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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 38 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 18 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Ephesus (Turkey) or search for Ephesus (Turkey) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE SUBJECT (search)
sium, a Courtesan of Athens, who returns his affection. Being sent on public business to Naupactus, a certain Captain of Ephesus, Pyrgopolinices by name, comes to Athens, and insinuates himself into the good graces of her mother, in order that he maet Philocomasium into his power. Having deceived the mother, he places the daughter on board ship and carries her off to Ephesus. On this, Palaestrio, a faithful servant of Pleusicles, hastens to embark for Naupactus, with the view of telling his macarefully conceals from the Captain who he himself is. He then privately writes to Pleusicles, requesting him to come to Ephesus. On arriving, Pleusicles is hospitably entertained by Periplecomenus, a friend of his father, an old gentleman who lives not actually seen it himself. Palaestrio, therefore, persuades him that the twin-sister of Philocomasium has arrived at Ephesus, and with her lover is staying at their neighbour's house. To forward their designs, Palaestrio then invents another pla
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian, the Grammarian.] (search)
THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian, the Grammarian.] A Captain carries off to Ephesus a Courtesan (Meretricem) from Athens. While his servant is intending to tell this (Id) to his master, her lover, who is an Ambassador (Legato) abroad, he himself is captured at sea, and (Et) is given as a present to the same Captain. The servant sends for his (Suum) master from Athens, and cleverly makes a hole in the party wall, common to the two (Geminis) houses, that it may be possible (Liceret) for the two lovers secretly to meet. Wandering about (Oberrans), her keeper sees them from the tiles, but he is played a trick (Ridiculis) upon, as though it were another person. Palaestrio, too, as well (Item) persuades the Captain to have his mistress dismissed (Omissam), since the wife of the old man (Senis), his neighbour, wishes to marry him. He begs that she will go away of her own accord (Ultro), and gives her many things. He, himself, caught in the house of the old m
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 1 (search)
And pray, did they really say so? ARTOTROGUS They both entreated me to bring you past to-day by way of a sightBy way of a sight: "Pompam." Strictly speaking, this word means the escort of a procession, whence it came to signify the procession itself. to them. PYRGOPOLINICES 'Tis really a very great plague to be too handsome a man. ARTOTROGUS They are quite a nuisance to me; they are praying, entreating, beseeching me, to let them see you; bidding me be fetched to them; so that I can't give my attention to your business. PYRGOPOLINICES It seems that it is time for us to go to the Forum, that I may count out their pay to those soldiers whom I have enlisted of late. For King SeleucusSeleucus: The King of that part of Asia Minor where Ephesus was situated. entreated me with most earnest suit that I would raise and enlist recruits for him. To that business have I resolved to devote my attention this day. ARTOTROGUS Come, let's be going then. PYRGOPOLINICES Guards, follow me. (Exeunt.)
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 1 (search)
oaster," he says, was the Greek name of the play. It is not known who was the Greek author from whom Plautus took this play, which is one of his best., in Greek, of this Comedy; the same we call in Latin. "the Braggart" (Gloriosus). This city is Ephesus; then, the Captain, my master, who has gone off hence to the Forum, a bragging, impudent, stinking fellow, brimful of lying and lasciviousness, says that all the women are following him of their own accord. Wherever he goes, he is the laughing.s as ever an opportunity was presented for this Captain, he tricked this procuress, the mother of the damsel, whom my master loved. For, unknown to her mother, he put the daughter on board ship, and carried this woman, against her will, hither to Ephesus. Soon as I knew that the lady of my master was carried off from Athens, as quickly as ever I was able, I procured for myself a ship: I embarked, that I might carry tidings of this matter to my master at Naupactum. When we had got out to sea, som
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 8 (search)
laced before windows to prevent serpents and other noxious reptiles from getting in.. To PHILOCOMASIUM. But, undoubtedly, I did see you in the house next door. PALAESTRIO Do you persist, you rascal, in pretending to accuse her? PHILOCOMASIUM In good sooth, then, the dream has not turned out untrue, that I dreamed last night. PALAESTRIO What did you dream? PHILOCOMASIUM I'll tell you; but, I pray you, give attention. Last night, in my sleep, my twin-sister seemed to have come from Athens to Ephesus with a certain person, her lover. Both of them seemed to me to be having their lodgings here next door. PALAESTRIO to the AUDIENCE. The dream that's being related is Palaestrio's--pray, go on. PHILOCOMASIUM I seemed to be delighted because my sister had come, and on her account I seemed to be incurring a most grievous suspicion. For, in my sleep, my own servant seemed to accuse me, as you are now doing, of being caressed by a strange young man, whereas it was that own twin-sister of mine, w
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 5 (search)
comasium appears as her twin-sister, who is supposed to have come the day before from Athens to Ephesus, and gives directions about returning thanks for having landed in safety. As the circumstance ovant SERVANT. Put fire on the altar, that in my joy I may return praises and thanks to Diana of Ephesus, and that I may send up for her a grateful smoke with odours of Arabia: she who has preserved mOCOMASIUM I? SCELEDRUS Yes, you. PHILOCOMASIUM I, who arrived from Athens yesterday evening at Ephesus, with my lover, a young man of Athens? SCELEDRUS Tell me, what business have you here in EphesuEphesus? PHILOCOMASIUM I had heard that my own twin-sister is here in Ephesus; I came here to look for her. SCELEDRUS You're a good-for-nothing woman. PHILOCOMASIUM Yes, i' faith, I am a very foolish one tEphesus; I came here to look for her. SCELEDRUS You're a good-for-nothing woman. PHILOCOMASIUM Yes, i' faith, I am a very foolish one to be parleying with you fellows. I am going. SCELEDRUS I won't let you go. Catches hold of her. PHILOCOMASIUM Let me go. SCELEDRUS You are discovered in the fact. I won't let you go. PHILOCOMASIUM B
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 1 (search)
there is any one there that is disagreable, I go off home; I cut the parley short. Stretched at my ease, I devote myself to pleasure, love, and mirth. In fine, at Ephesus was I born, not among the Apulians, not at AnimulaAt Animula: The people of Apulia, in the south of Italy, were noted for their clownish manners. Animula, as we st remarkable of all for their rusticity. Absurdities and anachronisms not unfrequently occur in our author. There is something absurd in a merry old gentleman of Ephesus going all the way to Animula for a simile.. PLEUSICLES O what a most delightful old man, if he possesses the qualities he mentions! Why, troth, surely now, he was his beauty, which captivated Helen.; and, therefore, he says that all the womenAll the women: The Parasite quizzes him upon this weak point in the First Act. in Ephesus of their own accord are courting him. PERIPLECOMENUS Aye, faith, many there are who could wishWho could wish: The meaning of Periplecomenus seems to be that the
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 4, scene 1 (search)
sires it. PALAESTRIO Doesn't she long for it? PYRGOPOLINICES What shall we do with that mistress of mine, who is at my house? PALAESTRIO Why, do you bid her to be gone about her business, wherever she chooses; as her twin-sister has come here to Ephesus, and her mother, and they are come to fetch her. PYRGOPOLINICES Ha! what's that you say? Has her mother come to Ephesus? PALAESTRIO Those say so who know it. PYRGOPOLINICES I' faith, a charming opportunity for me to turn the wench out of doors. Ephesus? PALAESTRIO Those say so who know it. PYRGOPOLINICES I' faith, a charming opportunity for me to turn the wench out of doors. PALAESTRIO Aye, but do you wish to do the thing handsomely? PYRGOPOLINICES Speak out, and give me your advice. PALAESTRIO Do you wish to pack her off forthwith, that she may quit you with a good grace? PYRGOPOLINICES I do so wish. PALAESTRIO Then this is the thing you must do. You have a superabundance of wealth; bid the woman to keep as a present for herself the gold and trinkets which you have supplied her with, and to take herself off from your house wherever she likes. PYRGOPOLINICES It ple