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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 70 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Argolis (Greece) or search for Argolis (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1 (search)
the dragon's teeth grew up a crop of earth-born giants; and of these Ares saved a scanty band, and their children's children people the city of Cadmus. Hence sprung Creon, son of Menoeceus, king of this land; and Creon became the father of this lady Megara, whom once all Cadmus' race escorted with the glad music of lutes at her wedding, when the famous Heracles led her to my halls. Now he, my son, left Thebes where I was settled, left his wife Megara and her kin, eager to make his home in Argolis, in that walled town which the Cyclopes built, from which I am exiled for the slaying of Electryon; so he, wishing to lighten my affliction and to find a home in his own land, offered Eurystheus a mighty price for my recall: to free the world of savage monsters, whether it was that Hera goaded him to submit to this, or that fate was leagued against him. Other toils he has accomplished, and last of all has he passed through the mouth of Taenarus into the halls of Hades to drag to the light
Euripides, Heracles (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 451 (search)
ung ones and mothers, all together. Alas! for my sad fate and my children's, whom these eyes now for the last time behold. So I gave you birth and reared you only for our foes to mock, to jeer at, and slay. Ah me! how bitterly my hopes have disappointed me in the expectation I once formed from the words of your father. Addressing each of her sons in turn To you your dead father was for giving Argos; and you were to dwell in the halls of Eurystheus, lording it over the fair fruitful land of Argolis; and over your head would he throw that lion's skin with which he himself was armed. And you were to be king of Thebes, famed for its chariots, receiving as your heritage my broad lands, for so you coaxed your dear father; and to your hand he used to resign the carved club, his sure defence, pretending to give it to you. And to you he promised to give Oechalia, which once his archery had wasted. Thus with three principalities would your father exalt you, his three sons, proud of your man