hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Athens (Greece) 26 0 Browse Search
Delphi (Greece) 18 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 12 0 Browse Search
Parnassus (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Asia 6 0 Browse Search
Euboea (Greece) 4 0 Browse Search
Europe 4 0 Browse Search
Olympus (Greece) 2 0 Browse Search
Cyclades (Greece) 2 0 Browse Search
Pytho (Greece) 2 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter). Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 2 results.

Parnassus (Greece) (search for this): card 1261
Ion O Cephisus, her ancestor, with a bull's face, what a viper have you bred, or serpent that glares a deadly flame! She has dared all, she is no less than the Gorgon's blood, with which she was about to kill me. Seize her, so that the uplands of Parnassus, from which she will be hurled to make her stony leaps, may comb out those smooth tresses of her hair. I met with a good genius, before I came to the city of Athens, and fell into a stepmother's hands. For in the midst of allies I have taken the measure of your intent, what an unfriendly bane you were to me; if you had encompassed me in your own house, you would have sent me utterly to the house of Hades. But neither the altar nor Apollo's shrine will save you. Pity for you is greater for me and for my mother; although she is absent, yet the name is present. Look at that wicked creature, how she wove craft out of craft; she has fled cowering to the altar of the god, as if she thought she would not pay the penalty for her deed
Athens (Greece) (search for this): card 1261
Ion O Cephisus, her ancestor, with a bull's face, what a viper have you bred, or serpent that glares a deadly flame! She has dared all, she is no less than the Gorgon's blood, with which she was about to kill me. Seize her, so that the uplands of Parnassus, from which she will be hurled to make her stony leaps, may comb out those smooth tresses of her hair. I met with a good genius, before I came to the city of Athens, and fell into a stepmother's hands. For in the midst of allies I have taken the measure of your intent, what an unfriendly bane you were to me; if you had encompassed me in your own house, you would have sent me utterly to the house of Hades. But neither the altar nor Apollo's shrine will save you. Pity for you is greater for me and for my mother; although she is absent, yet the name is present. Look at that wicked creature, how she wove craft out of craft; she has fled cowering to the altar of the god, as if she thought she would not pay the penalty for her deeds