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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 332 332 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 48 48 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 40 40 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 6 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 19th or search for July 19th in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 11 document sections:

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
ever characterized the citizens of the old Bay State,—in times of danger and alarm to manfully uphold and defend the glorious stripes and stars even unto death. The resolutions having been adopted, the town authorized the selectmen to borrow one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act recently passed by the Legislature in extra session. 1862. A special town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 19th of July. At this meeting a secesh flag, taken at the capture of New Orleans, was presented to the town by Captain Josiah Snow, formerly a citizen of Orleans. The town then voted to pay each of its citizens who would enlist in the military service of the United States, and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars; and to pay town aid of one dollar a week to each parent, wife, or child of every volunteer so enlisting. 1863. No formal town-meeting to act u
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
for that purpose. 1862. A call having been made by the President for an additional three hundred thousand men July 4th, a legal town-meeting was held on the 19th of July; at which it was voted that it is our bounden duty, now, henceforth, and for ever, to give our obedient, ready, and earnest response to the call; and we do resdoes not make the pay of the soldiers as good as the foregoing. 1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. August 26th, The seght dollars a month aid, or such sum as the district convention may agree upon. All of said appropriations are to be subjected to a committee of three. 1862. July 19th, Voted, that the treasurer borrow the sum of five hundred dollars to pay bounties offered to the four volunteers, as far as it will go. September 17th, Voted, t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
own, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 19th of July, the town voted to pay each person who shall enlist in the military service for three years, and be mustered in and crpropriated for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families, as provided by the law of the Commonwealth. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years service, and be credited to the quota of the town, a e. 1862. April 7th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to t, Thomas Leeburn, and James W. Hathaway were appointed to disburse the same in an equitable and proper manner. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years military service, and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
to transfer the duties of the committee chosen at the last meeting to the selectmen. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of twenty-one, selectmen was authorized to borrow money to carry into effect the votes of the town. 1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to open a recruiting-office, to pay a bounty of one hundred dolrs, in addition to what had already been voted for aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for thhousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated to encourage the enlistment of volunteers; eacth the citizens' General Recruiting Committee. July 25th, So much of the order passed on the 19th of July as restricted the payment of bounties to the inhabitants of Salem who should enlist prior to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
in crushing treason and restoring its authority in every part of the United States. 1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars, in addition to the sum to the families of volunteers, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to borrow one thousand dollars for aid to soldiers' families; also twenty-five hundredpport of the families of volunteers living in Palmer. 1862. A town-meeting was held on the 19th of July, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each voluntrly provide for their families while absent in the service. 1862. At a meeting held on the 19th of July, it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for tnish each soldier with a revolver. June 4th, The vote to furnish revolvers was reconsidered. July 19th, The finance committee were instructed to pay each volunteer from that town a bounty of one hu
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
he town-clerk during all the years of the war was Jonathan P. Smith. The town-treasurer during the same period was John T. Warner. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. A paper was signed by the tax-payers to agree to have the bounty-money raised by a tax upon property. n 1864 and 1865, Jabez Stanton. 1861. A special town-meeting was held in September, which voted to appropriate a sufficient sum to provide aid to the families of volunteers in the military service from that town as provided by law. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years to the credit of the town, and to raise eighteen hundred dollars to pay the same. August 23d, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men enlisting for nine
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
provided by the State law; but in any event they should receive sufficient to make them entirely comfortable. 1862. July 19th, The following resolution and vote were passed:— Resolved, That whereas the town of Lexington was the first to sealt purpose. 1862. April 28th, Six thousand five hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 19th, Ninety-two men for three years service having been called for as the quota of the town, it was voted to pay a bounty tder their services to the Government, and to provide for the families of the soldiers while in actual service. 1862. July 19th, Voted, unanimously, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years service, to the number of61. No legal town-meeting to consider matters in regard to the war appears to have been held during this year. 1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three year
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
and dollars for the above purpose, and to pay for an outfit for each volunteer and for time spent in drilling. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of seventeen, who shall enlist and be cathaniel Lyford, J. Murray Howe, James Bartlett, to whom the same powers in regard to military matters were continued. July 19th, The town voted to appropriate twelve thousand dollars for State aid to the families of volunteers, and for military put of the United States, or afford aid or sympathy to the plotters of Treason and Rebellion. 1862. At a meeting held July 19th, The town voted to give a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for threea book specially prepared for that purpose. April 7th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for military purposes. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to th
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
of such inestimable value must ever be a gratifying thought to the soldiers and citizens of Hingham. A vote of thanks was given to the committee for their services. Five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 19th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred dollars, which on the 15th of August was raised to two hundred dollars. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to nine-months volunteers. December 2d,ert C. Randall. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters in relation to the war was held on the 12th of October, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers as provided by act of the Legislature. 1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of the thirteen three-years volunteers required to fill the quota of the town, and to borrow thirteen hundred dollars for that purpose. August 28th, It was voted tha
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
iam T. Hall. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Benjamin H. Dewing; in 1865, John F. Fenno. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war during this year, although the families of the soldiers belonging to the town were properly cared for by the selectmen. 1862. March 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding seven hundred dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the quota of the town, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to pay the same. At this meeting a letter was read from Captain William B. Eaton of North Chelsea, commanding the United States barque Ethan Allen, presenting a rebel flag captured by him near Tampa Bay, Florida, from a blockade runner; which created much enthusiasm, and ca
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