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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 365 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 80 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 36 14 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 30 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) or search for Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
ated a movement of at least two columns on Brandy Station, an intermediate point on the Orange and A To effect the contemplated junction near Brandy Station, the Beverly ford column would bear to thees, and it lay directly on the road toward Brandy Station, our rendezvous with the Kelly's ford colus ford column, and our own progress toward Brandy Station had been greatly delayed; but nothing coulwas quiet, with no enemy in sight. Toward Brandy Station a high hill confronted us, shutting off alther trustworthy sources. Before reaching Brandy Station, Colonel Duffie had turned to his left, ho General Gregg had advanced directly upon Brandy Station without opposition, and thence to the Fleeill is a ridge of ground, half a mile from Brandy Station, toward the Rappahannock, and west of the ng his attack, had borne to his right from Brandy Station until he came into connection with the Bevntime the enemy were pouring infantry into Brandy Station by railroad from Culpepper Court-House, in
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
all times and places, the most desperate and gallant efforts to win it back. In the early part of June, 1863, the rebel cavalry corps was assembled about Brandy Station, and in front of that point on the Rappahannock river. There had been reviews and inspections preparatory to making some great movement; this was suspected telly's Ford. Agreeably to orders from the corps commander, Colonel Dufie proceeded at once to Stevensburg to take position, while Gregg marched directly upon Brandy Station, which, owing to the number of miles to be marched and obstructions met in the roads, he did not reach until some hours after Buford's attack had been made. conspicuous gallantry and daring were applauded and remembered for imitation on other fields. Even now, when there is a meeting of any of those who fought at Brandy Station, and the talk falls upon the fight, the pulse quickens and the eye brightens as the story is repeated. Our cavalry was again reorganized in two divisions,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
on the broad open fields which lie between Brandy Station and Culpepper Court-House. On the eveningence there situated. The hill is between Brandy Station and the river, about half a mile from the regiments be detached to guard our rear at Brandy Station; but learning from Robertson that a columnthat point, which is about five miles from Brandy Station. The Fourth Virginia, Colonel Wickham, wa Kelley's ford in force and unopposed upon Brandy Station, and that he was now directly in our rear.nts decided the struggle in our favor, and Brandy Station was soon cleared of its unwelcome visitorsders were received to fall back rapidly to Brandy Station, the Yankees being in my rear. I had reporned that the enemy was advancing upon the Brandy Station road, and dispatched Captain Worthington wnt to Stevensburg, and that troops were at Brandy Station. Before receiving this message, I had coneft near Kelley's ford, when I advanced on Brandy Station, on June 9th, 1863, from my recollection. [3 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
me then), and Stuart's cavalry, concentrated at Culpepper Court-House. In the meantime a large force of the Federals, cavalry and infantry, had been thrown across the Rappahannock, and sent to attack General Stuart. They were encountered at Brandy Station, on the morning of the 9th, and repulsed. General Lee says of this engagement: On the 9th, a large force of Federal cavalry, strongly supported by infantry, crossed the Rappahannock at Beverly's ford, and attacked General Stuart. A severe efensive tactical, plan of the campaign, as agreed upon, should never have been abandoned after we entered the enemy's country. Second, if there ever was a time when the abandonment of that plan could have promised decisive results, it was at Brandy Station, where, after Stuart had repulsed the force thrown across the river, we might have fallen on that force and crushed it, and then put ourselves in position, threatening the enemy's right and rear, which would have dislodged him from his positi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
pahannock, and sent to attack Stuart. They were encountered at Brandy Station, on the morning of the 9th, and repulsed. General Longstreet auford's Division of cavalry and Ames' infantry, and join him at Brandy Station. The two fords were about eight miles apart, Brandy Station beBrandy Station being nearly in the apex of the triangle, three miles south of the river, and a good position from which to operate on Culpepper, in case it becthe river, but hearing General Gregg's guns in the direction of Brandy Station, and knowing he would expect me to connect with him in that vicnce his right, while the left was extended in the direction of Brandy Station. The enemy's cavalry, well supplied with artillery, fought withe enemy were running trains full of infantry from Culpepper to Brandy Station, and massing them in the woods near the residence of John Minor was the action of Beverly ford, which General Longstreet calls Brandy Station. It was a roconnoissance in force, in which some of the hardes
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
minster, Maryland, to guard the army trains. Since crossing the Potomac on the 27th of June, the column had marched steadily day and night. Previously, it had been on incessant duty since the opening of the campaign on the 9th of June at Brandy Station, and now, having been for many days without food or forage, the division arrived with wearied men and jaded horses upon the field of Gettysburg. Its numerical strength had, moreover, been considerably reduced, for many horses and men had dro gallop. Hampton's battle-flag floated in the van of the brigade. The orders of the Confederate officers could be heard by those in the woods on their left: Keep to your sabres, men, keep to your sabres! for the lessons they had learned at Brandy Station and at Aldie had been severe. There the cry had been: Put up your sabres! Draw your pistols and fight like gentlemen! But the sabre was never a favorite weapon with the Confederate cavalry, and now, in spite of the lessons of the past, the
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
rms, regardless of roads, came into the main road from Culpepper Court-House to Fredericksburg, and turning to the right, attacked the cavalry protecting Pope's extreme left and drove it across the Rappahannock at Ellis' mill. Turning toward Brandy Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, the command found that General Lee, with Longstreet's Corps, had established his headquarters at Willis Madden's house. Continuing its march, it crossed the railroad and rejoined Stuart, who, with Jackhisky or brandy entitled to be put on the credit side of the sheet. In the ensuing campaign of 1863, the Black Horse constituted a part of Stuart's cavalry division, and participated in the battle of Chancellorsville, the severe fight at Brandy Station, and in all the movements conducted by Stuart to mask the movements of Lee's army in the Valley of Virginia as it was being marched for the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. At Aldie, in the county of Loudon, the Black Horse, under comm
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The mistakes of Gettysburg. (search)
broken through the advice of General Early, and that in this attack Hood's and McLaws' Divisions did the best fighting ever done on any field, and encountered and drove back virtually the whole of the Army of the Potomac. I held that the mistakes of the Gettysburg campaign were: First, the change of the original plan of the campaign, which was to so maneuvre as to force the Federals to attack us; second, that if the plan was to have been changed at all it — should have been done at Brandy Station, near Culpepper Court-House, when we could have caught Hooker in detail, and, probably, have crushed his army; third, that Stuart should never have been permitted to leave the main route of march, and thus send our army into the enemy's country without cavalry for reconnoissance or foraging purposes; fourth, that the crushing defeat inflicted on the advance of the Federal army in the casual encounter of the 1st, at Willoughby's run, should have been pushed to extremities, that occasion f