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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden). You can also browse the collection for Cythera (Greece) or search for Cythera (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 1, line 657 (search)
ishment detains; But I suspect the town where Juno reigns. For this 't is needful to prevent her art, And fire with love the proud Phoenician's heart: A love so violent, so strong, so sure, As neither age can change, nor art can cure. How this may be perform'd, now take my mind: Ascanius by his father is design'd To come, with presents laden, from the port, To gratify the queen, and gain the court. I mean to plunge the boy in pleasing sleep, And, ravish'd, in Idalian bow'rs to keep, Or high Cythera, that the sweet deceit May pass unseen, and none prevent the cheat. Take thou his form and shape. I beg the grace But only for a night's revolving space: Thyself a boy, assume a boy's dissembled face; That when, amidst the fervor of the feast, The Tyrian hugs and fonds thee on her breast, And with sweet kisses in her arms constrains, Thou may'st infuse thy venom in her veins.” The God of Love obeys, and sets aside His bow and quiver, and his plumy pride; He walks Iulus in his mother's sight
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 10, line 16 (search)
st grace. Since you can spare, from all your wide command, No spot of earth, no hospitable land, Which may my wand'ring fugitives receive; (Since haughty Juno will not give you leave;) Then, father, (if I still may use that name,) By ruin'd Troy, yet smoking from the flame, I beg you, let Ascanius, by my care, Be freed from danger, and dismiss'd the war: Inglorious let him live, without a crown. The father may be cast on coasts unknown, Struggling with fate; but let me save the son. Mine is Cythera, mine the Cyprian tow'rs: In those recesses, and those sacred bow'rs, Obscurely let him rest; his right resign To promis'd empire, and his Julian line. Then Carthage may th' Ausonian towns destroy, Nor fear the race of a rejected boy. What profits it my son to scape the fire, Arm'd with his gods, and loaded with his sire; To pass the perils of the seas and wind; Evade the Greeks, and leave the war behind; To reach th' Italian shores; if, after all, Our second Pergamus is doom'd to fall?
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 10, line 62 (search)
ride; Petition, while you public arms prepare; Pretend a peace, and yet provoke a war! 'T was giv'n to you, your darling son to shroud, To draw the dastard from the fighting crowd, And, for a man, obtend an empty cloud. From flaming fleets you turn'd the fire away, And chang'd the ships to daughters of the sea. But is my crime—the Queen of Heav'n offends, If she presume to save her suff'ring friends! Your son, not knowing what his foes decree, You say, is absent: absent let him be. Yours is Cythera, yours the Cyprian tow'rs, The soft recesses, and the sacred bow'rs. Why do you then these needless arms prepare, And thus provoke a people prone to war? Did I with fire the Trojan town deface, Or hinder from return your exil'd race? Was I the cause of mischief, or the man Whose lawless lust the fatal war began? Think on whose faith th' adult'rous youth relied; Who promis'd, who procur'd, the Spartan bride? When all th' united states of Greece combin'd, To purge the world of the perfidi