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Homer, Odyssey 174 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 166 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs) 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
non at Mycenae, and begged him to muster an army against Troy and to raise levies in Greece. And he, sending a herald to each of the kings, reminded them of the oaths which they had sworn,As to these oaths, see above, Apollod. 3.10.9. and warned them to look to the safety each of his own wife, saying that the affront had been offered equally to the whole of Greece. And while many were eager to join in the expedition, some repaired also to Ulysses in Ithaca. But he, not wishing to go to the war, feigned madness. However, Palamedes, son of Nauplius, proved his madness to be fictitious; and when Ulysses pretended to rave, Palamedes followed him, and snatching Telemachus from Penelope's bosom, drew his sword as if he would kill him. And in his fear for the child Ulysses confessed that his madness was pretended, and he went to the war.As to the madness which Ulysses feigned in order to escape going
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ysses had a prosperous voyage; and when he was near Ithaca and already saw the smoke rising from the town,Homeame, twenty from Zacynthus, and twelve from Ithaca. See Hom. Od. 16.245-253. Apollodorus gives, Ormenus, Polybus and Andromedes. And from Ithaca itself the suitors were twelve, to wit:— Antinous, s, and Agamedes, and Augeas. Then he sailed home to Ithaca and offered the sacrifices prescribed by Tito the kingdom, and Ulysses himself went to Ithaca. Meanwhile Telegonus, sailing in search of his father, landed in Ithaca and ravaged the island; and marching out to repel him Ulysses was killed handed over the kingdom to his son and repaired to Ithaca, and there he found Poliporthes, whom Penelope had in search of him. And having come to the island of Ithaca, he drove away some of the cattle, and when e obliged Ulysses to withdraw not only from Ithaca, but also from Cephallenia and Zacynthus; and he re
Aristophanes, Wasps (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 183 (search)
Bdelycleon Who, who? Let's see. Why it's he! What does this mean? Who are you? Come, speak! Philocleon I am Noman. Bdelycleon Noman? Of what country? Philocleon Of Ithaca, son of Apodrasippides. Bdelycleon Ha! Mister Noman, you will not laugh presently. Pull him out quick. Ah! the wretch, where has he crept to? Does he not resemble a she-ass to the life? Philocleon If you do not leave me in peace, I shall sue. Bdelycleon And what will the suit be about? Philocleon The shade of an ass. Bdelycleon You are a poor man of very little wit, but thoroughly brazen. Philocleon A poor man! Ah! by Zeus! you know not now what I am worth; but you will know when you disembowel the old Heliast's money-bag. Bdelycleon Come, get back indoors, both you and your ass. Philocleon Oh! my brethren of the tribunal! oh! Cleon! to the rescue! Bdelycleon Go and bawl in there under lock and key. And you there, pile plenty of stones against the door, thrust the bolt home into the staple, and to kee
Aristotle, Poetics, section 1460a (search)
died—and not in the play; for example, in the Electra the news of the Pythian games,In Sophocles'Electrathe plot hinges on a false story of Orestes' death by an accident at the Pythian games. Presumably the anachronism shocked Aristotle. or in the Mysians the man who came from Tegea to Mysia without speaking.Telephus. To say that the plot would otherwise have been ruined is ridiculous. One should not in the first instance construct such a plot, and if a poet does write thus, and there seems to be a more reasonable way of treating the incident, then it is positively absurd. Even in the Odyssey the inexplicable elements in the story of his landingHom. Od. 13.116ff. It seemed to the critics inexplicable that Odysseus should not awake when his ship ran aground at the harbour of Phorcys in Ithaca and the Phaeacian sailors carried him ashore. would obviously have been intolerable, had they been written by an inferior poet
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs), line 82 (search)
where they have come from to Sicilian Aetna's crag. Enter by Eisodos B Odysseus with his men. Odysseus Strangers, could you tell me where we might find a stream of water to cure our thirst, and whether anyone is willing to sell provisions to needy sailors? Why, what is this? We seem to have marched into Dionysus' town. For here's a throng of satyrs near the cave. My first words to the eldest: Greeting! Silenus Greeting, stranger! But tell me your name and country. Odysseus Odysseus, of Ithaca, lord of Cephallene. Silenus I know of the man, the wheedling chatterer, Sisyphus' son.One version of Odysseus' ancestry, alluded to several times in tragedy, makes Anticleia, Odysseus' mother, marry Laertes when she is already pregnant by Sisyphus. Odysseus The very same. But spare me these aspersions. Silenus From what land have you sailed here to Sicily? Odysseus From Ilium and from the fighting at Troy. Silenus What? Did you not know your way home? Odysseus I was driven here by wi
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs), line 273 (search)
Cyclops to the Chorus-Leader You lie. For my part, I put more trust in this man than in RhadamanthysLegendary ruler of Crete and judge in the Underworld, famous for his justice. and think him more honest. But I wish to ask a question. Where have you sailed from? What is your country? What city was it that brought you up? Odysseus We are men of Ithaca by birth, and it is from Ilium, after sacking the city, that we have come to your land, Cyclops, blown off-course by sea-storms. Cyclops Are you the ones who went to punish Ilium on the Scamander for the theft of the worthless Helen? Odysseus Yes, we are the ones who endured that terrible toil. Cyclops Disgraceful expedition, to sail for the sake of one woman to the land of the Phrygians! Odysseus It was the doing of a god: blame no mortal for it. But, o noble son of the sea-god, we at once entreat you and give you our frank censure: do not have the hardness to kill benefactors who have come to your house and to make of them a go
Homer, Odyssey, Book 1, line 1 (search)
ese things, goddess, daughter of Zeus, beginning where thou wilt, tell thou even unto us. Now all the rest, as many as had escaped sheer destruction, were at home, safe from both war and sea, but Odysseus alone, filled with longing for his return and for his wife, did the queenly nymph Calypso, that bright goddess,keep back in her hollow caves, yearning that he should be her husband. But when, as the seasons revolved, the year came in which the gods had ordained that he should return home to Ithaca, not even there was he free from toils, even among his own folk. And all the gods pitied himsave Poseidon; but he continued to rage unceasingly against godlike Odysseus until at length he reached his own land. Howbeit Poseidon had gone among the far-off Ethiopians—the Ethiopians who dwell sundered in twain, the farthermost of men, some where Hyperion sets and some where he rises,there to receive a hecatomb of bulls and rams, and there he was taking his joy, sitting at the feast; but the othe
Homer, Odyssey, Book 1, line 44 (search)
uch deeds. But my heart is torn for wise Odysseus, hapless man, who far from his friends has long been suffering woesin a sea-girt isle, where is the navel of the sea. 'Tis a wooded isle, and therein dwells a goddess, daughter of Atlas of baneful mind, who knows the depths of every sea, and himself holds the tall pillars which keep earth and heaven apart.His daughter it is that keeps back that wretched, sorrowing man; and ever with soft and wheedling words she beguiles him that he may forget Ithaca. But Odysseus, in his longing to see were it but the smoke leaping up from his own land, yearns to die. Yet thyheart doth not regard it, Olympian. Did not Odysseus beside the ships of the Argives offer thee sacrifice without stint in the broad land of Troy? Wherefore then didst thou conceive such wrath2 against him, O Zeus?” Then Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, answered her and said: “My child, what a word has escaped the barrier of thy teeth?How should I, then, forget godlike Odysseus, who is bey
Homer, Odyssey, Book 1, line 80 (search)
forth Hermes, the messenger, Argeiphontes,to the isle Ogygia, that with all speed he may declare to the fair-tressed nymph our fixed resolve, even the return of Odysseus of the steadfast heart, that he may come home. But, as for me, I will go to Ithaca, that I may the more arouse his son, and set courage in his heartto call to an assembly the long-haired Achaeans, and speak out his word to all the wooers, who are ever slaying his thronging sheep and his sleek2 kine of shambling gait. And I willsharp bronze,heavy and huge and strong, wherewith she vanquishes the ranks of men—of warriors, with whom she is wroth, she, the daughter of the mighty sire. Then she went darting down from the heights of Olympus, and took her stand in the land of Ithaca at the outer gate of Odysseus, on the threshold of the court. In her hand she held the spear of bronze,and she was in the likeness of a stranger, Mentes, the leader of the Taphians. There she found the proud wooers. They were taking their pleasur
Homer, Odyssey, Book 1, line 125 (search)
e and song,full easily, seeing that without atonement they devour the livelihood of another, of a man whose white bones, it may be, rot in the rain as they lie upon the mainland, or the wave rolls them in the sea. Were they to see him returned to Ithaca, they would all pray to be swifter of foot,rather than richer in gold and in raiment. But now he has thus perished by an evil doom, nor for us is there any comfort, no, not though any one of men upon the earth should say that he will come; gone is the day of his returning. But come, tell me this, and declare it truly.Who art thou among men, and from whence? Where is thy city and where thy parents? On what manner of ship didst thou come, and how did sailors bring thee to Ithaca? Who did they declare themselves to be? For nowise, methinks, didst thou come hither on foot. And tell me this also truly, that I may know full well,whether this is thy first coming hither, or whether thou art indeed a friend of my father's house. For many were th
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