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fore they knew it. They took to the "laurel," and laid for two days and nights within fifty yards of the Yankee pickets, afraid to draw a long breath or stir a limb. On Tuesday they took to the mountain without guides or roads, and made their way to within eight miles of the Pennsylvania line, where they met a friend, who advised them to stay a day or so at his house, which kind invitation they took advantage of. After resting two or three days, they commenced their march for Petersburg, Hardy county, which they reached Tuesday night, having been three days and two nights on the route, without rest and with little or nothing to eat. You can well imagine what they have endured when I tell you that they had to chew mint, catnip, Tansey, and berries, to prevent starvation; but they are now among friends. They have just left here, pushing for their camp, which they expect to reach at dark. It is at McDowell, Highland county, distance 33 miles, which, with the 30 miles made by them yeste
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], Hospital supplies for the Army of the Northwest. (search)
The Devoted band. We see by our exchanges that recruits for the "Devoted Band" are volunteering. The news of this organization has reached New York, and the abolition Times raves like a maniac about it. The Philadelphia Ledger, once a very decent newspaper, quotes the call for volunteers and expends some wrathful words about Southern atrocities. Federal Outrages. The Romney (Hampshire county, Va.,) Intelligencer, of August 9th, says: The Federal force in this and Hardy county, at this time, is not less than from 4 to 5,000. Many of our citizens have suffered greatly by these Hessians. John T. Peerce, Esq., has had taken off by them 60 head fat cattle, 3 horses, 1 mule, with wagon, and colored servant Harry. Col. E. M. Armstrong, damage done to house and furniture very great — colored servant, Maria, enticed away by them. A W. McDonald, Jr., Esq., furniture and house very much broken up — valuable library nearly all destroyed. Mr. Wm. Barrick estimates his
nts in the State can be increased and legalized, and the State Guard disbanded; and when this shall be done, there will be no difficulty in matching Lincoln soldiers into the State, and re-enacting here the same scenes which have transpired in Maryland and Missouri. More Hessian Cutriges. The Romney (Va.) Intelligencer says: Dr. Sangster, of Moorefield, recently had stolen from his pasture five horses by the Northern vandals who are prowling about in the western section of Hardy county. The residence of Mr. Issue V. Laskeep, on the North Branch of the Potomac, in this county, we understand, was visited a few days ago by a portion of Lincoln's vandals — The scoundrels took what property they desired, and injured the house very seriously. Rev. William Welch, of this county, was arrested as a prisoner at his residence, on yesterday week, by a party of Northern invaders and taken to their headquarters at New Creek Station. After detaining Mr. W. a day or so, he w
Depredations. --The Northerners continue to annoy the citizens of Hardy and Hampshire counties by stealing and destroying their property. The Berryville Conservator hopes they will get entirely rid of the devils shortly.
The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], More Robberies by the Yankees--Confederate successes and Federal Failures. (search)
More Robberies by the Yankees--Confederate successes and Federal Failures. A correspondent of the Romney Intelligencer, writing from Petersburg, Hardy county, Va., under date of Sept. 10th, contains the following interesting items of news: The farmers here have suffered heavily in the loss of stock. Abraham Inskeep, Esq., had stolen from his Alleghany farm 124 head of cattle and 400 sheep. Thomas Williams, Esq., lost 36 fine cattle on Thursday last.--They were about six miles from this point.--All of this valuable stock, to say nothing about horses, was stolen by Union Yankees.--Very few cattle remain in Western Hardy. In my estimate of last week I put it at $20,000; $50,000, or $75,000, are figures more nearly approximating the value of the stock thus far stolen. On Saturday morning last, about 9 o'clock A. M., a regular fight occurred four miles upon Luney's creek. The Unon Yankees, or Vandals, which they truly are, took up a position five miles above here and we
Twenty-five prisoners came down on the Central train yesterday — arrested, we learn, in Hardy county, on suspicion of disloyalty. They are all, we understand, so called "Union men." By whom arrested, or by what authority, or whether by civil or military officers, we have not been informed. Possibly they were taken up by scouting parties sent from Monterey, or from Romney.
it is believed that one or more of the shots took effect. Five other steamers, which had been laying higher up the river, hastened to her relief, but we were unable to learn whether or not they took any part in the action. We have received some information as to the operations of our forces at an important point on the Potomac, which prudence forbids us to mention at this time. The Central train brought down twenty-five "Union" men, who constituted a portion of the "Home Guard" of Hardy county, Virginia. They were captured by the Rockbridge Cavalry on the 21st of August, and have since that time been in prison at Monterey. A more ragged, dirty, graceless set we never saw — good specimens, however, of the "Union" men of the Northwest. One of them declared himself an out-and-out Secessionist, and seemed to think he had been captured through mistake. The prisoners were arraigned before Gen. Winder, and thence transferred to the usual place of refuge. From our army on the
ugh it is believed that one or more of the shots took effect. Five other steamers, which had been -ing higher up the river, hastened to her relief but we were unable to learn whether or not they took any part in the action. We have received some information as to the operations of our forces at an important point on the Potomac, which prudence forbids us to mention at this time. The Central train brought down twenty-five "Union" men, who constituted a portion of the "Home Guard" of Hardy county, Virginia. They were captured by the Rock- Cavalry on the 21st of August, and that time been in prison at Mon- A more ragged, dirty, graceless set we never saw — good specimens, however, of the "Union" men of the Northwest. One of them declared himself an out-and-out Secession and seemed to think he had been captured through mistake. The prisoners were arraigned before Gen. Winder, and thence transferred to the usual place of refuge. From our army on the Potomac there is a thing
effected a landing at Swansborough, or at Cedar Point, near that place. It is only about 15 miles from Cedar Point to the Atlantic Railroad Bridge over Newport river, and it is supposed the Yankees were aiming to get possession of the bridge. We have no doubt they will be promptly met and driven to their ships. Yankee prisoners. The Staunton Spectator, of Friday, says: On Thursday last, twenty four prisoners from the West arrived here by the railroad, and fifteen from Hardy county--the latter being Union men of this State. We understand that some of these latter had been in the Federal army and had been allowed to go home to "seed" their grain. For time, at loast, they will be supported by the Confederate States. Sentiment in Kentucky. The Hickman (Ky.) Courier, of the 12th instant, says: "Thousands of Kentuckians are now ready with their muskets to alone for, and redeem the State. The South has 50.000 majority in the State, and when the quest
Arrival of prisoners. --The Central train yesterday afternoon brought in another lot of Federal prisoners from Western Virginia--Three of them are deserters from the 15th Indiana regiment--an Irishman, a Scotchman, and a Kentuckian. They came into our lines bearing a "flag of truce,"improvised for the occasion from the rear portion of the Irishman's shirt. This Irishman, by the way, is a rollicking sort of a boy, and the novelty of his situation yesterday seemed to afford him much merriment. The other prisoners, fourteen in number, are Union men, or Lincolnites, from Hardy and Pendleton counties.--They came from Staunton in custody of Col. Turk, H. W. Sheffey, Richard Hardy, Philip Trout, and J. M. McCue, of Augusta.
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