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[117] It is, then, a monstrous thing that a man who was of the race of the Eumolpidae,1 born of honorable ancestors and a citizen of Athens, should be punished for having transgressed one of your established customs; and the pleadings of his relatives and friends did not save him, nor the public services which he and his ancestors had rendered to the city; no, nor yet his office of hierophant; but you punished him, because he was judged to be guilty;—and this Neaera, who has committed acts of sacrilege against this same god, and has transgressed the laws, shall you not punish her—her and her daughter?

1 The Eumolpidae were descendants of the legendary Eumolpus. Certain sacred functions connected with the worship of Demeter and Dionysus were theirs by ancestral right; for instance, the Hierophant had always to be a Eumolpid, as therefore Archias was.

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