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Tar River (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
oops taken by the fleet were the Fifth Massachusetts, five companies of the Twenty-third Massachusetts, eight of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, six of the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts, eight of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts, Fifth Rhode Island, eight companies of the Twenty-fifth New-Jersey, and the Tenth Connecticut. The fleet sailed at nine o'clock on the morning of the thirtieth October, and passing down the river Neuse into Pamlico Sound, arrived at Washington, at the entrance of Tar River, on the afternoon of the thirty-first, after a pleasant passage. Here a marine battery of four pieces were added to the artillery force. The departure of the army from Washington was delayed twenty-four hours by the non-arrival of the force marching overland, and it was not until the morning of November second that the whole expedition set out for the interior, in three brigades, under Colonels Amory, Stevenson and Lee. The Fifth Massachusetts was in Col. Lee's brigade, the Forty-four
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
f our troops, when they were tied to the rear of baggage-wagons, and compelled to follow the retreating rebels. On the ninth we marched eighteen miles from Williamston to within four miles of Plymouth, on the Roanoke River, at the head of Albemarle Sound. On the tenth our camp was moved to within one mile of Plymouth, and on the eleventh the troops commenced embarking for Newbern, via Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and the river Neuse, arriving at this place late last evening. The results Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and the river Neuse, arriving at this place late last evening. The results of the expedition are the opening of the Roanoke River for gunboats beyond Hamilton; an important diversion in favor of other Federal projects, by compelling the enemy to concentrate troops at Tarboro; the capture of several prisoners, a large number of horses and supplies; and the release from bondage of several hundred slaves, whose masters ran away from them at our approach, leaving the dusky contrabands to welcome us with fervent gratitude, and to join us at our departure. Too much prais
Pamlico Sound (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
he Twenty-seventh Massachusetts, Fifth Rhode Island, eight companies of the Twenty-fifth New-Jersey, and the Tenth Connecticut. The fleet sailed at nine o'clock on the morning of the thirtieth October, and passing down the river Neuse into Pamlico Sound, arrived at Washington, at the entrance of Tar River, on the afternoon of the thirty-first, after a pleasant passage. Here a marine battery of four pieces were added to the artillery force. The departure of the army from Washington was deiamston to within four miles of Plymouth, on the Roanoke River, at the head of Albemarle Sound. On the tenth our camp was moved to within one mile of Plymouth, and on the eleventh the troops commenced embarking for Newbern, via Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and the river Neuse, arriving at this place late last evening. The results of the expedition are the opening of the Roanoke River for gunboats beyond Hamilton; an important diversion in favor of other Federal projects, by compelling the en
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 46
vices on this march, and in the affair at Little Creek and Rawls's Mills, as well as previous services at the battles of Roanoke and Newbern, be promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General, to date from November third, 1862. I have the honor to be, v front of the town, ready to cooperate with the army in the reduction of a strong rebel fort at Rainbow Bluff, oh the Roanoke River, near Hamilton, twelve miles farther on. Guards were stationed at the tenanted houses, and our troops were quartered etreating rebels. On the ninth we marched eighteen miles from Williamston to within four miles of Plymouth, on the Roanoke River, at the head of Albemarle Sound. On the tenth our camp was moved to within one mile of Plymouth, and on the eleventhnd the river Neuse, arriving at this place late last evening. The results of the expedition are the opening of the Roanoke River for gunboats beyond Hamilton; an important diversion in favor of other Federal projects, by compelling the enemy to c
Hamilton, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
fortifications at Rainbow Banks, three miles below Hamilton, and then pushed on to Hamilton. There we expecteHamilton. There we expected to find some iron-clad boats said to be in the process of construction at Hamilton, but discovered nothing oHamilton, but discovered nothing of the kind. On the sixth, we left Hamilton, in pursuit of the enemy toward Tarboro, and encamped on the same . During the engagement at Rawls's Mills and at Hamilton, we captured five prisoners, who were paroled at W fort at Rainbow Bluff, oh the Roanoke River, near Hamilton, twelve miles farther on. Guards were stationed at retreating foe. This being done, the army entered Hamilton, finding the town almost entirely deserted, the red accept Federal protection. Three miles beyond Hamilton our army encamped on a large plantation owned by am on the roads, our army commenced retiring toward Hamilton, which we reached at five P. M. on the sixth, aftee opening of the Roanoke River for gunboats beyond Hamilton; an important diversion in favor of other Federal
Tarboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
d. On the sixth, we left Hamilton, in pursuit of the enemy toward Tarboro, and encamped on the same night within ten miles of that place. It was my intention to pursue the enemy toward Tarboro, but the exhausted condition of my men, most of whom had been sick during the last two guard came up with the enemy's cavalry, when within seven miles of Tarboro, and a small force of cavalry and infantry were stationed for the ng another and more circuitous route, marched within four miles of Tarboro, with the view of capturing three rebel regiments known to have beted the confederates fifteen thousand to twenty thousand strong at Tarboro. They had skirmished with the enemy's advanced guard during the nFederal projects, by compelling the enemy to concentrate troops at Tarboro; the capture of several prisoners, a large number of horses and suourth were also engaged in the night scouting and skirmishing near Tarboro. The regiment acquitted itself creditably in the actions at Old F
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 46
arched from this point across the country to Washington; the balance of my forces, including the Sec, were embarked on transports, and landed at Washington, where they were joined by Colonel Amory's cd, all the forces, including artillery, left Washington, under my command, for Williamston. On the e place; but upon hearing of my advance from Washington, and seeing the danger of their capture, thes of artillery, had already left by land for Washington, N. C. and two gunboats and seven transportse river Neuse into Pamlico Sound, arrived at Washington, at the entrance of Tar River, on the afternas the army proceeded. When nine miles from Washington a small rebel camp was found, from which theonnections, at that place. But our delay at Washington had given the enemy time to concentrate his men, and after leaving fifty in garrison at Washington, returned to Plymouth with less than four hue Fifth, they having marched from Newbern to Washington while our regiment was proceeding to the sam[1 more...]
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
ortunity to rest. At daylight the next day, the tenth instant, we started for Plymouth, where we arrived that night. The following day the troops were all reembarket wounded. The expedition was instrumental in saving the town and forces at Plymouth from destruction and capture, as I found upon my arrival at the place that then the ninth we marched eighteen miles from Williamston to within four miles of Plymouth, on the Roanoke River, at the head of Albemarle Sound. On the tenth our camp was moved to within one mile of Plymouth, and on the eleventh the troops commenced embarking for Newbern, via Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and the river Neuse, arrividious a campaign, and you will not be surprised to learn that the army reached Plymouth on its return with greatly diminished numbers. As a specimen of the whole, (fixty-eight men, and after leaving fifty in garrison at Washington, returned to Plymouth with less than four hundred and seventy-five men. The Forty-fourth Massachu
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
tremely warm, and our progress was necessarily slow, many of the troops, both of the old and new regiments, falling out of the ranks from exhaustion. At four P. M., when within six miles of Williamston, cannonading and musket-firing was heard in the advance, and it was soon ascertained that a body of seven hundred rebels, with two artillery pieces, had made a stand in a very commanding position on the opposite bank of a small creek, at a place called Old Ford. The marine battery and the New-York battery opened upon them, and the Forty-fourth Massachusetts, supported by the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, charged across the stream, and the rebel position was speedily carried, the marine battery losing one man killed, James King, of Chicago; and the Forty-fourth Massachusetts two men, Charles Morse and----Rollins. The rebel loss could not be ascertained, as they removed all the bodies of their dead except one. The rebels retreated to rifle-pits at Rawls's Mills, one mile distant, fr
Rand (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 46
Doc. 42.-General Foster's expedition through eastern North-Carolina. General Foster's official report. headquarters Department of North-Carolina, Carolina, Newbern, Nov. 12, 1862. Major-Gen. Halleck, General-in-Chief, U. S.A.: General: I have the honor to report that, agreeable to my letter of the thirtieth ultimo, informing you of my intention to make an expedition through the eastern counties of this State, and stating the object of the move, I left this post on the thirty-first ultimo, and have just arrived here on my return. I am happy to inform you that although the original plan for the capture of the three regiments foraging in that section was, owing to the condition of the roads, frustrated, the expedition will be of great service to our cause in this department. The First brigade, under command of Colonel T. J. C. Amory, together with the artillery, cavalry and wagon-train, were marched from this point across the country to Washington; the balance of my fo
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