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Chapter 10: plantation-life. Reception at Galveston. reasons for retiring from the army. generosity to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shooting. close observation of the habits of animals. the crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrations of his character and plantation-life from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on rhetoric, mathemat
Chapter 11: Paymaster in United States Army. Reception at Galveston. reasons for retiring from the army. generosity to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shooting. close observation of the habits of animals. the crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrations of his character and plantation-life from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on r
ainst the enemy in this order: First, with Bledsoe's and Saunders's independent cavalry companies a-a vanguard, Zollicoffer's brigade ; thus Walthall's Fifteenth Mississippi Regiment in advance, followed by Rutledge's battery, and Cummings's Nineteenth, Battle's Twentieth, and Stanton's Twenty-fifth Tennessee Regiments. Then came Carroll's brigade, as follows: Newman's Seventeenth, Murray's Twenty-eighth, and Powell's Twenty-ninth Tennessee Regiments, with two guns under Captain McClung, and Wood's Sixteenth Alabama Regiment in reserve. Branner's and McClelland's battalions of cavalry were placed on the flanks and rear. A cold rain continued to fall upon the thinly-clad Confederates, chilling them to the marrow, but they toiled painfully along. The road was rough, and very heavy with the long rain following severe freezes. Unencumbered with artillery, the infantry would have made poor progress in the darkness, rain, and mud, but, as the guns from the first began to mire down,
her Confederate advance. Thayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General Lew Wallace, as described, at right angles to the intrenchments. The First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, were on the right; Wood's battery in the centre ; and to the left, a detached company and the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steadman, the left of the line being obliquely retired so as to front an approach from the trenches. The line of reserve consisted of the Seventy-six Colms's battalion. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson defend the second line. In this last engagement, while Smith was attacking with Lauman's brigade, the Twelfth Iowa, Colonel Wood, and the Fiftieth Illinois, Colonel Bane, of Cook's brigade, also joined in the attack on his immediate right; and Morgan L. Smith's brigade farther still to the right. These were all fresh troops. Besides these, Cruft's brigade, part of Tha
and the Texas Rangers and Forrest's cavalry unattached. The brigade-commanders were Hindman, Cleburne, Carroll, Statham, Wood, Bowen, and Breckinridge. There were represented in the army thirty-five regiments and five battalions of infantry, seven warfare is indebted to the Confederates. Morgan's first raid was begun on the afternoon of March 7th. With Lieutenant-Colonel Wood, ten rangers, and fifteen of his own squadron, he advanced along by-roads eighteen miles from Murfreesboro towarrs, however, with a large number of horses, mules, sabres, pistols, saddles, etc. Encouraged by this essay, he and Colonel Wood, with forty men, again set out from Murfreesboro, secretly and in separate parties, on the afternoon of the 15th. Thein the direction of Purdy. This army corps, moving to join Bragg, is about 20,000 strong. Two brigades, Hindman's and Wood's, are, I suppose, at Corinth. One regiment of Hardee's division (Lieutenant-Colonel Patton commanding) is moving by car
lution to attack: The First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Divisions, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals Thomas, McCook, Nelson, Crittenden, and Wood, with a contingent force of cavalry, in all 37,000 effective men, constituted the main army, which, under the personal command of General Buell, was to join Generanding to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick CreeWood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18
d, that he must crush Grant before Buell joined him. This was the purpose, this was the plan of the battle of Shiloh. When night fell, on the eve of battle, the following was the Confederate array: The front line, composed of the Third Corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's brigade was on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, composed of Wood's brigade, and his own under Colonel Shaver. These occupied the centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg, and put under Hardee's command for the battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, and Gladden added 2,235 more — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards
rman's division woke to find the foe pressing right upon them. Hindman, leading Wood's brigades along the direct road to Shiloh, had the advantage of a ridge and of as they pushed on in their victorious career, part of Shaver's brigade coming to Wood's assistance, breaking in on the left flank of the Illinois regiments. Assaileds too gave way. In their demolition, Waterhouse's battery fell into the hands of Wood's brigade. It was charged and taken by the Sixteenth Alabama and Twenty-seventhich had been forced on the centre and right by the dashing charges of Gladden's, Wood's, and Hindman's brigades. The centre of the morass was impassable, and the ain that he had no thought of yielding. During the morning Grant ordered General Wood, one of Buell's division commanders, to hasten to Pittsburg, and later sentoops were ordered to bivouac upon the field of battle. Speaking elsewhere of Wood's brigade, he incidentally remarks: This brigade was by my order moved for
vision, with Gibson's brigade, and the Thirty-third Tennessee (of Stewart's brigade), and the Twenty-seventh Tennessee (of Wood's brigade), was called on to resist the onset of Grant's reorganized forces, which were now led to the attack by Sherman. h sides desisted from the struggle. Just as the fighting ceased, the Federals were reinforced by two fresh brigades of Wood's division which came up. In the mean time, under Beauregard's direction, Breckinridge had formed Statham's brigade atn. Sherman advanced with two brigades and the Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and, receiving the support of a column from General Wood, proceeded cautiously on a reconnaissance. Marching with Hildebrand's unfortunate Third Brigade in front, he came upoe startled troopers, driving them in tumultuous rout and slaying them, until they came upon the main line of Sherman's and Wood's brigades. Forrest, carried away by the ardor of the combat, outstripped his own men and many of the enemy, and came wit
ing a clean sweep of every thing; so that, from our constant boldness, the enemy were bewildered, and knew not on which flank to look for Stuart's ubiquitous troopers; for they were successively here, there, and everywhere, burning, capturing, annoying, or fighting, and, by their activity and nerve, seemed to magnify their numbers tenfold. The first week in cold, bleak December had passed over our cheerless lines, and every expedient was resorted to by our troops to keep themselves warm. Wood was scarce to the front in many places, and our men on duty could be seen blowing their fingers and holding conversation with Federal guards ; Amusing conversations frequently occurred between outposts on the river banks: How are you, rebels? asked a Yankee, one cold morning, blowing his fingers. Oh! Not very good to-day, was the reply. We have suffered an awful loss! Jackson has resigned P Jackson resigned! was the astonished exclamation in rejoinder. Why, how was that?
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