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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore).

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by whose blood it was purchased; and for the inestimable benefits it confers upon the present, and secures to future generations. Her noble response to the call of the President, in April last, was such as to preserve to her the proud title she has long borne in the family of States. Another stage in the great rebellion has been reached, and the Government, appreciating the dangers now menacing it, appeals for aid. The whole country, the civilized world, now looks to the State of New York. Let the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involved, temporarily relinquish their pursuits and prepare to meet the crisis. In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed [L. S.] the privy seal of this State, at the city of Albany, this 22d day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Edwin D. Morgan. By the Governor: Lockwood L. Doty, Private Secretary.
ement of the laws, and have thus invited a hearty and zealous response on the part of several States. New York has never wavered in her devotion to the Union. She prizes it on account of the many blessings which all parts of the country alike have received from it; on account of the memory of her patriot sons, by whose blood it was purchased; and for the inestimable benefits it confers upon the present, and secures to future generations. Her noble response to the call of the President, in April last, was such as to preserve to her the proud title she has long borne in the family of States. Another stage in the great rebellion has been reached, and the Government, appreciating the dangers now menacing it, appeals for aid. The whole country, the civilized world, now looks to the State of New York. Let the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involved, temporarily relinquish their
August 22nd (search for this): chapter 1
by whose blood it was purchased; and for the inestimable benefits it confers upon the present, and secures to future generations. Her noble response to the call of the President, in April last, was such as to preserve to her the proud title she has long borne in the family of States. Another stage in the great rebellion has been reached, and the Government, appreciating the dangers now menacing it, appeals for aid. The whole country, the civilized world, now looks to the State of New York. Let the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involved, temporarily relinquish their pursuits and prepare to meet the crisis. In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed [L. S.] the privy seal of this State, at the city of Albany, this 22d day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Edwin D. Morgan. By the Governor: Lockwood L. Doty, Private Secretary.
Edwin D. Morgan (search for this): chapter 1
Doc. 1. proclamation of Gov. Morgan, Governor of the State of New York. A conspiracy, not the work of a day, but the result of years, of false, wicked, and traitorous machinations, has for several months disturbed the peace of the State of New York and of the Federal Union. Its movements have been marked by violence and fraud. Wherever it has manifested itself, it has disregarded the rights of citizens, coerced them into the ranks of its armies, and exercised an absolute control ovet the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involved, temporarily relinquish their pursuits and prepare to meet the crisis. In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed [L. S.] the privy seal of this State, at the city of Albany, this 22d day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Edwin D. Morgan. By the Governor: Lockwood L. Doty, Private Secretary.
Doc. 1. proclamation of Gov. Morgan, Governor of the State of New York. A conspiracy, not the work of a day, but the result of years, of false, wicked, and traitorous machinations, has for several months disturbed the peace of the State of New York and of the Federal Union. Its movements have been marked by violence and fraud. Wherever it has manifested itself, it has disregarded the rights of citizens, coerced them into the ranks of its armies, and exercised an absolute control over person and property, in utter defiance of the Constitution and laws of the land. Ambitious and designing men, disappointed in their personal aims, have been enabled, chiefly by misrepresenting the feelings of one portion of the country toward the other, to usurp and exercise a power which has become not only tyrannical and oppressive in several States whose constitutional governments it has temporarily suspended, but dangerous to the entire Union; the pretences originally held forth as a jus
Lockwood L. Doty (search for this): chapter 1
by whose blood it was purchased; and for the inestimable benefits it confers upon the present, and secures to future generations. Her noble response to the call of the President, in April last, was such as to preserve to her the proud title she has long borne in the family of States. Another stage in the great rebellion has been reached, and the Government, appreciating the dangers now menacing it, appeals for aid. The whole country, the civilized world, now looks to the State of New York. Let the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involved, temporarily relinquish their pursuits and prepare to meet the crisis. In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed [L. S.] the privy seal of this State, at the city of Albany, this 22d day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Edwin D. Morgan. By the Governor: Lockwood L. Doty, Private Secretary.
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Doc. 1. proclamation of Gov. Morgan, Governor of the State of New York. A conspiracy, not the work of a day, but the result of years, of false, wicked, and traitorous machinations, has for several months disturbed the peace of the State of New York and of the Federal Union. Its movements have been marked by violence andState of New York and of the Federal Union. Its movements have been marked by violence and fraud. Wherever it has manifested itself, it has disregarded the rights of citizens, coerced them into the ranks of its armies, and exercised an absolute control over person and property, in utter defiance of the Constitution and laws of the land. Ambitious and designing men, disappointed in their personal aims, have been enableion has been reached, and the Government, appreciating the dangers now menacing it, appeals for aid. The whole country, the civilized world, now looks to the State of New York. Let the response be worthy of her history. Let her answer go back in full ranks of earnest men, who, justly valuing the magnitude of the interests involve
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
necessity of an earnest and zealous co-operation with the authorities of the State and General Governments; of a cheerful contribution of their means to support the public credit, and of active enrolment in the forces now being organized for the defence of the Union; convinced that the tranquillity of the country, so wantonly disturbed, can only be restored by the prompt and vigorous suppression of rebellion and treason, wherever they may appear. The representatives of the people of the United States, lately convened in Congress at the call of a constitutionally-elected President, in view of the perils which surround the Union, have, by legislative enactments, provided for liberal supplies of men and means for the enforcement of the laws, and have thus invited a hearty and zealous response on the part of several States. New York has never wavered in her devotion to the Union. She prizes it on account of the many blessings which all parts of the country alike have received from it;
Doc. 2. army Sanitary Commission. Statement of its operations. among the objects to which the funds of the commission are applied are the following: 1. The employment of medical inspectors to visit the various camps, and to remedy the numerous sources of disease and danger that exist in all of them — as, for instance, defects in drainage and ventilation, in the quality or preparation of food, uncleanliness in tents and quarters, insufficiency of clothing, the situation of camps with reference to malaria, &c., &c., &c. Six inspectors are now employed. At least four times as many are required. Their travelling and other expenses are estimated at the rate of fifteen hundred dollars per annum. 2. Inspectors are also needed at the general hospitals, to see that the volunteers are provided with every care and comfort that can be obtained. The Commission also supplies these hospitals (to the extent of its means) with sundry medical and surgical appliances, extra hosp
George T. Strong (search for this): chapter 2
g and bedding, and various other articles not issued by Government, and employs additional nurses and dressers. 3. The Commission prints and circulates among the volunteers (both officers and men) rules to be observed in regard to sanitary points, and advice as to the means of preserving health while in the field. It is in the daily receipt of stores of various kinds, clothing, bedding, &c., which are distributed from its office in Washington. Funds are required to meet the expenses of their transportation and storage. For means to carry out these objects the Commission relies wholly on the liberality of the community. It does not apply to Government for funds, because its moral influence and power of usefulness would be destroyed by any real or supposed connection with political agencies; and also, because it could not expect to obtain from Government means sufficient for the work it has undertaken. Geo. T. Strong, Treasurer. 68 Wall Street, New York, August 23, 1861.
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