there they lade Pepper for China . The ship that goeth every yeere from the Indies to China , is called the ship of Drugs, because she carieth divers drugs silver. From Malacca to China is eighteene hundred miles: and from China to Japan goeth every yeere a shippe of great importance laden with Silke, which for retu barres of silver which they trucke in China . The distance betweene China and Japan is foure and twentie hundred miles, and in this way there are divers Ilands not
iling from Malacca towards the East is not common for all men, as to China and Japan , and so forwards to go who will, but onely for the king of Portugall and his noages that the king of Portugall granteth to his nobles are these, of China and Japan , from China to Japan , and from Japan to China , and from China to the IndieJapan , and from Japan to China , and from China to the Indies, and the voyage of Bengala, Maluco, and Sonda, with the lading of fine cloth, and every sort of Bumbast cloth. Sonda is an Iland of the Moores neere to the coast ofJapan to China , and from China to the Indies, and the voyage of Bengala, Maluco, and Sonda, with the lading of fine cloth, and every sort of Bumbast cloth. Sonda is an Iland of the Moores neere to the coast of Java , and there they lade Pepper for China . The ship that goeth every yeere from the Indies to China , is called the ship of Drugs, because she carieth divers drugs silver. From Malacca to China is eighteene hundred miles: and from China to Japan goeth every yeere a shippe of great importance laden with Silke, which for retu barres of silver which they trucke in China . The distance betweene China and Japan is foure and twentie hundred miles, and in this way there are divers Ilands not
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Ralph Fitch marchant of London by the way of Tripolis in Syria , to Ormus, and so to Goa in the East India, to Cambaia, and all the kingdome of Zelabdim Echebar the great Mogor, to the mighty river Ganges, and downe to Bengala, to Bacola, and Chonderi, to Pegu , to Imahay in the kingdome of Siam , and backe to Pegu , and from thence to Malacca, Zeilan, Cochin, and all the coast of the East India: begunne in the yeere of our Lord 1583, and ended 1591, wherein the strange rites, maners, and customes of those people, and the exceeding rich trade and commodities of those countries are faithfully set downe and diligently described, by the aforesaid M. Ralph Fitch. (search)
warres with the king of Achem which standeth in the Iland of Sumatra: from whence commeth great store of pepper and other spices every yeere to Pegu and Mecca within the Red sea, and other places. When the Portugals go from Macao in China to Japan , they carry much white silke, golde, muske, and porcelanes: and they bring from thence nothing but silver. They have a great caracke which goeth thither every yere, and she bringeth from thence every yere above sixe hundred thousand crusadoes: and all this silver of Japan , and two hundred thousand crusadoes more in silver which they bring yeerely out of India, they imploy to their great advantage in China : and they bring from thence golde, muske, silke, copper, porcelanes, and many other things very costly and gilded. When the Portugals come to Canton in China to traffike, they must remaine there but certaine dayes: and when they come in at the gate of the city, they must enter their names in a booke, and when they goe out at ni
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the Iland Japan, and other litle lies in the East Ocean. By R. Willes. (search)
s is the noble Iland Giapan, written otherwise Japon and Japan . This Island standeth in the East O China for his wisedome and learning, made in Japan for his gentry and birth, hath so large a Domi may he be accounted the wealthiest man in all Japan . For three causes this great Magistrate may los. Other five notable Universities there be in Japan , namely, Coia, Negru, Homi, Frenoi, and Bandu.e more pitie this Nation. The inhabiters of Japan , as men that never had greatly to doe with othaphy divided the whole world into three parts, Japan , Sian , and China . And albeit the Japans rece past (as in their olde recordes we finde) all Japan was subject unto one Emperour whose royall sea, and their authoritie is great throughout all Japan . The Cubucama useth them for Embassadors to de heads. Thus attyred they range abroade in all Japan , to set out themselves and their cunning to sane. Wherefore this place is so infamous in all Japan , that if any scholer of that order be happily [5 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the Iles beyond Japan in the way from China to the Moluccas . (search)
Of the Iles beyond Japan in the way from China to the Moluccas . AMONGST other Iles in the Asian sea betwixt Cantan a Chinish haven in Cathaio & the Moluccas , much spoken of in the Indian histories and painted out in Maps, Ainan and Santianum are very famous. Ainan standeth 19 degrees on this side of the Equinoctiall line nere China , from whence the Chinish nation hath their provision for shipping and other necessaries requisite for their Navie. There staied Balthasar Gagus a great traveller 5 moneths, who describeth that place after this maner. Ainan. is a goodly countrey ful of Indian fruits & all kind of victuals, besides great store of jewels and pearle, well inhabited, the townes built of stone, the people rude in conditions, apparelled in divers coloured rugs, with two oxe hornes, as it were, made of fine cypres hanging downe about their eares, and a paire of sharpe cyzers at their foreheads. The cause wherefore they go in such attire I could not understand, except
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An excellent treatise of the kingdome of China , and of the estate and government thereof: Printed in Latine at Macao a citie of the Portugals in China , An. Dom. 1590. and written Dialogue-wise. The speakers are Linus, Leo, and Michael. (search)
of blood: but all their cures, as ours also in Japon , are atchieved by fasting, decoctions of herbet from China to India, and to our countrey of Japon , that I heard say, that in one and the same shiculty, transport the same, not onely to us of Japon and into India, but also into sundry provincesne; the kingdome of China and our countrey of Japon may be compared together otherwise, all they great plenty of them into India, & to us of Japon . But who would beleeve, that there were so mucildren: and their literature being (as ours in Japon is also) in maner infinite, their children aree: and whatsoever knowledge in this arte we of Japon have, it is derived from them. LEO.We doe fretheir urbanity, it is much unlike unto ours in Japan , and unto that of Europe: howbeit under two prwhich are in China called Cen, but with us at Japon are named Bonzi. For this I doe briefly and byt of the bastonado: whereas in our lies of Japon it is farre otherwise, Priests, even of false [2 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
ed to Cape Comori, which is the headland or Promontorie of the maine of Malavar, and there to have lien off and on for such ships as should have passed from Zeilan, Sant Tome, Bengala, Pegu , Malacca, the Moluccos, the coast of China , and the Ile of Japan, which ships are of exceeding wealth and riches. But in our course we were very much deceived by the currents that set into the gulfe of the Red sea along the coast of Melinde. And the windes shortening upon us to the Northeast and Easterly, k to runne into the streights of Malacca to the Ilands called Pulo Sambilam, which are some five and fortie leagues Northward of the citie of Malacca, to which Ilands the Portugals must needs come from Goa or S. Thome, for the Malucos, China , and Japan . And when wee were there arrived, we lay too and agayne for such shipping as should come that way. Thus having spent some five dayes, upon a Sunday we espied a saile which was a Portugall ship that came from Negapatan a towne on the maine of In
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
t Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be open at 40. degrees elevation from the Island Japan, yea three hundred leagues Northerly above Japan : yet may there be land to hinder the thorow passage that way by Sea, as in the examples aforesaid it falleth out, Asia and America there being joyned together ine elevation of 63. degrees: he knewe no Ocean sea beyond Asia, yet have the Portugals trended the cape of Good hope at the South point of Afrike, and travelled to Japan an Island in the East Ocean, betweene Asia & America : our merchants in the time of king Edward the sixt discovered the Moscovian passage farther North then Thyle was therefore put to death. The rude Indian Canoa halleth those seas, the Portingals, the Saracenes, and Moores travaile continually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our Navie)
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine other reasons, or arguments to proove a passage by the Northwest, learnedly written by M. Richard Willes Gentleman. (search)
t Ocean beyond America , usually called Mar del Zur, knowen to be open at 40. degrees elevation from the Island Japan, yea three hundred leagues Northerly above Japan : yet may there be land to hinder the thorow passage that way by Sea, as in the examples aforesaid it falleth out, Asia and America there being joyned together ine elevation of 63. degrees: he knewe no Ocean sea beyond Asia, yet have the Portugals trended the cape of Good hope at the South point of Afrike, and travelled to Japan an Island in the East Ocean, betweene Asia & America : our merchants in the time of king Edward the sixt discovered the Moscovian passage farther North then Thyle was therefore put to death. The rude Indian Canoa halleth those seas, the Portingals, the Saracenes, and Moores travaile continually up and downe that reach from Japan to China , from China to Malacca, from Malacca to the Moluccaes: and shall an Englishman, better appointed then any of them all (that I say no more of our Navie)
Bengala, and so passed the notable and famous river of Ganges, where hee hath his fall into the maine Ocean, under the tropike of Cancer, and to the Cape of Malaca, and unto the great and large Islands of Sumatra, Java major, Java minor, Mindanao, Palobane, Celebes , Gilolo, Tidore, Mathin, Borneo , Machian, Terenate, and all other the Islands of Molucques and Spiceries, and so East alongst the coasts of Cathaia, to the portes of China , Zaiton and Quinsay, and to the Island of Zipango and Japan , situate in the East, in 37. degrees of Septentrionall latitude and in 195. of longitude. These are their noble and worthie discoveries. Here also is not to bee forgotten, that in the yere of our Lord, 1501. that famous and worthy gentleman Americus Vespucius did discover, people, and plant to their use the holdes and forts which they have in Brasill, of whom (he being but a private gentleman) the whole countrey or firme land of the West Indies, is commonly called and knowen by the name of
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...