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Lexington, Lafayette County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
rder to be countermanded. Supposing Early was moving up the Valley, Crook marched from Harper's Ferry on Winchester. When at Kernstown, a little beyond that city, he suddenly felt the heavy pressure of his foe on front and flank. His cavalry were pushed back July 23. on the main body, and on the following day Crook's entire force was driven, in some confusion, to Martinsburg, with a loss of twelve hundred men, including General Mulligan, See an account of Mulligan's defense of Lexington, in Missouri, volume II., page 69. who was killed. Early pursued as far as that town, and on the following day July 25. there was a sharp cannon fight there, which enabled Crook to get his trains safely across the Potomac. He followed with his troops, and Early was left sole master of the southern side of the river, from Shepherdstown to Williamsport. Emboldened by his success, and animated by the knowledge that he had many sympathizers in Maryland and Western Pennsylvania, Early sent about
Plunkett (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ed. As an engineering operation for the improvement of the river navigation, it was a success; as a military operation it was a failure. The work was done under the direction of Major Peter S. Michie, Acting Chief-Engineer of the Army of the James. The work on the canal was considerably advanced when the enterprise we are now considering was undertaken. According to arrangement, Ord and Birney crossed the river on, pontoon bridges muffled with hay on the night of the 28th, the former at Aiken's and the latter at Deep Bottom. Ord pushed along the Varina road at dawn. His chief commanders were Generals Burnham, Weitzel, Heckman, Roberts and Stannard, and Colonel Stevens. His van soon encountered the Confederate pickets, and after a march of about three miles, they came Huts at Dutch Gap. this was the appearance of the north bank of the James River, at Dutch Gap, when the writer sketched it, at the close of 1864. the bank was there almost perpendicular, and rose about thirt
Boydton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
he Confederate right, west of the Weldon road, 360. battle of the Boydton road, 361. Grant's campaign for 1864 and its results, 362. Sherirenched positions. But they were gradually pushed back toward the Boydton road, where the Nationals seized, held, and intrenched a position,ld swing round to the west side of Hatcher's Run, sweep across the Boydton road, and seize the Southside railway. These movements began beHancock, who was passing round further to the left, had gained the Boydton road near Burgess's mill, without much opposition, and with Gregg', with instructions to move up that stream in the direction of the Boydton road. Crawford soon found himself in an almost impenetrable swamplatter eagerly pursued the: fugitives over an open space along the Boydton road, when they were struck heavily by Eagan, who, on hearing the had gained no ground, when the struggle known as the battle of the Boydton road ended. In these encounters Hancock lost about fifteen hundre
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Maryland and Pennsylvania closely guarded against another raid, until he was ready to move in force offensively. He had been anxious to begin such movements; but Grant, made extremely cautious by late experiences, withheld consent, for, in the event of defeat, Maryland and Pennsylvania would be laid open for another invasion. In order to understand the situation in that region, Grant visited Sheridan at the middle of September. Sept. 16, 1864. I met him, says the Lieutenant-General, at Charlestown, and he pointed out so distinctly how each army lay; what he could do the moment he was authorized, and expressed such confidence of success, that I saw there were but two, words of instruction necessary-- Go in! In those two words and no more, Grant showed his unreserved confidence in Sheridan's ability; and the events of a few weeks satisfied him and the country that he had judged and trusted wisely. Sheridan's troops, at that time, lay in front of Berryville, on the turnpike leadi
Hatcher's Run (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
distance along its line, in the vicinity of its passage of a stream called Hatcher's Run. These works also constituted defenses for the Southside railroad, which ts cavalry division well to its left, should swing round to the west side of Hatcher's Run, sweep across the Boydton road, and seize the Southside railway. These mas repulsed; whereupon Warren, according to arrangement, proceeded to cross Hatcher's Run in an attempt to turn the Confederate flank and gain its rear. In the meanmed him that a division of Warren's corps was making its way to the west of Hatcher's Run, with instructions to form a connection with the Second Corps, and open they sending Crawford's division, supported by one of Ayres's brigades, across Hatcher's Run, at Armstrong's mill, with instructions to move up that stream in the direcisolated force before the remainder of the Army of the Potomac should cross Hatcher's Run. Heth moved so stealthily, that the first intimation of his presence was g
Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
oosen Warren's hold upon the Weldon road, and the Confederates gained nothing by their victory. For about a month after the battle of Reams's Station, there was comparative quiet along the lines of the opposing armies. During this time the Confederates made a bold and successful dash for food. General Hampton, with a heavy cavalry force, made a wide circuit around the National left from Reams's Station, Sept. 16. and swept down to Sycamore Church, near Coggins's Point, opposite Harrison's Landing, where he seized, and then drove back to the Confederate lines, 2,500 beef cattle, and carried with him about 300 men and their horses, of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania, who were guarding the herd; also 200 mules and 32 wagons. Hampton lost about 50 men. It was broken by General Grant, who, believing that only a few troops were then occupying the Confederate works on the north side of the James, ordered General Butler to cross over the river from Bermuda Hundred, with the Tenth and Eigh
Fort McAllister (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
afternoon by volleys of musketry and a furious charge upon Pierce's brigade of Mott's division. That startled brigade gave way, and left two guns. as spoil for the assailants. The latter eagerly pursued the: fugitives over an open space along the Boydton road, when they were struck heavily by Eagan, who, on hearing the sounds of battle in his rear, had changed front and hastened to the rescue. He swept down the plank road with the brigades of Smythe and Willett of his own division, and McAllister's brigade of Mott's division,.while the brigade of De Trobriand and Kirwin's dismounted cavalry advanced at the same time. The Confederates were driven back, the guns were recaptured, and a thousand of their men were made prisoners. Others, in their flight, to the number of two hundred, rushed into Crawford's lines, and were captured. Had that officer been ordered to advance at that moment, the capture or dispersion of Heth's whole force might have been the result. Ayres was on the way
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tteries of artillery. he swept rapidly down the Valley toward Williamsport. Sigel, too weak to resist the avalanche, fled July 3, 1864. into Maryland, with a heavy loss of stores, and General Weber, in command at Harper's Ferry, retired to Maryland Heights. Grant, meanwhile, had directed Hunter, who was then on the Kanawha, to hasten to Harper's Ferry with all possible dispatch; but insuperable obstacles kept him back until it was too late to be of essential service, and Early found no troopsan's Headquarters, and other localities of special interest, See page 475, volume II. and after a late dinner, went down the Antietam Valley to the Potomac, at the mouth of the Antietam Creek. Then we passed over the rugged hills west of Maryland Heights, and descending through gorges, passed along the margin of the river at the base of that historical eminence at twilight, and at dark reached Harper's Ferry. Having visited places of interest at and around Harper's Ferry, we left that pic
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
over the country toward the Pennsylvania line, plundering friend and foe alike of horses, cattle, provisions and money. This invasion produced great alarm, and caused the Government to issue an urgent call upon Pennsylvania, New York, and Massachusetts, for troops to meet it. The President called for 12,000 from Pennsylvania, and 5,000 each from New York and Massachusetts. Weber's Headquarters, Harper's Ferry. this spacious building, on the corner of Shenandoah and high streets, in theMassachusetts. Weber's Headquarters, Harper's Ferry. this spacious building, on the corner of Shenandoah and high streets, in the village of Harper's Ferry, and belonging to the Government, was used as Headquarters by all of the commanding officers there, of both parties, during the war. Vague rumors had reached General Wallace, at Baltimore, concerning the perils of Sigel. Then came positive information of the passage of the Potomac by the Confederates, and their raiding within the borders of General Couch's Department; and finally, on the 5th of July, he was informed that their movements indicated an intention to
Coggin's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
But this disaster did not loosen Warren's hold upon the Weldon road, and the Confederates gained nothing by their victory. For about a month after the battle of Reams's Station, there was comparative quiet along the lines of the opposing armies. During this time the Confederates made a bold and successful dash for food. General Hampton, with a heavy cavalry force, made a wide circuit around the National left from Reams's Station, Sept. 16. and swept down to Sycamore Church, near Coggins's Point, opposite Harrison's Landing, where he seized, and then drove back to the Confederate lines, 2,500 beef cattle, and carried with him about 300 men and their horses, of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania, who were guarding the herd; also 200 mules and 32 wagons. Hampton lost about 50 men. It was broken by General Grant, who, believing that only a few troops were then occupying the Confederate works on the north side of the James, ordered General Butler to cross over the river from Bermuda Hund
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