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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 40 40 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 8 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 35-37 (ed. Evan T. Sage, PhD professor of latin and head of the department of classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 38-39 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 197 BC or search for 197 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 1 (search)
hen Rome made a treaty with Philip's old enemies, the Aetolians (XXVI. xxiv. 10). Philip's treaty of peace with the Aetolians is dated 205 B.C. by Livy (XXIX. xii. 1), but we may perhaps explain his three years on the assumption that it was not ratified until the next year, Livy's chronology is often confused, as a result of unskilful handling of annalistic sources. The so-called Second Macedonian War, the account of which begins here, was practically ended by the battle of Cynoscephalae in 197 B.C. (XXXIII. vi-x; Polyb. XVIII. xx-xxvii), but lasted diplomatically until 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xxxii). Thereafter Philip pursued a policy of alternating friendship and hostility towards Rome until his death in 179 B.C. begun about ten years before this time, had some time before been laid aside for a period of three years, the Aetolians being the cause of the truce as they had been of the beginning of hostilities. Then later the Romans, being at last unoccupied by any war, as a result of t
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 32 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 32 (search)
By that time it was winter,Livy returns to Polybius (XVIII. i-viii), his authority for the eastern campaign, and the abrupt change of source may explain the harshness of the transitional clause. and while Titus Quinctius, after the capture of Elatia,See xxiv. 7 above. The events now described belong accordingly to the winter of 198-197 B.C., and so antedate the Gallic campaigns just narrated. had his winter quarters distributed through Phocis and Locris, sedition broke out at Opus. One faction called in the Aetolians, who were nearer, the other the Romans. The Aetolians were first to arrive; but the richer factionThe Romans consistently supported the wealthier and more conservative parties in the Greek towns. excluded the Aetolians and, sending a messenger to the Roman commander, held the city until he came. A royal garrison held theB.C. 197 citadel and could not be induced either by the threats of the people of Opus or by the influence of the Roman commander to
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 33 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 19 (search)
in Spain also about the same timeB.C. 197 there was a grave uprising and revolt. When Antiochus, during the preceding summer, had transferred all the cities which are situated in Coele Syria from the power of Ptolemy to his own dominion and had retired to Antioch for the winter, this period was as full of activity as the summer had been. For, when he had assembled huge military and naval forces by exerting all the strength of his kingdom, in the beginning of springThis is the spring of 197 B.C. he sent his two sons, Ardyes and Mithradates, ahead with the army by land. Ordering them to wait for him at Sardis, he set out in person with one hundred decked ships and besides two hundred lighter vessels, schooners and brigs, with the double purpose of trying to win over the cities which had been under the control of Ptolemy along the whole shore of Cilicia, Lycia, and Caria, and of aiding Philip with his army and navy —for that war had not yet been ended.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 10 (search)
At the same time, as Marcus HelviusHelvius had been governor of this province since 197 B.C. (XXXII. xxviii. 2); Claudius succeeded him in 195 B.C. was retiring from Farther Spain, accompanied by a guard of six thousand men furnished by Appius Claudius the praetor, the Celtiberi with a large force fell upon him near the town of Iliturgi. Valerius writes that there were twenty thousand men there, that twelve thousand of them were killed, the town of Iliturgi taken and all the adults put to death. After that Helvius came to the camp of Cato, and, because this region was now safe from the enemy, sent his guard back to Farther Spain and set out for Rome, and by reason of his victory entered the city in an ovation. He deposited in the treasury fourteen thousand seven hundred and thirty-two pounds of uncoined silver, seventeen thousand and twenty-three denarii stamped with the two-horse chariot, and one hundred and nineteen thousand four hundred and forty-nine silver
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 31 (search)
are Romans, men who hold treaties to be the most sacred of divinely-established institutions, and a pledge to be the most sacred of human ties. When I look at myself, I hope that I see myself as one who, as a member of the state, in common with the other Lacedaemonians, has enjoyed a most ancient treatyThe exactness of this statement cannot be verified. There seems to be no record of an earlier treaty, yet in 205 B.C. (XXIX. xii. 14) Nabis is mentioned as an ally. The negotiations of 197 B.C. (XXXII. xxxix. 10-xl. 4) make no mention of such an alliance. with you, and who on his own account and in his own person has recently, during the war with Philip, renewed this friendshipB.C. 195 and alliance. But, you say, I have violated and overturned it because I hold the city of Argos. How shall I defend myself against this charge? By the aid of the facts or by consideration of the time? The facts give me a double defence: first, when the citizens themselves invited me and
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 42 (search)
lius Blasio, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, Sextus Digitius, and Titus Iuventius Thalna. After the elections were over the consul returned to the province. This year the people of Ferentinum tried to secureB.C. 195 a new privilege, to wit, that Latins who had registered as applicants for membership in a Roman colony should be Roman citizens. For such of them as had given in their names were enrolled as colonists of Puteoli, Salernum, and Buxentum,These colonies were founded in 197 B.C. (XXXII. xxix. 3). and since they had on that account conducted themselves as Roman citizens, the senate gave judgment that they were not Roman citizens.The Ferentinates had the status of socii Latini nominis; the other colonies mentioned consisted of cives Romani (xlv. 1 below). The senate's decision establishes the principle that Roman citizenship can not be acquired by Latins by enrolment in Roman colonies, although Roman citizens could acquire Latin status by enrolment in Latin colonies.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 53 (search)
ther in the country around Thurii. Triumvirs were chosen to establish these colonies, whose authority should continue through three years; for the colony among the Brutti, Quintus Naevius, Marcus Minucius Rufus, and Marcus Furius Crassipes; for the colony in the land of Thurium, Aulus Manlius, Quintus Aelius, and Lucius Apustius. These two elections were conducted by the city praetor Gnaeus Domitius on the Capitoline. Several temples were dedicated that year: one to Iuno MatutaIn 197 B.C. (XXXII. xxx. 10) Cornelius vowed a temple to Iuno Sospita. Iuno Matuta seems not to be mentioned elsewhere in classical Latin. in the Forum Olitorium, which had been vowed and contracted for four years before in the Gallic war by the consul Gaius Cornelius, who also, while censor, dedicated it; the second to Faunus; two years earlier the contract for its construction out of the money received as fines had been let out by the aediles Gaius Scribonius and Gnaeus Domitius, the latter of