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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 29 29 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 43-45 (ed. Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 195 BC or search for 195 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 10 (search)
idates were many and influential, patricians and plebeians,The Licinian-Sextian legislation of 367 B.C. provided that one consul must be a plebeian and both might be. It was customary to elect one from each order. Publius CorneliusB.C. 193 Scipio, the son of Gnaeus, who had recently returned from Spain after performing great deeds,Cf. i. 3 ff. above. and Lucius Quinctius Flamininus, who had commanded the fleet in Greece,Cf. XXXII. xvi. 9, etc. and Gnaeus Manlius Volso;He had been praetor in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 7). these were the patricians; the plebeians now were Gaius Laelius,Laelius was the most intimate friend of Scipio Africanus. He had entered politics late and had been praetor in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxiv. 2). Gnaeus Domitius,He was praetor in 194 B.C. (XXXIV. xlii. 4). Gaius Livius Salinator,Probably, but not certainly, the man mentioned in v. 8 above. and Manius Acilius.He had been plebeian aedile in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. xxv. 2). The circumstantial quality of Livy's details
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 12 (search)
sadors should be sent around to the kings, who should not only sound out their sentiments but should rouse each, by proper inducements, to a Roman war. Damocritus was dispatched to Nabis, NicanderPolybius (XXI. xxxi) gives his name as Mnestas. to Philip, Dicaearchus, the praetor's brother, to Antiochus. To the Spartan tyrant Damocritus pointed out the weakening of the tyranny from the loss of the coast towns;In XXXIV. xxxv, Livy gives the terms of peace between Rome and Nabis in 195 B.C. There the loss of the coast towns is implied rather than expressly stated. thence he had drawn soldiers, thence ships and naval allies; shut up, almost, within his own walls, he saw the Achaeans lording it in the Peloponnesus; he would never have a chance to recover his own if he let pass the one which then existed; there was, moreover, no Roman army in Greece; Gytheum and the other Spartan towns on the coast would not be considered by the Romans an adequate reason why they should aga
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 35 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 33 (search)
arms with justice and almost from necessity. After his arrival there Quinctius in the council began with the origin of the alliance of the Aetolians with the Romans and how often the faith imposed by the treaty had been broken by them, and spoke briefly of the status of the cities about which there was debate: if, nevertheless, they considered that they had any just claim, how much better would it be to send ambassadors to Rome,Recalling the experience of the Aetolian embassy in 195 B.C. (XXXIII. xlix. 8), one cannot blame the Aetolians for not being impressed by this argument. whether they preferred to arbitrate or to appeal to the senate, than for the Roman people to go to warB.C. 192 with Antiochus, the Aetolians being the matchmakers,My translation suggests part but not all of the Latin metaphor. The lanistae were the trainers of the gladiators, who acted also in the capacity of the managers of modern prizefighters. Flamininus means that the Romans and Antiochus are to