hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 99 5 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 68 0 Browse Search
Albert Sydney Johnston 67 1 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 65 3 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 50 0 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 50 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Grant 45 5 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 38 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia. Search the whole document.

Found 861 total hits in 303 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Wytheville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
some years before. He said that before the war communication had been kept up between them, and he had strongly suspected that he was in the army; he had consequently been in constant search of his brother. The Northern and Southern soldier then united in burying him, who was brother in arms of the one, and the mother's son of the other! The Bishop and Mrs. J. returned home to-day from their long trip in the South-west. They travelled with great comfort, but barely escaped a raid at Wytheville. We welcomed them gladly. So many of our family party are wandering about, that our little cottage has become lonely. Mr. C. has come out, and reports a furious bombardment of Sumter. This has been going on so long, that I begin to feel that it is indeed impregnable Wednesday, August 12, 1863. We are all pursuing the even tenor of our way, as if there were no war. An order from General Lee is in to-day's paper, exhorting officers and soldiers to a strict observance of fast-da
France (France) (search for this): chapter 33
mes River, I felt that I could be with him if he were wounded; but he is in God's hands: Be still, my heart; these anxious cares To thee are burdens, thorns, and snares. The papers full of the probable, or rather hopedfor, intervention of France. The proposition of the Emperor, contained in a letter from the Minister to Seward, and his artful, wily, Seward-like reply, are in a late paper. We pause to see what will be the next step of the Emperor. Oh that he would recognize us, and letght our people their own resources; but I often think that when the great veil is removed, and reveals us to the world, we will, in some respects, be a precious set of antiques. The ladies occasionally contrive to get a fashion-plate direct from France, by way of Nassau; yet when one of them, with a laudable zeal for enhancing her own charms by embellishments from abroad, sends gold to Nassau, which should be kept in our own country, and receives in return a trunk of foreign fabrics, she will a
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
in operation yesterday. The morning papers give the Northern account of a battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It gives the victory to the Federals, though it admits a very heavy loss on their sidrigadier-General Paul by death. We pause for the truth. July 8th, 1863. Accounts from Gettysburg very confused. Nothing seems to be known certainly; but Vicksburg has fallen! So says rumourous for such a foe. What can the meaning be? General Lee has had a most bloody battle near Gettysburg. Our loss was fearful. We have heard of no casualties except in general officers. General R14th, 1863. To-day spent in the hospital; a number of wounded there from the fatal field of Gettysburg. They are not severely wounded, or they could not have been brought so far. Port Hudson has f Lynchburg as he went on his way to the field, full of buoyancy and hope, is among the dead at Gettysburg. Also, Captain Austin Brockenbrough, of Essex County. Virginia had no son to whom a brighter
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ir own resources; but I often think that when the great veil is removed, and reveals us to the world, we will, in some respects, be a precious set of antiques. The ladies occasionally contrive to get a fashion-plate direct from France, by way of Nassau; yet when one of them, with a laudable zeal for enhancing her own charms by embellishments from abroad, sends gold to Nassau, which should be kept in our own country, and receives in return a trunk of foreign fabrics, she will appear on the streeNassau, which should be kept in our own country, and receives in return a trunk of foreign fabrics, she will appear on the street immediately afterwards in a costume which seems to us so new and fantastic, that we are forced to the opinion that we would appear to the world ludicrously passe. A gentleman, lately from Columbia, tells me that the South Carolina girls pride themselves on their palmetto hats; and the belle of large fortune, who used to think no bonnet presentable but one made by the first New York or Parisian milliner, now glories in her palmetto. The balmoral, too, the product of our own spinning-wheel and
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ery flower of our country. Again I have heard of the death of one of our dear E. H. S. boys-William H. Robb, of Westmoreland. He was with us for four years, and was very, very dear to us all. He died of wounds received in a cavalry fight at Brandy Station. We thought he had recovered, but this evening brought the fatal tidings. The news of the New York riots, which they got up in opposition to the draft, is cheering! Oh! that they could not get up another army, and would fight each other! s! The fearful list of killed and wounded, when so many of our nearest and dearest are engaged, is too full of anguish to anticipate without a sinking of heart which I have never known before. There was a little fight some days ago, near Brandy Station — the enemy driven across the river. Fredericksburg and Culpeper Court-House are both occupied by our troops. This is very gratifying to our Fredericksburg refugees, who are going up to see if they can recover their property. All movables
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
a trunk of foreign fabrics, she will appear on the street immediately afterwards in a costume which seems to us so new and fantastic, that we are forced to the opinion that we would appear to the world ludicrously passe. A gentleman, lately from Columbia, tells me that the South Carolina girls pride themselves on their palmetto hats; and the belle of large fortune, who used to think no bonnet presentable but one made by the first New York or Parisian milliner, now glories in her palmetto. The b offering other injury to the villagers. They belonged to Stoneman's command. They went over this county, Goochland, Louisa, and a part of Fluvanna, without molestation. They became alarmed, however, and cut their career short. They went to Columbia for the purpose of destroying the canal, but in their haste did it very little injury. The injury to the railroads was slight, and easily repaired. To individuals they did some mischief; at W. they fed four hundred horses at my brother's barn,
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
the house of mourning. Our neighbour Mrs. S. has lost her eldest son. The disease was that most fatal of Pandora's train, consumption. He contracted it in the Western Army. His poor mother has watched the ebbing of his life for several months, and last night he died most suddenly. That young soldier related to me an anecdote, some weeks ago, with his short, oppressed breathing and broken sentences, which showed the horrors of this fratricidal war. He said that the day after a battle in Missouri, in the Fall of 1861, he, among others, was detailed to bury the dead. Some Yankee soldiers were on the field doing the same thing. As they turned over a dead man, he saw a Yankee stop, look intently, and then run to the spot with an exclamation of horror. In a moment he was on his knees by the body, in a paroxysm of grief. It was his brother. They were Missourians. The brother now dead had emigrated South some years before. He said that before the war communication had been kept up
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
asure they take in receiving and entertaining Marylanders coming over to join us, and others who go to their house to bide their time for running the blockade to Maryland. Among others, she says, we have lately been honoured by two sprigs of English nobility, the Marquis of Hastings and Colonel Leslie of the British army. The Marinia, grave and dignified, yet bright with hope, seemed to be beckoning Kentucky on, who stood beyond the threshold, her eyes cast down with shame and suffering; Maryland was at the threshold, but held back by a strong hand; all the rest of the fair sisters were there in their appropriate places, forming a beautiful picture. I take pride in their own handiwork. I went to see Mrs.--to-day, daughter of one of our gentlemen high in position, and whose husband was a wealthy landholder in Maryland. I found her sitting at her sewing-machine, making an elaborate shirt-bosom. She said she took in sewing, and spoke of it very cheerfully. How can we rent roo
Mattapony River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
aving no shelter to cover them, and often nothing to eat, on that dark winter's night. June 7, 1863. We are living in fear of a Yankee raid. They have a large force on York River, and are continually sending parties up the Pamunky and Mattapony Rivers, to devastate the country and annoy the inhabitants. Not long ago a party rode to the house of a gentleman on Mattapony; meeting him on the lawn, the commander accosted him: Mr. R., I understand you have the finest horses in King William CoMattapony; meeting him on the lawn, the commander accosted him: Mr. R., I understand you have the finest horses in King William County? Perhaps, sir, I have, replied Mr. R. Well, sir, said the officer, I want those horses immediately. They are not yours, replied Mr. R, and you can't get them. The officer began to curse, and said he would burn every house on the place if the horses were not produced. Suiting the action to the word, he handed a box of matches to a subordinate, saying, Burn! In half an hour Mr. R. saw fourteen of his houses in a light blaze, including the dwelling, the kitchen, corn-houses and barn fill
Ashland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
is utter terror and dismay during its presence. Ashland, February 22d A very deep snow this morning. Tht time it was ever administered by Episcopalians in Ashland. There were fifty communicants, the large majorityartermaster's Department, and removed his family to Ashland for cheapness. He was very highly educated and generday, in a car, to Richmond. Almost every lady in Ashland visited the car, with a wreath or a cross of the moin she gathered up her little flock, and came on to Ashland. Her little threeyears old boy explored the boardi, and we are constantly expecting them to raid upon Ashland. We have a good force at The Junction, and at the e shall probably have to take the little cottage at Ashland, notwithstanding its reputation-either the cottage ands! Cedar Hill, October 4, 1863. We came to Ashland on the 29th, to attend the sale of the house in whiis much more convenient to live in Richmond than in Ashland, so that we have rented the little cottage to anoth
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...