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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 71 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 6 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
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Chapter 6: The pursuit immense booty our prisoners and their behavior a ride over the field of action incidents of the fight arrival of President Davis during the action, and its effect behavior of the New York fire Zouaves the victorious army did not advance upon Washington or Maryland Reconquers on the field of battle personal appearance of President Davis sketches of Evans and Longstreet. Though a general pursuit was ordered, it was found impossible to overtake the enemy, so precipitate had been their flight; and as we advanced, the signs of the dreadful combat of that day seemed to multiply at every step. The dead and dying are common to every battle-field; but here were broken cannon-wheels, deserted camps, overturned caissons, large supplies of commissary stores, files of prisoners, captured wagons, maimed and staggering animals, dead horses, cannons in the mud — innumerable proofs of the haste, confusion, and discomfiture of the enemy. Now small squa
Chapter 37: The pursuit of McClellan continued where is old Jackson? the Federal troops kept in ignorance of their retreat use of Federal cavalry the Seventh New York battle of Malvern Hill desperate engagement, July first reckless sacrifice of life by Magruder gallantry of Colonel Norman the enemy, fully routed and demoralized, seek protection under their gunboats. Wearied beyond all expression by the continual marching and fighting of the past week, I procured a bundle of hay and a few handfuls of corn for my jaded horse, and throwing myself down on a heap of straw beneath the pines, sought some little rest. The continual movement of troops, however, through the night, passing and repassing by a single road within a few feet of me, disturbed my slumber, and half asleep or awake, I heard all kinds of voices and noises around me. Huger's division had at last arrived somewhere in the neighborhood. Jackson's, Longstreet's, and other divisions were distributed
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
In his official report of the battle, Custer mistakes the names of the roads on which he held position. He erroneously calls the Hanover or Bonaughtown road the York pike, and the Salem Church road the Oxford road. He states, however: At an early hour on the morning of the 3d, I received an order, through a staff officernated, when a staff officer of Brigadier General Gregg, commanding Second Division, ordered me to take my command and place it in position on the pike leading from York to Gettysburg, which position formed the extreme right of our battle on that day. Upon arriving at the point designated, I immediately placed my command in positiod fifty men to be sent one mile and a half on the Oxford road, while a detachment of equal size was sent one mile and a half on the road leading from Gettysburg to York, both detachments being under the command of the gallant Major Webber, who, from time to time, kept me so well informed of the movements of the enemy that I was en
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The War's Carnival of fraud. (search)
missioner, Navy Department. No one could ask more. In fact, no subordinate ever had a more honorable, untiring, prompt or patriotic superior than I found, for the next year and a half, in Assistant Secretary Fox. An attempt was made at one time to make political capital out of an alleged expression of his in a letter to me, that a certain naval court-martial was organized to convict. The only thing Mr. Fox ever said (in response to my particular request that the court to try these New York cases should be composed of none but high-toned and fearless officers, without any political bias or aspiration) was, that I need not fear but that the guilty would be convicted, and punished if proven guilty. His official letter of February 18th, now first published, shows the whole attitude of the Navy Department toward this question of abuses and toward myself. Senator Hale, of New Hampshire, from his place in the Senate openly charged Mr. Fox with having instructed me to inquire into
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
o so partial a limit, at the end of three years nf lavish expenditure and bloodshed? The opening of the campaign of 1862 found the Federalists firmly seated upon the coast of South Carolina at Beaufort, and of North Carolina at Fort Macon, Newberne, and Roanoke Island. On the eastern borders of Virginia, they occupied Fortress Monroe, and Newport News, all the lower peninsula between the James and York Rivers, and the mouth of the Rappahannock. Near the ancient towns of Williamsburg and York, General Magruder, with a few thousand men, held their superior numbers at bay: and his guns maintained a precarious command over the channels of the two rivers. Around Washington, swarmed the Grand Army of General McClellan, upon both banks of the Potomac; while its wings extended from the lower regions of the State of Maryland, to the Alleghanies. It was confronted by the army of General Joseph E. Johnston, with its right wing resting upon the Potomac to Evansport, and commanding the riv
, reaching there on the 27th of June. Hooker, falling rapidly back upon Washington-at which point he believed the movement aimed-had been sacrificed, and with more justice than usual, to popular clamor. General Geo. G. Meade replaced him in command, and strained every nerve to collect numbers of men, irrespective of quality — seeming to desire to crush the invasion by weight alone. Wild was the alarm in the North when the rebel advance had, penetrated the heart of Pennsylvania; when York was held by Early and laid under contribution and Harrisburg was threatened by Ewell. The whole North rose in its might. Governors Seymour, of New York, Andrew, of Massachusetts, and Curtin, of Pennsylvania, put their whole militia at the service of the President; the energy at Washington, momentarily paralyzed, soon recovered; and by the last day of the month, Meade had collected an army of near 200,000 men. Many of these were, of course, new levies and raw militia; but near one-half were
urthouse, Virginia, May 13, 1861. First blood of the war. Naturally, many conflicting statements as to the last effective shot of the long struggle were made and received as true. The most reliable would appear to be the followingt reproduced from a paper printed by the boys of Mr. Denson's school, in the village of Pittsboro, N. C., in 1866: The accomplished author of that series of interesting papers, The last ninety days of the war in North Carolina, published in The Watchman, New York, states that the last blood of the war was shed near the Atkins plantation, a few miles from Chapel Hill, on the 14th April, 1865. In a later number of the same paper, a member of the First Tennessee Cavalry says that it is a mistake; that companies F1 and F2 of the same regiment to which he belonged, skirmished sharply with the Federals on the 15th, and claims that this was the last blood shed. Both are in error: there was a skirmish near Mt. Zion church, two miles south-east of Pittsboro
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 23: at York and Wrightsville. (search)
French had been sent with the greater part of his cavalry to the mouth of the Conewago to burn two railroad bridges at that point and all others between there and York. Before reaching town Hays' and Smith's brigades were ordered into camp about two miles on the north of it at some mills near the railroad. Hoke's brigade under n reaching Hanover Junction and destroying the depot at that place and one or two bridges in the vicinity, but he did not destroy all the bridges between there and York, as one or two of them, as reported by him, were defended by a force of infantry. Colonel French succeeded in destroying the bridges over the Conewago at its mouth, and all between there and York, and on the 29th he was sent to complete the destruction of the bridges south of the town, over the Codorus, which he succeeded in doing, as the force defending them had retired. In compliance with my requisition some twelve or fifteen hundred pairs of shoes, all the hats, socks, and rations c
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 45: battle of Winchester. (search)
raxton's battalions had performed wonders. This affair occurred about 11 A. M., and a splendid victory had been gained. The ground in front was strewn with the enemy's dead and wounded, and some prisoners had been taken. But on our side, Major General Rodes had been killed, in the very moment of triumph, while conducting the attack of his division with great gallantry and skill, and this was a heavy blow to me. Brigadier General Godwin of Ramseur's division had been killed, and Brigadier General York of Gordon's division had lost an arm. Other brave men and officers had fallen, and we could illy bear the loss of any of them. Had I then had a fresh body of troops to push our victory, the day would have been ours, but in this action, in the early part of the day, I had present only about 7,000 muskets, about 2,000 cavalry and two battalions of artillery with about 30 guns; and they had all been engaged. Wharton's division and King's artillery had not arrived, and Imboden's cav
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
's Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23-24 s Company 460, 461 Woodstock, 368, 430, 454 Wounding of Jackson, 212 Wright, General, 83, 231, 233, 255, 257 Wright, General (U. S. A.), 392, 393 Wrightsville 235, 255, 259, 260-61- 262-63-64 Wynn, Captain, 215 Wynn's Mill, 60, 61, 62, 63 Wytheville, 466, 467 Yates' Ford, 12, 13 York, 253, 255, 258-64, 267 York, General, 423 York River, 57-58-59, 65 York River R. R., 77 York Road, 269-71, 273, 357 Young's Branch, 26 Zoar Church, 318-20, 322-23-24
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