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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore).

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McClellan (search for this): chapter 1
ent of the United States it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army ofd myself should proceed to the headquarters of General McClellan, then at Rectortown, when the order relieving General McClellan was delivered to him, after which it was decided that the orders which had already been issued by General McClellan, directing the movements of the army for concentration near Warrenton, with a view to acns contained in a letter from the President to General McClellan, a copy of which was sent to me under cover ofewith a copy of a letter from the President to General McClellan, dated the thirteenth of last month. I wish yal-in-Chief. On the ninth day of November, General McClellan issued an order relinquishing the command of t November, from Captain Duane, of the Staff of General McClellan, to move from Berlin to Washington with his trp the overland pontoon train, and knowing that General McClellan had been relieved after the order had been iss
e attack would be successful. I directed him to make the assault. Some time afterward General Hooker came to me in person with the same statement. I reiterated my order, which he then proceeded to obey. The afternoon was now well advanced. General Franklin before this had been positively ordered to attack with his whole force, and I hoped before sundown to have broken through the enemy's line. This order was not carried out. At four P. M. General Humphreys was directed to attack, General Sykes' division moving in support of Humphreys' right. All these men fought with determined courage, but without success. General Humphreys was conspicuous for his gallantry throughout the action. Our forces had been repulsed at all points, and it was necessary to look upon the day's work as a failure. It is not pleasant to dwell upon these results even at this distance of time, and I have, therefore, been thus brief in my statement of them. From the night of the thirteenth until the
ternoon of the nineteenth. On this day it commenced raining, in consequence of which the roads became very bad. Great exertions were made by Colonel S. to push his train forward, but, before his arrival at the Occoquan, he decided to raft his boats when he reached that river and have them towed to Belle Plain, for which purpose he sent an officer back for a steamer to meet him at the mouth of the river. The animals were sent overland. He arrived at Belle Plain with his pontoons on the twenty-fourth, and by the night of the twenty-fifth he was encamped near general headquarters. By this time the enemy had concentrated a large force on the opposite side of the river, so that it became necessary to make arrangements to cross in the face of a vigilant and formidable force. These arrangements were not completed until about the tenth of December. In the meantime the troops were stationed with a view to accumulating supplies and getting in readiness for the movement. I omitted to
R. E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1
is course, by showing that none of these fords are reliable for the passage of large bodies of troops without the use of temporary bridges ; and the pontoons did not arrive until the twenty-fifth. It is possible that the cavalry with some light infantry could have crossed both rivers and moved down to Fredericksburg, on the south side, but before the pontoons arrived, enabling the entire army to cross; this force would have been called on to resist an attack from the greater portion of General Lee's army. General Sumner, on arriving at Falmouth on the seventeenth, suggested crossing a portion of his force over the fords at that place with a view to taking Fredericksburg; but from information in my possession as to the condition of the ford, I decided that it was impracticable to cross large bodies of troops at that place. It was afterward ascertained that they could not have crossed. On my arrival at Falmouth on the seventeenth, I despatched to General Halleck's Chief of Sta
al-in-Chief. This despatch was received at my headquarters at Warrenton at eleven o'clock on the morning of the fourteenth instant, and I at once issued orders for the different commands to move in accordance with the above-mentioned plan. Theication with Washington should be interrupted, I directed Lieutenant Comstock, my Chief-Engineer, on the morning of the fourteenth, to ask General Woodbury, by telegraph, if the pontoons were ready to move. Not receiving an immediate reply, I directext morning, the fourteenth. Colonel Spaulding called upon General Woodbury at the hour appointed on the morning of the fourteenth, and was requested by the General to wait until he called upon General Halleck. In about one hour General Woodbury ret firing was indulged in in the meantime. I directed preparations to be made for another attack on the morning of the fourteenth, but, for reasons not necessary to mention here, I countermanded the order. On the night of the fifteenth I decided
near general headquarters. By this time the enemy had concentrated a large force on the opposite side of the river, so that it became necessary to make arrangements to cross in the face of a vigilant and formidable force. These arrangements were not completed until about the tenth of December. In the meantime the troops were stationed with a view to accumulating supplies and getting in readiness for the movement. I omitted to say that on the nineteenth instant I received through Colonel Richmond, my Assistant Adjutant-General, a communication from General Hooker, suggesting the crossing of a force at the fords above Falmouth. This letter appears in his (General Hooker's) report. I determined to make preparations to cross the river at Snicker's Neck, about fourteen miles below Fredericksburg, and if the movements of the enemy favored the crossing at that point, to avail myself of such preparations; otherwise, to adopt such a course as his movements rendered necessary. The
December 13th (search for this): chapter 1
ders already issued were to be superseded by new ones. It was after midnight when I returned from visiting the different commands, and before daylight of the thirteenth I prepared the following orders: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, December 13--5:55 A. M. Major-General Franklin, commanding Left Grand Division, Army of the Potomac: General Hardie will carry this despatch to you, and remain with you during the day. The General commanding directs that you keep your command in positif my staff. It reached him at 7:30 A. M. I cannot possibly give a more intelligent account of the movements of General Franklin's command that day, than by copying into this report the despatches of General Hardie, which are as follows: December 13, 7:40 A. M. General Meade's division is to make the movement from our left, but it is just reported that the enemy's skirmishers are advancing, indicating an attack upon our position on the left. 9 A. M. General Meade just moved out; Do
E. D. Townsend (search for this): chapter 1
eventh day of November, 1862, General Buckingham arrived at my headquarters at Orleans, Virginia, with the following order and letter: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5, 1862. General Orders No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. war Department, Washington City, November 5, 1862. Major-General Burnside. Commanding, etc.: General: Immediately on assuming command of the Army of the Potomac, you will report the position of your troops and what you purpose doing with them. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. After some consultation, it was decided that General Buckingham and myself should proceed to the headquarters of General McClell
, and the grand divisions of Generals Franklin and Hooker, together with the cavalry, started on the sixteenth. General Sumner's advance reached Falmouth on the seventeenth. General Franklin concentrated his command at Stafford Court-House, and General Hooker his in the vicinity of Hartwood. The cavalry was ill the rear and covross; this force would have been called on to resist an attack from the greater portion of General Lee's army. General Sumner, on arriving at Falmouth on the seventeenth, suggested crossing a portion of his force over the fords at that place with a view to taking Fredericksburg; but from information in my possession as to the coimpracticable to cross large bodies of troops at that place. It was afterward ascertained that they could not have crossed. On my arrival at Falmouth on the seventeenth, I despatched to General Halleck's Chief of Staff a report which explained the movements of troops up to that date, and who stated the fact of the non-arrival o
Doubleday (search for this): chapter 1
tack upon our position on the left. 9 A. M. General Meade just moved out; Doubleday supports him; Meade's skirmishers, however, engaged at once with enemy's skire's right. Men fight well, driving the enemy. Meade has suffered severely. Doubleday to Meade's left — not engaged. 2:15 P. M. Gibbon and Meade driven back frfear another advance on the enemy on our left cannot be made this afternoon. Doubleday's division will replace Meade's as soon as it can be collected, and, if it bef the command, General Meade's, led the attack; at nine o'clock it moved with Doubleday's division in support; at eleven o'clock it had been moved a half mile, and heman for a correct understanding of the movement of these two divisions. General Doubleday's division performed good service in resisting the attack of the enemy onort of General Reynolds will give more in detail the work of General Meade's, Doubleday's, and Gibbon's troops. The Sixth corps, the strongest and one of the most
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