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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 12 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 10 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge). You can also browse the collection for Tyre (Lebanon) or search for Tyre (Lebanon) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

M. Tullius Cicero, On the Agrarian Law (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 1 (search)
. . . . That which was then openly sought, is now endeavoured to be effected secretly by mines. For the decemvirs will say, what indeed is said by many, and has often been said,—that after the consulship of those men, all that kingdom became the property of the Roman people, by the bequest of the king Alexander. Will you then give Alexandria Alexander, king of Egypt, had died at Tyre in the consulship of Cotta and Torquatus, two years before, and had bequeathed Alexandria and Egypt to the Roman people, and in consequence many people advocated the course of claiming that inheritance, and depriving Ptolemy the king of Egypt. The subject will be mentioned again in the next oration. to those men when they ask for it in an underhand way, whom you resisted when they openly fought against you? Which, in the name of the immortal gods, do these things seem to you,—the designs of sober men, or
M. Tullius Cicero, On the Agrarian Law (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 16 (search)
king Alexander? Here now I, the consul of the Roman people, not only give no decision, but I do not even express my opinion. For it appears to me a most important matter not merely to decide oil, but even to speak of. I see a man who assures me that the will was certainly made; I know that there is a resolution of the senate extant to the effect that it accepted the inheritance; which was passed when, after the death of Alexander, we sent ambassadors to Tyre, to recover for the people money which had been deposited there by him. I recollect that Lucius Philippus has often stated these things positively in the senate. I see that is agreed upon by all men, that he, who is at this present moment in possession of the kingdom, is neither of the royal family nor of any royal disposition. It is said, on the other hand, that there is no will; that the Roman people ought not to seem to covet every kingdom under t