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New York of the steamer Jura, we have the following additional items of foreign news: Great Britain. The excitement in relation to the Trent affair continued unabated. The London Times city article says that the stock market on the 4th inst. was more heavy and unsettled than at any period since the commencement of the difficulty. At the close, however, there was a slight rally in the fund. The strength of the American navy was being canvassed in England. The London Times Temps announces that Napoleon has tendered his services to the British government. The Paris Temps is also informed that, in case the American Government refuses to give satisfaction, the English Cabinet has resolved to recall Lord Lyons from Washington, recognize the Southern Confederacy, and raise the blockade of the Southern ports. England would not then declare war, but leave it to the United States to do as they please. The Paris Bourse, on the 4th inst., was firm at 69f. 55
quadrons a wide berth, and concentrate their efforts on single ships. France. The speculations from France in regard to the English-American difficulty are contradictory. The Paris correspondent of the Daily News learns that when Mr. Slidell was taking leave of his wife on board the Trent, he placed his dispatches in her hand, told her to go to her cabin, sit at the porthole, and that if an attempt was made to take the box from her, to drop it into the sea. Mrs. Slidell obeyed hisMrs. Slidell obeyed his orders, was not molested, and took the dispatches safely to England. The Paris Patric learns that the San Jacinto in November last searched a French vessels. These facts, says the Patric, are of some importance, as proving that the Cabinet at Washington fancies that it has the power to exercise the right of search to its full extent. Some writers say that France will remain a quiet spectator of passing events. Others state that there is a disposition to employ the army and navy in c
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 11
Additional foreign news by the Jura. By the arrival at New York of the steamer Jura, we have the following additional items of foreign news: Great Britain. The excitement in relation to the Trent affair continued unabated. The London Times city article says that the stock market on the 4th inst. was more heavy and unsettled than at any period since the commencement of the difficulty. At the close, however, there was a slight rally in the fund. The strength of the American navy was being canvassed in England. The London Times says, that although the Federal navy scarcely presents a dozen worthy antagonists, it would be imprudent in the extreme to despite the power of the Americans at sea. We have done this once, and paid the cost of our thoughtlessness. The Americans will do little, but what little they do they will do well. They will give our heavy squadrons a wide berth, and concentrate their efforts on single ships. France. The speculations f
United States (United States) (search for this): article 11
a quiet spectator of passing events. Others state that there is a disposition to employ the army and navy in case of war. The preponderating feeling, however, is represented to be favorable to a reconciliation between England and America. It was reported that the French Minister at Washington had reported to his government a refusal on the part of the Cabinet at Washington to deliver up dispatches addressed from Paris to the French Consuls at Charleston and New Orleans. The Paris Temps announces that Napoleon has tendered his services to the British government. The Paris Temps is also informed that, in case the American Government refuses to give satisfaction, the English Cabinet has resolved to recall Lord Lyons from Washington, recognize the Southern Confederacy, and raise the blockade of the Southern ports. England would not then declare war, but leave it to the United States to do as they please. The Paris Bourse, on the 4th inst., was firm at 69f. 55
France (France) (search for this): article 11
s will do little, but what little they do they will do well. They will give our heavy squadrons a wide berth, and concentrate their efforts on single ships. France. The speculations from France in regard to the English-American difficulty are contradictory. The Paris correspondent of the Daily News learns that when France in regard to the English-American difficulty are contradictory. The Paris correspondent of the Daily News learns that when Mr. Slidell was taking leave of his wife on board the Trent, he placed his dispatches in her hand, told her to go to her cabin, sit at the porthole, and that if an attempt was made to take the box from her, to drop it into the sea. Mrs. Slidell obeyed his orders, was not molested, and took the dispatches safely to England. Thimportance, as proving that the Cabinet at Washington fancies that it has the power to exercise the right of search to its full extent. Some writers say that France will remain a quiet spectator of passing events. Others state that there is a disposition to employ the army and navy in case of war. The preponderating fee
ministering angels" in every good word and work, in behalf of Company "H," of the Seventh Virginia Regiment. Its members are all from Washington City, without relations or friends in the Confederate States to appeal to, in this, their time of need, for articles of clothing which are necessary, nay indispensable, to their health and comfort, at this inclement season, while subject to the exposures of camp life. Among the very first in the field, they were distinguished for their gallant bearing in the battles of the 18th and 21st of July last, and have ever since been anxious for the opportunity of measuring their steel with the foe, and of winning back the honors they left as exiles. Abandoning the endearments of relatives and friends to fight for the independence and rights of the South, and engaged in the defence of our lives and property, they have a right to expect a kindly remembrance; and I trust that this appeal in their behalf will receive a cheering response. Virginian.
ministering angels" in every good word and work, in behalf of Company "H," of the Seventh Virginia Regiment. Its members are all from Washington City, without relations or friends in the Confederate States to appeal to, in this, their time of need, for articles of clothing which are necessary, nay indispensable, to their health and comfort, at this inclement season, while subject to the exposures of camp life. Among the very first in the field, they were distinguished for their gallant bearing in the battles of the 18th and 21st of July last, and have ever since been anxious for the opportunity of measuring their steel with the foe, and of winning back the honors they left as exiles. Abandoning the endearments of relatives and friends to fight for the independence and rights of the South, and engaged in the defence of our lives and property, they have a right to expect a kindly remembrance; and I trust that this appeal in their behalf will receive a cheering response. Virginian.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 12
The Washington Volunteers. Editors of the Dispatch:--I respectfully ask the use of your columns to make an appeal to the ladies of Richmond those "ministering angels" in every good word and work, in behalf of Company "H," of the Seventh Virginia Regiment. Its members are all from Washington City, without relations or friends in the Confederate States to appeal to, in this, their time of need, for articles of clothing which are necessary, nay indispensable, to their health and comfort, at this inclement season, while subject to the exposures of camp life. Among the very first in the field, they were distinguished for their gallant bearing in the battles of the 18th and 21st of July last, and have ever since been anxious for the opportunity of measuring their steel with the foe, and of winning back the honors they left as exiles. Abandoning the endearments of relatives and friends to fight for the independence and rights of the South, and engaged in the defence of our lives and
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 12
The Washington Volunteers. Editors of the Dispatch:--I respectfully ask the use of your columns to make an appeal to the ladies of Richmond those "ministering angels" in every good word and work, in behalf of Company "H," of the Seventh Virginia Regiment. Its members are all from Washington City, without relations or friends in the Confederate States to appeal to, in this, their time of need, for articles of clothing which are necessary, nay indispensable, to their health and comfort, at this inclement season, while subject to the exposures of camp life. Among the very first in the field, they were distinguished for their gallant bearing in the battles of the 18th and 21st of July last, and have ever since been anxious for the opportunity of measuring their steel with the foe, and of winning back the honors they left as exiles. Abandoning the endearments of relatives and friends to fight for the independence and rights of the South, and engaged in the defence of our lives an
e table by two majority. Mr. Wilson, of Indiana, offered a resolution directing the Military Committee to report an additional article of war, prohibiting officers of the army from employing the force under their command to return fugitive slaves to their owners, and providing for the punishment of such officers by dismissal from service. No action was taken on the subject. A resolution that the Committee on the Judiciary be instructed to report a bill so amending the Fugitive Slave Law of 1860 as to forbid the recapture or return of any fugitive from labor without satisfactory proof first being made that the claimant of such fugitive is loyal to the Government, was adopted by a vote of 78 to 89. A bill appropriating $150,000 to complete defences of Washington was passed. News from Gen'l Banks's Army--Gen'l Jackson Shelling Williamsport. Point of Rocks, Dec. 20. --The rebel Jackson left Winchester on Tuesday, with 5,700 men, and 100 boats, each calculated to carry 12 m
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