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Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 44 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 42 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 32 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 14 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 12 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 10 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Judea (Israel) or search for Judea (Israel) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The booke made by the right worshipful M. Robert Thorne in the yeere 1527. in Sivil, to Doctour Ley, Lord ambassadour for king Henry the eight, to Charles the Emperour, being an information of the parts of the world, discovered by him and the king of Portingal: and also of the way to the Moluccaes by the North. (search)
then the streits of Constantinople, and then the sea called Euxinus, which is within the sayd streights: and comming out of the sayd streights, followeth Turcia major (though now on both sides it is called Turcia.) And so the coast runneth Southward to Syria , and over against the sayd Turcia are the Islands of Rhodes, Candie, and Cyprus . And over against Italie are the Islands of Sicilia and Sardinia . And over against Spaine is Majorca and Minorca . In the ende of the gulfe of Syria is Judea . And from thence returneth the coast toward the Occident, till it commeth to the streights where we began, which all is the coast of Affrike and Barbarie. Also your Lordship shall understand that the coastes of the Sea throughout all the world, I have coloured with yellow, for that it may appeare that all that is within the line coloured yellow, is to be imagined to be maine land or Islands: and all without the line so coloured to bee Sea: whereby it is easie and light to know it. Albeit in
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage or journey, made by Master Laurence Aldersey, Marchant of London, to the Cities of Jerusa lem, and Tripolis, &c. In the yeere 1581. Penned and set downe by himselfe. (search)
pell with two altars, whereupon they say masse: the place is built with gray marble, and hath bene beautifull, but now it is partly decayed. Neere thereto is the sepulchre of the innocents slaine by Herod, the sepulchres of Paul, of Jerome, and of Eusebius. Also a litle from this monasterie is a place under the ground, where the virgine Mary abode with Christ when Herod sought him to destroy him. We stayed at Bethlem that night, and the next day we went from thence to the mountaines of Judea , which are about eight miles from Jerusalem, where are the ruines of an olde monasterie. In the mid way from the monasterie to Jerusalem is the place where John Baptist was borne, being now an olde monasterie, and cattell kept in it. Also a mile from Jerusalem is a place called Inventio sanctae crucis, where the wood was found that made the crosse. In the citie of Jerusalem we saw the hall where Pilate sate in judgement when Christ was condemned, the staires whereof are at Rome, as they
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
h walles contayning five miles in circuit, and but of small strength. For the governement of this place is a Sanjaco with all his housholde and no other companie. This citie is very large, delightfull, and pleasant, abounding with gardens and faire fountaines. Other fortie miles further is Latma, a castle of very small importance, and kept as other with fortie Turkes under an Aga. In this place is no port, but a roade very daungerous, and without other habitation. Passing this place we enter Judea . But because our intent is to reason simply of the voyage to Mecca , we will proceede no further this way, but returning to our first way, let it suffice to say, that from Alexandria to Cairo are two hundred miles, in which way I finde nothing woorthie of memorie. Of the mightie Citie of Cairo. CAIRO containeth in circuit eighteene miles, being so inhabited and replenished with people, that almost it cannot receive more; and therefore they have begunne to builde newe houses without th
ne. Distant from Brulles five and thirtie miles there is another castle like unto the abovesayd kept by an Aga with fourtie men or thereabout. More within the lande by the rivers side is Damiata an auncient citie environed with walles contayning five miles in circuit, and but of small strength. For the governement of this place is a Sanjaco with all his housholde and no other companie. This citie is very large, delightfull, and pleasant, abounding with gardens and faire fountaines. Other fortie miles further is Latma, a castle of very small importance, and kept as other with fortie Turkes under an Aga. In this place is no port, but a roade very daungerous, and without other habitation. Passing this place we enter Judea . But because our intent is to reason simply of the voyage to Mecca , we will proceede no further this way, but returning to our first way, let it suffice to say, that from Alexandria to Cairo are two hundred miles, in which way I finde nothing woorthie of memorie.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of a Voiage to Constantinople and Syria , begun the 21. of March 1593. and ended the 9. of August, 1595. wherein is shewed the order of delivering the second Present by Master Edward Barton her majesties Ambassador, which was sent from her Majestie to Sultan Murad Can, Emperour of Turkie. (search)
is not one of the noble race knowen alive in the Iland, onely two or three remaine in Venice but of litle wealth, which in the time of the warres escaped. After we had stayed in this Iland some thirty dayes, we set saile in the foresayd shippe being about the burthen of 900 tunnes, having in her passengers of divers nations, as Tartars, Persians, Jewes, and sundry Christians. Amongst all which I had often conference with a Jew, who by reason of his many yeeres education at Safet a place in Judea neere Jerusalem, where they study the Rabbines with some other arts as they thinke good, as also for his travels into Persia and Ormus, he seemed to be of good experience in matters abroad, who related unto me such conference as he had with a Baniane at Ormus, being one of the Indians inhabiting the countrey of Cambaia. This Baniane being a Gentile had skill in Astronomie, as many of that nation have, who by his books written in his owne tongue and Characters, could tell the time of Eclipses