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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure).

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December 3rd (search for this): chapter 2
supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sithird payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was hastily commissioned, officered, manned, supplied, and left New York for Hampton Roads three days after, on the 6th of March. Intense anxiety was naturally felt by the officials in the
December 17th (search for this): chapter 2
s stated by General Butler, payments were promptly made by the Navy Department to Mr. Griswold and his associates, as rapidly, at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 2
y Department to Mr. Griswold and his associates, as rapidly, at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was hastily commissioned, officered, manned, supplied, and left New Yo
December 2nd (search for this): chapter 2
nd paying the entire expense out of his own funds, as stated by General Butler, payments were promptly made by the Navy Department to Mr. Griswold and his associates, as rapidly, at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of Marc
January 4th (search for this): chapter 2
ent to Mr. Griswold and his associates, as rapidly, at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was hastily commissioned, officered, manned, supplied, and left New York for Ham
February 6th (search for this): chapter 2
at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was hastily commissioned, officered, manned, supplied, and left New York for Hampton Roads three days after, on the 6th of March.
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 2
The First iron-clad Monitor. Hon. Gideon Welles. The Navy of the United States, at the commencement of Mr. Lincoln's administration, was feeble, and in no condition for belligerent operations. Most of the vessels in commission were on foreign service; only three or four, and they of an inferior class, were available for act the little Monitor had taken care of her. Oh! said the President, pointing to the boats which lined the shore, that is Stanton's navy; that is the squadron that Welles would have nothing to do with, and about which he and Stanton had the dispute. It was finally decided, I believe, that the War Department might have a fleet of its own to fight the Merrimac, and there it is. We were all a little scared at that time. Mr. Welles felt bad enough, but was not enough scared to listen to Stanton's scheme of blockading the river; said the fleet of boats would be useless, and, if used, worse than useless. Stanton, who was a little disconcerted by the Presiden
Henry A. Wise (search for this): chapter 2
bits and opinions was the fate of the Department at every step which was taken in the extraordinary exigencies of the war, and the voyage and fighting qualities of the Monitor were now to be proved. Full confidence was felt in her commander, Worden — who had just returned from a captivity of several months at Montgomery-his subordinates, and the small but selected and gallant crew who were embarked in this experiment. So great was the interest that the Assistant Secretary, Mr. Fox, Lieutenant Wise, of the Ordnance Bureau, and some members of my family, left Washington on Saturday, the 8th of March, for Fortress Monroe, to meet and greet the Monitor on her arrival. Doubts were entertained and freely expressed whether the battery could perform the voyage. On Sunday morning, the 9th of March, while at the Navy Department, examining the dispatches received, Mr. Watson, Assistant Secretary of War, hastily entered with a telegram from General Wool, at Fortress Monroe, stating that
October 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 2
ned by the limit of twenty-five days, I immediately followed, and arrived in Washington almost as soon as Mr. Bushnell with the model. Seventeen plans for armored vessels were submitted, and propositions made, by different parties, for their construction. Three of them received a favorable report, among them Ericsson's turret vessel, with guns of immense calibre, which, when built, was called, by his request, the Monitor. A contract for this vessel was made and signed on the fourth of October, 1861. It was stipulated that she should be complete in all her parts and appurtenances; should have a speed of eight knots per hour, with security or successful working of the turret and guns, with safety to the vessel and the men in the turrets, and that said vessel and equipments, in all respects, shall be completed and ready for sea in one hundred days from the date of this indenture. It was agreed by the Navy Department, that the Government should pay therefor $275,000, in payments
G. V. Fox (search for this): chapter 2
omery-his subordinates, and the small but selected and gallant crew who were embarked in this experiment. So great was the interest that the Assistant Secretary, Mr. Fox, Lieutenant Wise, of the Ordnance Bureau, and some members of my family, left Washington on Saturday, the 8th of March, for Fortress Monroe, to meet and greet the line that had been completed from Fortress Monroe only the preceding evening, but as we now had telegraphic communication, I momentarily expected a dispatch from Mr. Fox, or the senior naval officer on the station. Mr. Stanton, impulsive, and always a sensationalist, was terribly excited, walked the room in great agitation, an in command of the Navy Yard, to consult with. To this I assented, but objected to any obstructions to navigation. At a late hour, I received a telegram from Mr. Fox, stating that the Monitor had reached Hampton Roads a little before midnight of the 8th, and had encountered and driven off the Merrimac. The submerged telegraph
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