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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

and a letter from Chattanooga enables us to supply the particulars of the movements of the Yankees before the attack was made. The party was commanded by Gen. Carter, the Tennessee renegade, and numbered about 2,000 men. They penetrated into East Tennessee through a gap in the mountains near Kingston, and marched on London, a town of 1,500 inhabitants, on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bEast Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, 28 miles west of Knoxville, intending to burn the railroad bridge at that place; but, finding the bridge well surrounded by stockades and defended by artillery, they moved off to Lenoir, about seven miles nearer Knoxville, on the same road. Here they burnt the mammoth factory of the Lenoir Brothers, with all the out- buildings and the residence of the owners, and tore up the track for several miles. The 54th Virginia regiment, which had been stationed there, had just left that morning for Knoxville, and the place was therefore defenceless. They told two citizens, whom they captured there,
The Daily Dispatch: June 24, 1863., [Electronic resource], Capture of Yankee recruiting officers. (search)
Capture of Yankee recruiting officers. --Col. Roddy's command last week captured in Tennessee Col. Wm. P. Kendrick, of the 3d Tennessee (Yankee) regiment, and Capt. Daniel E Bonham, of the same regiment, both engaged in recruiting in Tennessee for the Federal. Several privates engaged in the same service were also captured. Col. Kendrick is a native of Tazewell county, Va., and the unworthy son of Rev. W. P. Kendrick, a Methodist minister, who has suffered in property and person for refTennessee for the Federal. Several privates engaged in the same service were also captured. Col. Kendrick is a native of Tazewell county, Va., and the unworthy son of Rev. W. P. Kendrick, a Methodist minister, who has suffered in property and person for refusing to take the oath to support Lincoln's Government. He has two brothers in the Confederate service, one of whom belonged to the command which captured the renegade. On the 15th of May last Wm F. Corbin and T. J. McGraw, two Confederate soldiers, members of the 4th Kentucky cavalry, were shot dead at Sandusky, Ohio, by order of Gen. Burnside, for recruiting for the Confederate service in Kentucky Comment upon what the fate of Kendrick and Bonham should be is unnecessary; but the following
Skirmishing in Tennessee military movements. Atlanta June 22. --A special dispatch to the Atlanta Intelligencer from Wartrace, Tenn, 21st instant, says: Gen. Wilder's "lighting division," composed of 2,000 Federal cavalry, 500 of whom are negroes, were driven back from Alexandria, Tenn, eight miles north west of Liberty, by Duke's cavalry, on the 17th. The enemy's loss was ten killed and a number wounded.--No loss on our side. Capt. Shelton, of Duke's 2d Kentucky regiment, has returned from Bardstown. He left on the 8th, and brought out a quantity of . has fallen back from Lebanon Murfreesboro'. Things