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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 185 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 172 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 156 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 147 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 114 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 102 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for John C. Breckinridge or search for John C. Breckinridge in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
ken possession of Cold Harbor on the 31st, and had been promptly followed up by two corps of infantry. The Sixth and Eighteenth corps reached Cold Harbor on the 1st of June.--editors. Longstreet's and a part of Hill's corps, with Hoke's and Breckinridge's divisions, Breckinridge came from the Valley and joined Lee's army at the North Anna [Hanover Junction] with about 2700 men. Hoke had just arrived from Petersburg. Pickett's division, which had been serving in the Department of North CarBreckinridge came from the Valley and joined Lee's army at the North Anna [Hanover Junction] with about 2700 men. Hoke had just arrived from Petersburg. Pickett's division, which had been serving in the Department of North Carolina, had also joined its corps at the North Anna.--E. M. L. were thrown across their front. The fighting began on the Cold Harbor line, late in the afternoon of the 1st of June, by a heavy attack upon the divisions of Hoke and Kershaw. Clingman's brigade on Hoke's left gave way, and Wofford's on Kershaw's right, being turned, was also forced back; but the further progress of the attack was checked and the line partly restored before night. By the morning of the 2d of June the opposing lines
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
arrison and armament captured. The gun-boat Smithfield was sunk, and the Miami disabled. The army sent to operate against Richmond having hermetically sealed itself up at Bermuda Hundred, the enemy was enabled to bring the most, if not all, the reenforcements brought from the South by Beauregard against the Army of the Potomac. In addition to this reenforeement, a very considerable one, probably not less than fifteen thousand men, was obtained by calling in the scattered troops under Breckinridge from the western part of Virginia. The position of Bermuda Hundred was as easy to defend as it was difficult to operate from against the enemy. I determined, therefore, to bring from it all available forces, leaving enough only to secure what had been gained; and accordingly, on the 22d, I directed that they be sent forward, under command of Major-General W. F. Smith, to join the Army of the Potomac. On the 24th of May the Ninth Army Corps, commanded by Major-General A. E. Burnside
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
s (see p. 183), with the exception of some transfers and consolidations of brigades (notably those of Ed. Johnson's division, which had been badly shattered at Spotsylvania) and the accession of Hoke's old brigade and the divisions of Pickett, Breckinridge, and Hoke. Insufficient data, however, prevent the preparation of a full list of the troops and commanders. For the same reason the editors have also found it impossible to give the strength of the army. It is nowhere authoritatively stated. Upon this subject Colonel Walter H. Taylor ( Four years with General Lee, p. 136) remarks: The only reenforcements received by General Lee were as follows: Near Hanover Junction he was joined by a small force under General Breckinridge, . . . 2200 strong, and Pickett's division of Longstreet's corps, which had been on detached duty in North Carolina. Hoke's brigade of Early's division, 1200 strong, which had been on detached duty at the Junction, here also rejoined its division; and at Cold
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cold Harbor. (search)
ke's division formed the Confederate right, near New Cold Harbor, and Anderson's corps (Longstreet's) extended the line to a point opposite Beulah Church. During the afternoon W. F. Smith's corps arrived on the right of Wright, extending the Union line to Beulah Church. At 6 o'clock Smith and Wright drove the enemy through the woods along the road to New Cold Harbor and intrenched a new line. Warren was north of Smith. On June 2d Hancock formed on the left of Wright. Hill's corps and Breckinridge's division took position opposite, extending the Confederate line to the Chickahominy. Burnside, May 30th to June 1st, occupied lines facing south and west, above Sydnor's sawmill; June 2d he withdrew to Warren's right. Ewell's position throughout was on the Confederate left. Hancock's line, connecting with Wright's left, extended obliquely to the left and rear. A movement upon his part to the front must necessarily take him off obliquely from the line of advance of the center. The sa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
ations, and one hundred rounds of ammunition were carried by each trooper. While moving along the north side of the river, Sheridan heard that the infantry of Breckinridge was en route to Gordonsville, and that the cavalry of Hampton and Fitz Lee were in pursuit of Sheridan's column, and straining every nerve to reach the objectihat Ewell's corps was on its way to Lynchburg; and that Map of the battle of Trevilian Station. For Sheridan's route during the raid, see map, P. 190. Breckinridge was at Gordonsville. This information was false. It is now known that Breckinridge had moved on Lynchburg.--T. F. R. He concluded, therefore, to return. DBreckinridge had moved on Lynchburg.--T. F. R. He concluded, therefore, to return. During the night of the 12th the command moved back, recrossed the North Anna at Carpenter's Ford, unsaddled the horses and turned them out to graze; the poor animals had been without food for two days. The enemy came in sight but once during the entire march to West Point on the York River, from which place the wounded were sent b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
ted by the bloody repulses of their repeated attacks on our lines. Lee had drawn Pickett and Breckinridge to him. But in the midst of the operations on the North Anna he succumbed to sickness, againsles in length, and a complete and bloody repulse at all points, except at one weak salient on Breckinridge's line, which the brave assailants occupied A call for reenforcements. for a short time o in their great commander. After the battle of Cold Harbor, Lee felt strong enough to send Breckinridge toward the valley to meet Hunter's expedition, and on the 13th to detach Early with the SeconCorps, now numbering some eight thousand muskets and twenty-four pieces of artillery, to join Breckinridge; he also restored Hoke's division to Beauregard. When Grant set out for the James, Lee throf the salient against Hancock and Wright and Warren. Besides this, Lee had already detached Breckinridge's division and Early's corps to meet Hunter at Lynchburg. And, after all, the result showed
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., John Morgan in 1864. (search)
stroyed all of his captured stores and paroled the prisoners he had taken, and marching instantly back to Virginia, via Flemings-burg and West Liberty, and thence through the mountains, reached Abingdon, Va., June 20th. Disastrous as this raid was, in some respects, it accomplished its purpose, and delayed the apprehended incursion into south-western Virginia for several months, and until measures were concerted to frustrate it. General S. G. Burbridge reported officially that the losses in his command during these operations amounted to 53 killed, 156 wounded, and 205 captured or missing = 414.--editors. From this period until the date of his death, September 4th, 1864, General Morgan was engaged in no military operation of consequence. He was killed at Greenville while advancing to attack Gillem at Bull's Gap in Tennessee, with the intention, if successful, of marching into middle Tennessee. He was succeeded in the command of the department by General John C. Breckinridge.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
n repulsed, the same troops now charged with resistless force, capturing fourteen guns and one thousand prisoners. Steedman's colored brigades also rallied and brought in their share of prisoners and other spoils of war. Everywhere the success was complete. Foremost among the rejoicing victors was General Steedman, under whose command were the colored troops. Steedman had been a life-long Democrat and was one of the delegates, in 1860, to the Charleston convention, at which ultimately Breckinridge was nominated for President. As he rode over the field, immediately after the rout of the enemy, he asked, with a grim smile, as he pointed to the fleeing hosts, I wonder what my Democratic friends over there would think of me if they knew I was fighting them with nigger troops? I have not space to tell the story of the pursuit, which only ended, ten days later, at the Tennessee River. About a month before, General Hood had triumphantly begun his northward movement. Now, in his disa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
y two days on the road, so that when Burbridge arrived there about an equal force confronted him, commanded by General John C. Breckinridge. On October 2d Burbridge attacked the forces at the salt-works. A battalion of Virginia Reserves (the 13th),y. The department had been drained of most of its troops by increasing demands from the armies east and west, so that Breckinridge found himself in command of only about 1000 or 1500 men in a department large enough to require an army corps to defenAbingdon, and passing by the salt-works advanced upon Wytheville and the lead-mines. In hopes of arresting his course Breckinridge moved from the salt-works to Marion, on the railroad, where he intercepted Stoneman on Sunday, the 18th of December, aorks, now without defenders, except a few militia and teamsters, and destroyed as much of the works as possible before Breckinridge's forces could reach there. Having accomplished this long-desired object, the Federal forces withdrew across the moun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
of May 15th. On Thursday, the 12th, General Breckinridge telegraphed me his arrival at Staunton oadside. I was immediately accosted by General Breckinridge. He informed me that his troops would hat point before sunrise. About daylight Breckinridge's troops cameup,weary, wet, and muddy, and states in his official report that when General Breckinridge was expecting to be attacked he posted alry and our flank fire was observed by General Breckinridge, who immediately pushed forward his infpossible that night. If Sigel had beaten Breckinridge on the 15th of May General Lee could not haearing of our defeat General Lee again sent Breckinridge to our aid. He brought but few troops, and is progress in the valley being impossible, Breckinridge directed Brigadier-General McCausland to tasible, and report his daily progress, while Breckinridge moved all the rest of his troops directly t, under Lieutenant-General Jubal A. Early. Breckinridge was already there with his small force from[15 more...]
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