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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
r the blowing up of the enemy's magazines. Nevertheless at daybreak, on finding the enemy gone from his lines at Jonesborough, I ordered a general pursuit south, General Thomas following to the left of the railroad, General Howard on its right, and General Schofield keeping off about two miles to the east. We overtook the enemy again near Lovejoy's Station in a strong intrenched position. with his flanks well protected behind a branch of Walnut Creek to the right and a confluent of the Flint River to his left. We pushed close up and reconnoitered the ground and found he had evidently halted to cover his communication with the McDonough and Fayetteville road. Rumors began to arrive, through prisoners captured, that Atlanta had been abandoned during the night of September 1; that Hood had blown up his ammunition trains, which accounted for the sounds so plainly heard by us, and which were yet unexplained; that Stewart's corps was then retreating toward McDonough, and that the milit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
g with the Fourth Division and extending southward to this place. Colonel Minty, commanding the Second Division, was directed to extend his troops along the line of the Ocmulgee and Altamaha rivers as far as Jacksonville. General McCook, with about five hundred men of his division, was sent to Tallahassee, Florida, with orders to receive the surrender of the rebels in that State and to watch the country to the north and eastward. In addition to this, troops from the First and Second divisions were directed to watch the Flint River crossings, and small parties were stationed at the principal railroad stations from Atlanta to Eufala, as well as at Columbus and West Point and Talladega. By these means I confidently expected to arrest all large parties of fugitives and soldiers, and by a thorough system of scouts hoped to obtain timely information of the movements of important personages. For an account of the movements of Jefferson Davis and his cabinet, see notes pp. 763 and 766.
ere moving, which made it necessary for the line of march to be changed to a neighborhood road. In consequence of this delay my corps did not arrive at Jonesboroa till near 10 a. m. on the 31st, but it reached there immediately in rear of General Hardee's last division. The last three brigades of my corps, in consequence of the distance they had marched, and having been on picket, arrived about 1.30 p. m. The enemy had during the previous evening and night, effected a crossing of the Flint river, and made a lodgement on the east bank. The preliminaries for the attack were arranged. My corps was formed almost parallel to the railroad, immediately to the right of Jonesboroa, connecting with Hardee's right, his line extending towards Flint river, and making almost a right angle with the railroad. It was found that Hardee's Corps did not cover as much ground as was expected, and I was instructed to extend my troops so as to fill up the interval; and my command was moved almost two
M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Fort Donelson, Tenn. 55 Wyatt, Miss. 1 Shiloh, Tenn. 103 Snake Creek Gap, Ga. 1 Corinth, Miss. 29 Resaca, Ga. 4 Lundy's Lane, Ala. 1 Dallas, Ga. 1 Meed Creek, Miss. 3 Rome, Ga. 1 Jackson, Tenn. 1 Nancy's Creek, Ga. 1 Grenada, Miss. 1 Atlanta, Ga. 2 Bear Creek, Tenn. 1 Milledgeville, Ga. 3 Salem, Miss. 5 Orangeburg, S. C. 1 Montezuma, Tenn. 1 Place unknown 1 Present, also, at Saratoga, Tenn.; Cherokee; Florence; Athens; Moulton; Flint River. notes.--The Ninth lost the most men, killed in action, of any Illinois regiment. After serving in the three months service, the regiment enlisted for three years, leaving Cairo September 5, 1861. It proceeded to Paducah, Ky., where it was stationed until February, 1862, when it moved with Grant's Army to Fort Donelson. It was then in McArthur's Brigade of C. F. Smith's Division; its loss at Fort Donelson was 36 killed, 165 wounded, and 9 missing, total, 210. At Shiloh, the Ninth s
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Alabama, 1864 (search)
ntry (Detachments). PENNSYLVANIA--Indpt, Battery "E," Light Arty. (Section); 28th and 147th Infantry (Detachments). April 13: Skirmish near DecaturILLINOIS--9th Mounted Infantry. Union loss, 2 killed, 41 missing. Total, 43. April 17: Affair, Flint RiverILLINOIS--9th Mounted Infantry (Detachment). April 17: Skirmish, DecaturILLINOIS--9th Mounted Infantry (Detachment). April 18: Skirmish, DecaturALABAMA--1st Cavalry. April 19: Operations in Morgan County(Confederate Reports.) April 21: Affakirmish, PollardNEW YORK--14th Cavalry (Co. "M"). July 25: Skirmish, CourtlandMICHIGAN--18th Infantry. NEW YORK--17th Veteran Infantry. OHIO--9th Cavalry. WISCONSIN--32d Infantry. Union loss, 2 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 6. July 25: Skirmish, Flint RiverINDIANA--12th Cavalry. July 25-28: Exp. from Decatur to Courtland and MoultonINDIANA--25th Infantry. MICHIGAN--18th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "F," 1st Light Arty. (Section). TENNESSEE--3d Cavalry (Battalion). WISCONSIN--32d Infantry. Union loss,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
1865. 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, Dept. of the Gulf, to May, 1865. Dept. of Mississippi to November, 1865. Service. Duty at Nashville, Tenn., till May 29, 1864. Moved to Huntsville, Ala., May 29, and duty there and guarding Railroad from Decatur to Paint Rock, Ala. Headquarters at Huntsville and Brownsborough till September 15. Action at Big Cove Valley June 27. Near Vienna July 8. Scout in Clear Springs and Sink Springs Valleys July 18-21 (Detachment). Flint River, Ala., July 25. Paint Rock Station July 30. Moore's Hill August 11. Operations in Madison County August 12-14. Near Lynchburg September 29 (Detachment). Repulse of Buford's attack on Huntsville September 30-October 1 and October 18 (Cos. C, D and H ). Regiment moved to Tullahoma, Tenn., September 15, and duty there till November 26. Siege of Decatur, Ala., October 26-29 (Detachment). Near Maysville, Ala., and near New Market, Ala., November 17 (Detachment). Moved
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
reached. Hazardous it might be, but there was a smack of daring and dash about it, which was captivating, and gave to officers and men an inspiriting feeling different from that of an ordinary march. Entire confidence too was felt in the gallant leader of the command, and the able and farseeing General who had intrusted him with it. Starting out in a southeasterly direction, the expedition took the road toward Somerville, a county seat, fifteen miles from Decatur. The road crosses Flint river seven miles out, and passes over a country generally of flat surface. Somerville was reached about nine o'clock at night, and the command bivouacked until morning. A forage train accompanied it this far with corn for the horses — the wagons returning to Decatur next day. Henceforward the horses were to take the chances of such forage as the country afforded along the route. July 11th.--The expedition was now fairly started in the enemy's country, and, judging from the rations issued,
r the blowing up of the enemy's magazines. Nevertheless, at daybreak, on finding the enemy gone from his lines at Jonesboroa,I ordered a general pursuit south, General Thomas following to the left of the railroad, General Howard on its right, and General Schofield keeping off about two miles to the east. We overtook the enemy again near Lovejoy's station, in a strong, intrenched position, with his flanks well protected behind a branch of Walnut creek to the right, and a confluent of the Flint river to his left. We pushed close up and reconnoitered the ground, and found he had evidently halted to cover his communication with the McDonough and Fayetteville roads. Rumors began to arrive through prisoners captured that Atlanta had been abandoned during the night of September first; that Hood had blown up his ammunition-trains, which accounted for the sounds so plainly heard by us, and which were yet unexplained; that Stewart's corps was then retreating toward McDonough, and that the
y to the north and eastward.In addition to this, troops from the First and Second divisions were directed to watch the Flint river crossings, and small parties were stationed at the principal railroad stations from Atlanta to Eufaula, as well as at rolton, Georgia; twenty-sixth, marched to and crossed the Chattahoochee; twenty-seventh, via Newman to Flat Shoals, on Flint river; twenty-eighth and twenty-ninth, via Barnesville and Forsyth to Macon. Georgia. During this march he skirmished with following as a report of the doings of the troops under my command, which resulted in the capture of the bridges over Flint river, on the eighteenth instant. In obedience to orders received from Colonel Minty, commanding division, I moved from cnight, and to reach ( practicable) at daylight on the eighteenth, and capture what is known as the double bridges over Flint river, and to spare nothing necessary for the accomplishment of the object. The command was put in light marching trim, a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
t he had taken all necessary precautions. General Adams at Opelika, Ala., was warned of danger; General Hardee, at East Point, was instructed to act on his own discretion, and Generals Lee and Armstrong were both asked to find out where the enemy was. Yet during this day (29th) the armies of Schofield and Thomas took their designated positions on the line selected by Sherman, and Howard going still further, drove away the plucky Confederate cavalry and artillery at Shoal creek, saved the Flint river bridge, and on the night of August 30th took and began intrenching a position a half mile from Jonesboro. On the same night Hood called his corps commanders in consultation, and finally determined to send Hardee's and Lee's corps, under Hardee, that night to Jonesboro to drive the Federals across Flint river. This, I hoped, Hood says in his report of February, 1865. would draw the attention of the enemy in that direction, and that he would abandon his works on the left, so that I could a
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