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Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
United States steamer Galena, off City point, James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that this vessel, the Aroostook, the Monitor, and Port Royal, with the Naugatuck, moved up the river yesterday, getting aground several times, but meeting no artificial impediments until we arrived at Ward's Bluff, about cuous for his gallant and effective services. Mr. Washburne, Acting Master, behaved admirably. These two are selected from among the number. The Aroostook, Port Royal, and Naugatuck took the stations previously assigned them, and did every thing that was possible. The Monitor could not have done better. The barrier is sucst action and left them at the hospital there. The squadron to which we were attached, consisting, besides the Stevens, of the Galena, Monitor, Aroos took, and Port Royal, worked our way up James River, and at a battery at a place called Harding's Bluff, (about five miles above Day's Point,) we saw the rebel steamers Yorktown and
Day's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Davis. Letter to Captain Faunce. U. S. Gunboat Stevens, Hampton roads, May 19. my dear Captain: We arrived here yesterday from Norfolk, having brought down the killed and part of the wounded in our last action and left them at the hospital there. The squadron to which we were attached, consisting, besides the Stevens, of the Galena, Monitor, Aroos took, and Port Royal, worked our way up James River, and at a battery at a place called Harding's Bluff, (about five miles above Day's Point,) we saw the rebel steamers Yorktown and Jamestown, but they ran from us, ascending the river. When we arrived at City Point we found the storehouses there, containing tobacco, etc., in flames, and nearly consumed. On the evening of the fourteenth inst., we arrived about ten miles below Richmond. The Stevens had led the squadron, keeping about two hundred yards ahead of the Galena, sounding out the channel, and looking out for obstructions and torpedoes. We were (on account of our l
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Wounded: George Morris, Commander, flesh wound of right leg. Naugatuck.--James Wilson, musket-shot, not serious; Peter Dixon, not seriously. Lieutenant Constable's letters: letter to his mother. United States gunboat E. A. Stevens, Hampton roads, May 18. my dear mother: I have to thank God for a life preserved under circumstances where it even now seems impossible that I could have escaped. On the fifteenth instant the squadron to which my vessel is attached, had a four hours forning, and I have not yet retired, which is rather late for a person who has not had his clothes off for the last eighteen days and nights . . . . . Yours, affectionately, Davis. Letter to Captain Faunce. U. S. Gunboat Stevens, Hampton roads, May 19. my dear Captain: We arrived here yesterday from Norfolk, having brought down the killed and part of the wounded in our last action and left them at the hospital there. The squadron to which we were attached, consisting, besides t
Ward's Hill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
e squadron. From information which we had gained, we learned that the enemy had, about two miles above us, heavy obstructions across the river, consisting of spiles and sunken vessels, defended by a very strong battery on a high bluff, called Ward's Hill. This Ward's Hill was but eight miles below Richmond, and at a council of war held on board the flag-ship, (the Galena,) consisting of the commanders of the five vessels, it was arranged that the squadron should the next morning attack the Ward's Hill was but eight miles below Richmond, and at a council of war held on board the flag-ship, (the Galena,) consisting of the commanders of the five vessels, it was arranged that the squadron should the next morning attack the battery in the order arranged. If successful in shelling them out, the Stevens was to haul out the spies, while men from the squadron spiked the guns. I was provided with a chain for the purpose, and intended pumping out aft and submerging forward until making fast, and heaving taut — then pump out forward, and submerge aft to loosen the spile in its hold, and then haul upon it until drawn, etc., etc. We likewise learned that the enemy had rifle-pits well manned; and even while at anchor o
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ter the fight was over, and the squadron commenced falling back for want of ammunition, I fainted away and was taken below, where, after being cupped behind the ears, I was again enabled to take charge of the vessel. This morning I arrived at Norfolk with the killed and wounded of the squadron, and reached here at one o'clock this afternoon. I find that I cannot be made ready for another heavy gun without a thorough overhauling and great waste of precious time, consequently I have tendereho has not had his clothes off for the last eighteen days and nights . . . . . Yours, affectionately, Davis. Letter to Captain Faunce. U. S. Gunboat Stevens, Hampton roads, May 19. my dear Captain: We arrived here yesterday from Norfolk, having brought down the killed and part of the wounded in our last action and left them at the hospital there. The squadron to which we were attached, consisting, besides the Stevens, of the Galena, Monitor, Aroos took, and Port Royal, worked
Kingsland Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
or could not have done better. The barrier is such that vessels of the enemy, if they have any, cannot possibly pass out; ours cannot pass in. I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, John Rodgers, Commander U. S. Navy. Lieut. Wm. N. Jeffers's report. U. S. Iron-clad steamer Monitor, James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I submit the following report of the movements of this vessel during the action of yesterday: Shortly after weighing anchor from our position near Kingsland Creek a sharp fire of musketry was commenced from both banks on all the ships. At half-past 7 I discovered an extensive fortification on an elevation of about two hundred feet, with several smaller batteries, all apparently mounting guns of the heaviest calibre; at the foot of the bluff in the river an obstruction formed of sunken steamers and vessels, secured with chains, and the shallow water, piled across the river. The Galena having anchored at about one thousand yards from the fort
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Doc. 37.-the battle on James River, Va. Commander Rodgers's report. United States steamer Galena, off City point, James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that this vessel, the Aroostook, the Monitor, and Port Royal, with the Naugatuck, moved up the river yesterday, getting aground several times, bu's Bluff, (about five miles above Day's Point,) we saw the rebel steamers Yorktown and Jamestown, but they ran from us, ascending the river. When we arrived at City Point we found the storehouses there, containing tobacco, etc., in flames, and nearly consumed. On the evening of the fourteenth inst., we arrived about ten miles un cannot be fitted without considerable delay, and I have therefore offered the Flag-Officer to return as I am, as Commodore Rodgers told me when I left him at City Point that the vessel, even in her present condition, could be of great service to him. . . . Sincerely yours, D. C. Constable. Captain John Faunce. Rebel off
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Doc. 37.-the battle on James River, Va. Commander Rodgers's report. United States steamer Galena, off City point, James River, May James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that this vessel, the Aroostook, the Monitor, and Port Royal, with the Naugatuck, moved up the r. Wm. N. Jeffers's report. U. S. Iron-clad steamer Monitor, James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I submit the following report of the move attached, had a four hours fight with a strong rebel battery on James River, eight miles below Richmond. During the fight our one hundred-ptly I have tendered my vessel to the Flag-Officer to again go up James River in her present condition, relying upon my broadside rifle-guns f obstructions, etc., etc. The Commodore, before I left him up James River, told me that even in my present state I could be of great servie Galena, Monitor, Aroos took, and Port Royal, worked our way up James River, and at a battery at a place called Harding's Bluff, (about five
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Doc. 37.-the battle on James River, Va. Commander Rodgers's report. United States steamer Galena, off City point, James River, May 16, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that this vessel, the Aroostook, the Monitor, and Port Royal, with the Naugatuck, moved up the river yesterday, getting aground several times, butn Gieson's report. The following is the report of Assistant Surgeon Van Gieson, of the Galena, giving an account of the killed and wounded in the action: United States Steamer Galena.--Killed: Thomas Ready, Captain foretop; James H. Weber, third-class boy; Michael Many, landsman; Martin Milbery, do.; John Smith, ordinary seam of right leg. Naugatuck.--James Wilson, musket-shot, not serious; Peter Dixon, not seriously. Lieutenant Constable's letters: letter to his mother. United States gunboat E. A. Stevens, Hampton roads, May 18. my dear mother: I have to thank God for a life preserved under circumstances where it even now seems impossibl
S. R. Mallory (search for this): chapter 37
. . . . I am anxious to rejoin the James River squadron at once, although it has been decided that another gun cannot be fitted without considerable delay, and I have therefore offered the Flag-Officer to return as I am, as Commodore Rodgers told me when I left him at City Point that the vessel, even in her present condition, could be of great service to him. . . . Sincerely yours, D. C. Constable. Captain John Faunce. Rebel official report. Drury's Bluff, May 15, 1862. Hon. S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy: sir: The enemy came up the river at half-past 6 A. M., the Galena ahead, the Monitor and a small iron steamer, a side-wheel and a smaller gunboat following in succession. When about four hundred yards from our obstructions our batteries opened fire upon the Monitor and Galena. They did not reply until the Galena had placed herself directly athwart the channel. After which she and the Monitor opened a brisk fire, the other vessels keeping under way, and a
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