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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 773 9 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 445 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 83 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 50 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 48 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 45 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Marietta (Georgia, United States) or search for Marietta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
ation and Cassville. Skirmish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations on the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combats at Pine Hill, Lost Mountain, Brush Mountain, Gilgal Church, Noonday Creek, McAfee's Cross-Roads, Kenesaw Mountain, Powder Springs, Cheney's Farm, Kolb's Farm, Olley's Creek, Nickajack Creek, Noyes' Creek, and other points. June 24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
e Church, where three roads met from Acworth, Marietta, and Dallas. Here a hard battle was fought, tain the base, covering perfectly the town of Marietta, and :the railroad back to the Chattahoochee. General McPherson was ordered to move toward Marietta, his right on the railroad, General Thomas onnt, his right wing thrown back so as to cover Marietta, and his left behind Noyes' Creek, covering hhalf miles, it would reach the railroad below Marietta, cut off the enemy's right and center from itoward the Chattahoochee. In person I entered Marietta at 8.30 in the morning, just as the enemy's chich had not moved far, was ordered back into Marietta by the main road, and Generals McPherson and Smyrna Camp-Meeting Ground, five miles below Marietta. Here General Thomas found him, his front cod Rottenwood Creeks. Ordering a garrison for Marietta and General Logan to join his own army near tnt it in charge of his personal staff back to Marietta on its way to his Northern home. He was a no[4 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
n. No sooner was this movement developed than the enemy, on the night of the 2d and morning of the 3d of July, evacuated his position at Kenesaw and in front of Marietta, and we took position, the troops moving right on in pursuit. Contrary to expectation and information, we found that the enemy intended to make a stand upon a lry, and the inhabitants, always few in number and indisposed to give us information, had all gone farther south. 3Not an able-bodied man was to be found between Marietta and the enemy's line. We could only feel our way cautiously forward, using the greatest diligence in reconnaissances. The Army of the Tennessee, forming the let 5, the Chattahoochee river railroad bridge was completed, and our trains ran up to three-mile post. By General Sherman's direction, I sent Lieutenant Ernst to Marietta to superintend the construction of defenses at that place. An attack was ordered for 2 p. m., the object being as given above, but again no attack was made.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
f General Hooker. Baird's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, was left at Burnt Hickory to protect the trains at that point and the rear of the army. McCook's division of cavalry met the enemy's cavalry on the road leading from Burnt Hickory to Marietta near its intersection with the lower Dallas and Allatoona road. McCook's troops skirmished heavily with the force opposing them, inflicting on them considerable loss and capturing 52 prisoners, from whom it was ascertained that the whole of Wheeft of Schofield's command, with Johnson's division, of Palmer's corps, on the left of Wood; Stoneman's division of cavalry holding a hill to the left of Johnson, and then McCook's division of cavalry holding the road leading from Burnt Church to Marietta, via Golgotha, and guarding the left of the army. During the 28th there was considerable artillery firing, with skirmishing at intervals during the day and night. During the night of the 29th the enemy felt our line at several points, witho
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
vacuation of Kenesaw Mountain by the rebel forces and gave us possession of Marietta, Ga. On the occupation of that town the field hospital was transferred there somewhere about the 8th of July, 1864. It remained in Marietta until after we had crossed the Chattahoochee River, when it was brought forward to Vining's Station, Ga.,d furnished troops. The commissary supplies furnished until the occupation of Marietta consisted almost entirely of hard bread, salt pork or bacon, and fresh beef, we, soap, vinegar, or other small rations were issued. After the occupation of Marietta, which was made the main depot, the commissary department had ready for issue e subjected to unnecessary suffering. The wounded from the actions between Marietta and the Chattahoochee River were sent to the field hospital at Marietta, and tMarietta, and thence to the rear. Those from the actions in the front of Atlanta to the same hospital at Vining's Station, or were treated in the division hospitals. The wounded f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
l within view of Pine Top, which is an isolated hill just to the south of the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road. Here we encountered the enemy's skirmishers. Pressing them back we discovered that Pinecovered that the enemy had gone, I directed General Stanley, at 6 a. m., to push forward toward Marietta, which he did, followed by the other two divisions. He encountered the enemy's skirmishers near Wallace's house, on the Marietta road, about three-quarters of a mile from Noyes' Creek, beyond which he drove the enemy with his infantry and artillery. General Newton came np and did the same onrom camp in pursuit of the enemy at 5 a. m., Stanley's division leading. After passing through Marietta the corps followed a route to the left of the railroad and came upon the enemy's skirmishers near Neal Dow Station, between three and four miles south of Marietta. Stanley's division was deployed confronting the enemy, the right resting on the railroad, and the other two divisions were massed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
f the Chattahoochee. From the evening of the 19th to the morning of the 23d we remained in camp at Cassville preparing for our movement upon Dallas and thence Marietta. The order was to take twenty days rations, but this division was only enabled, from limited transportation, to carry seventeen days. The division crossed the Eorris Hill Chapel. The division remained in position at Morris Hill until the morning of the 10th, when, moving through the lines of the Twentieth Corps, on the Marietta road, we soon struck the pickets of the enemy. Pushing forward, the enemy was found in force, with an intrenched line extending across the summit of Pine Top More extended, relieving all of General Newton's division. Early the morning of the 3d, finding the enemy gone, the division followed their trail, leading through Marietta and taking the road east of the railroad leading to Pace's Ferry. This division was in the lead and had some little skirmishing, and in the evening came again u
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ing of June 10 General Cruft was ordered to Chattanooga on account of severe sickness, and I had the honor to assume command. Moved out on the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road in advance of the division, deployed the Twenty-first Illinois and Thirty-first Indiana as skirmishers; the line soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmiirmish and artillery firing. July 2, late p. m. moved to the left and relieved a portion of General Newton's line. July 3, enemy evacuated, brigade marched via Marietta, and bivouacked in front of enemy, in rear of General Grose's brigade, five miles south of Marietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pusheMarietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pushed forward a strong skirmish line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5, enemy evacuated, brigade marched to the Chattahoochee River. July 6, 7, 8, and 9, occupied same position. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
orks located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunset threw up light works and remained there until the morning of the 17th, when it was found there was no enemy in our front, he having evacuated under cover of darkness. We followed in line l the 3d day of July, 1864, when the enemy having left his strong position under cover of night, we moved out at 6 a. m., halting at Marietta College for a short time, then marched until 4 p. m., when we halted for the night five miles south of Marietta. On the morning of the 4th my command was ordered to support the skirmishers. We advanced in easy supporting distance until we came into a large open field, which had two ravines running parallel with my line. Here the enemy greeted me with a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
emy's lines. After the withdrawal of Newton's division, were again moved to the front line. In so doing Captain Harris, Company K, was wounded in the leg. Remained at this point alternately on front and rear lines till July 2. In the month of June the Thirty-eighth lost 1 commissioned officer and 26 enlisted men wounded, 1 enlisted man killed. On the night of July 2 moved to the left and relieved the One hundredth Illinois on picket. July 3, moved with the brigade several miles past Marietta. July 4, Captain Patrick, in command of the picket detail, was wounded in advancing the line, causing the loss of his left arm. July 5, moved to Vining's Station, near the Chattahoochee; laid there till the 10th, and were moved to the left. July 12, crossed the river, threw up works on a high ridge near the river, and laid there till the 18th. July 18 and 19, moved with the brigade in the direction of Atlanta. July 20, crossed Peach Tree Creek, and when lines were formed were placed in s
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