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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 68 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 2 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 11 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
d at Smithfield. The Good people of W. received us very kindly and enthusiastically. July 4th Declaration of Independence Day, but as we had other business before us, we did not celebrate the day in the old time style. We marched through Halltown and Charlestown, near the old field where that fanatical murderer and abolitionist, John Brown, was hung, and halted under a heavy cannonading at Bolivar Heights, near Harper's Ferry. This place on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and on the Po from Maryland Heights fired pretty close to us repeatedly, and bullets fell so rapidly it was dangerous to walk over the town. But as we were on a frolic, resolved to see everything, we heeded the danger very little. We returned to camp, near Halltown. I was sick and restless during the night. July 6th As I was weak from my sickness of the past night, I rode in an ambulance all day. Rhodes' and Ramseur's divisions crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown, and marched through the famous tow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Jackson at Harper's Ferry in 1861. (search)
m Harper's Ferry. In a short time a train returned for my battery. The farmers got their horses and went home rejoicing, and we set out for our destination. The infantry moved out of Charlestown about midnight. We kept to our train as far as Halltown, only four miles from the ferry. There we set down our guns to be run forward by hand to Bolivar Heights, west of the town, from which we could shell the place if necessary. John Brown. The well-known raid of John Brown upon Harper's Fersion of the armory. As I was acting entirely on my own judgment and responsibility, it was apparent I must not act prematurely, before the danger was self-evident and imminent. As the evening advanced, nearer and nearer came the troops from Halltown, and finally, shortly after 9 o'clock, when they had advanced to within less than a mile of the armory,--in time less than five minutes,--the torch was applied, and before I could withdraw my men from the village, the two arsenal buildings, cont
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
ows: The Federals were in possession of Front Royal, which is but twelve miles from Strasburg, while Winchester is eighteen. Fremont was at Wardensville, distant twenty miles from Strasburg, and had telegraphed President Lincoln that he would enter the latter place by five P. M. the next day. The mass of Jackson's forces had marched twenty-five miles to reach Winchester, and his rear guard, under Winder (after skirmishing with the enemy at Harper's Ferry for part of the day), had camped at Halltown, which is over forty miles distant from Strasburg. The next day (Saturday, May 31st) witnessed a race for Strasburg, which was in Jackson's direct line of retreat, but it was very different in character from the race of the preceding Saturday. Orders were issued for everything in the Confederate camp to move early in the morning. The two thousand three hundred Federal prisoners were first sent forward, guarded by the Twenty-first Virginia Regiment; next the long trains, including many c
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 15: movement into Maryland. (search)
sed through the town in the direction of Harper's Ferry and Ewell's division bivouacked on the banks of the Opequon. On the morning of the 13th we resumed the march, and reached the turnpike from Charlestown to Harper's Ferry, one mile above Halltown, and bivouacked in sight of the enemy's work on Bolivar Heights, covering the town at the ferry, to wait until McLaws and Walker should get in position on Maryland Heights and Loudon Heights respectively, both of which overlooked and commanded tah, Ewell's division along the turnpike, and one brigade of Jackson's division along the Potomac on the left, the rest of the division moving in support. Ewell's division moved along and on each side of the pike in three columns until it passed Halltown, when it was formed in treble line of battle with Trimble's and Hays' brigades on the front line, and Lawton's and my brigade in their rear, Lawton's forming the second line, and mine the third. In this order we moved forward through some field
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
ortifying at once. Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions were advanced to the front, and very heavy skirmishing ensued and was continued until night, but I waited for General Anderson to arrive before making a general attack. He encountered Wilson's division of cavalry at Summit Point, and, after driving it off, went into camp at that place. At light next morning, it was discovered that the enemy had retired during the night, and his rear guard of cavalry was driven through Charlestown towards Halltown, where Sheridan had taken a strong position under the protection of the heavy guns on Maryland Heights. I demonstrated on the enemy's front on the 22nd, 23rd and 24th, and there was some skirmishing. General Anderson then consented to take my position in front of Charlestown and amuse the enemy with Kershaw's division of infantry, supported by McCausland's brigade of cavalry on the left and a regiment of Fitz. Lee's cavalry on the right, while I moved with my infantry and artillery to
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
neral, 124, 127, 170, 173 Griffin, Colonel, 207 Grigsby, Colonel, 142-44, 146-47, 149, 403, 404, Groveton, 119, 120, 122, 133 Guardstown, 284 Guest's House, 223-25, 228-29, 230, 232 Guiney's Depot, 166, 185, 197 Gunpowder River, 386, 394 Hagerstown, 139, 142, 144, 145, 281-82, 285, 395, 402 Hagerstown Pike, 140, 145, 149, 254 Hairston, Colonel P., 3, 5, 7, 16, 72 Hale, Major S., 99, 110, 145, 187, 203, 313, 359 Halleck, General (U. S. A.), 104, 105, 132, 477 Halltown, 136, 408 Hambrick, Major, 6 Hamilton's Crossing, 166, 168-170, 191-92, 194, 199 203 Hampshire County, 332, 404, 455 Hampton, General, 32, 341, 352-53, 355, 379 Hampton, Pa., 258 Hampton's Legion, 15, 28, 47 Hancock, General (U. S. A.), 72, 352 Hanging Rock, 378 Hanover County, 167, 361 Hanover Junction, 258, 261, 264, 345, 348, 354, 357, 359, 360, 370 Hanover Town, 361 Hardwick, Captain W. W., 184 Hardy County, 332-34, 404, 454-55, 457, 460 Harman, Colonel, W
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Raid on the Virginia Central Railroad-raid on the Weldon Railroad-Early's movement upon Washington-mining the works before Petersburg-explosion of the mine before Petersburg- campaign in the Shenandoah Valley-capture of the Weldon Railroad (search)
re and Ohio Railroad, which he had taken the precaution to bring back and collect at that point. I asked the general where the enemy was. He replied that he did not know. He said the fact was, that he was so embarrassed with orders from Washington moving him first to the right and then to the left that he had lost all trace of the enemy. I then told the general that I would find out where the enemy was, and at once ordered steam got up and trains made up, giving directions to push for Halltown, some four miles above Harpers Ferry, in the Shenandoah Valley. The cavalry and the wagon trains were to march, but all the troops that could be transported by the cars were to go in that way. I knew that the valley was of such importance to the enemy that, no matter how much he was scattered at that time, he would in a very short time be found in front of our troops moving south. I then wrote out General Hunter's instructions. I told him that Sheridan was in Washington, and still ano
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
t be expected, and we are determined to stop them at all hazards. Bear in mind the object is to drive the enemy south, and to do this you want to keep him always in sight. Be guided in your course by the course he takes. Make your own arrangements for supplies of all kinds, giving regular vouchers for such as will be taken from loyal citizens in the country through which you march. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. The troops were immediately put in motion, and the advance reached Halltown that night. General Hunter having, in our conversation, expressed a willingness to be relieved from command, I telegraphed to have General Sheridan, then at Washington, sent to Harper's Ferry by the morning train, with orders to take general command of all the troops in the field, and to call on General Hunter, at Monocacy, who would turn over to him my letter of instructions. I remained at Monocacy until General Sheridan arrived, on the morning of the 6th, and after a conference with
but before General Grant's instructions were written out, Hunter had conformed to them by directing the concentration at Halltown, about four miles in front of Harper's Ferry, of all his force available for field service. Therefore the different bod's cavalry, which had followed McCausland toward Moorefield after the burning of Chambersburg, were all in motion toward Halltown on August 6. Affairs at Monocacy kept me but an hour or two, and these disposed of, I continued on to Harper's Ferryn at the time, sending occasional raiding parties into Maryland as far as Hagerstown. The concentration of my troops at Halltown being an indication to Early that we intended to renew the offensive, however, he immediately began counter preparations that he was accurately informed of all my movements. To anticipate them, therefore, he began his retreat up the valley the day that I moved out from Halltown, and consequently was able to place himself south of Winchester before I could get there.
ey reason for the destruction withdrawal to Halltown alarm in the North over the retrograde movemld see hut one such position, and that was at Halltown, in front of Harper's Ferry. Subsequent expering the matter, I determined to move back to Halltown, carrying out, as I retired, my instructions . 26-2:30 P. M.-1864. Major-General Sheridan, Halltown, Va.: Telegraphed you that I had good reasfensive; so, after the army had moved back to Halltown the preceding night, without loss or inconventry. My retrograde move from Strasburg to Halltown caused considerable alarm in the North, as thrlestown and pushed well up to my position at Halltown. Here for the next three days they skirmishhe occasion arise, and deeming my position at Halltown the most advantageous in which to await devedrew Anderson and McCausland from my front at Halltown to Stephenson's depot. By the 27th all ofplated it; and I marched my infantry out from Halltown to the front of Charlestown, with the intenti
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