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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 54 54 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 6 6 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 28-30 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University) 3 3 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 3 3 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 2 2 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh). You can also browse the collection for 200 BC or search for 200 BC in all documents.

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Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 13 (search)
leaving for their provinces, many private citizens, to whom was due this year the third payment on the loans made in the consulship of Marcus Valerius and Marcus Claudius,These citizens, in 210 B.C. (XXVI. xxxvi. 8), loaned money to the state for the prosecution of the war with Hannibal, although from Livy's account they gave rather than loaned the money. In 204 B.C. (XXIX. xvi. 1) an arrangement was made for repayment in three biennial instalments, the third of which would be due in 200 B.C. Nevertheless, a final payment (perhaps to those who did not accept the arrangement described in sects. 6-9 below) was made in 196 B.C. (XXXIII. xlii. 2). appealed to the senate because the consuls had declared that, since the treasury hardly sufficed for the new war, which was to be waged with a great fleet and large armies, there was no money at their command with which to make the payment. The senate could not resist their complaints: If the state wished to use for the Macedonian wa
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 14 (search)
he fleet of Gnaeus Cornelius, he arrived in Macedonia the second day after he set sail from Brundisium. There Athenian ambassadors met him, begging that he release them from siege. He at once sent to Athens Gaius Claudius Cento with twenty warships and a thousand soldiers. ForLivy's elliptical neque enim suggests that if Philip had been before Athens a larger relief expedition would have been necessary. the kingLivy here summarizes the activities of Philip during the campaign of 200 B.C. before the arrival of Sulpicius in the late summer or early autumn of that year. He resumes the narrative dealing with Sulpicius in xxii. 4 below. himself was not conducting the siege of Athens, but was principally occupied with the attack on Abydus,Philip's attack upon this famous city on the Hellespont was part of the aggressive campaign against the Greek cities on the islands and in Asia Minor, some of which were free, while others belonged to the Ptolemies, whose empire he had agreed wi
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 16 (search)
Philip displayed a spirit that more befitted a king.At this point Livy begins the narrative of Philip's campaign of 200 B.C. against the possessions of Ptolemy in Thrace (sects. 3-4) and the Thracian Chersonesus, to the north-west of the Hellespont (sects. 5 ff.). These events precede the arrival of the Romans in Greece (xiv. 2 above). Though he had not withstood Attalus and the Rhodians, he was unterrified even by the threatening war with Rome. Sending Philocles, one of his prefects, with two thousand infantry and two hundred horse to harry the Athenian country, and entrusting a fleet to Heraclides, that he might proceed to Maronea, he himself set out by land to that place with two thousand light-armed infantry and two hundred cavalry. And Maronea, indeed, -B.C. 200 he took at the first assault; Aenus then, after great labour in besieging it, he finally captured through the treachery of Callimedes, the prefect of Ptolemy. Next he occupied other fortresses, Cyps
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 18 (search)
die. Philip, leaving a garrison at Abydus, returned to his kingdom. When, as Hannibal's destruction of Saguntum had aroused the Romans to war against him, so now the slaughter of the people of Abydus had roused them against Philip, word came that the Roman consul was already in Epirus and had sent his army to Apollonia and his fleet to Corcyra to winter.Livy here abandons Polybius and returns to his usual sources, the works of one or more annalists. Since the military year, which began when conditions permitted active operations, the civil year, which began on March 15, and the calendar year did not coincide, Livy has a good deal of difficulty in adjusting his material to his plan of composition. The events related in chaps. xv-xviii preceded Sulpicius' arrival in the east (xiv. 2 above), and we are now ready for his campaign. But since he reached Greece only in time to go into winter quarters, Livy turns aside to narrate events in Rome in the later months of 200 B.C.
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 22 (search)
two thousand of the Romans and allies perished in that battle, most of them from the right squadron, against which at the first attackB.C. 200 the enemy's main effort had been directed. Although the war had been practically ended by the praetor, the consul Gaius Aurelius, having transacted the necessary business in Rome, also set out for Gaul and took over the victorious army from the praetor. The other consul,We return to Greece and continue the narrative of the end of the year 200 B.C. and the following spring, interrupted at chap. xix; cf. the note on xviii. 9 above. having arrived in his province near the end of autumn, was wintering around Apollonia. From the fleet which was moored at Corcyra, Gaius Claudius and the Roman triremes, as has been related, had been sent to Athens, and when they arrived at Piraeus they had inspired great hopes in the allies who were now in despair. For the customary raids on the fields which were made by land from Corinth by way
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 31 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 27 (search)
The consul SulpiciusThe arrival of Sulpicius was recorded in xviii. 9, on which see the note. The events now described may belong to the end of the year 200 B.C. or, more probably, to the following spring. was at that time encamped along the Apsus river between Apollonia and Dyrrachium, and summoning to him there his lieutenant Lucius Apustius he sent him with part of the troops to ravage the enemy's country. Apustius, having plundered the frontiers of Macedonia and having captured at the first assault the towns of Corrhagum, Gerronius and Orgessum, arrived atB.C. 200 Antipatrea, a city situated in a narrow pass. There he first summoned the leading men to a conference and tried to induce them to put themselves under Roman protection; then, when they scorned his suggestions, relying on the size and walls and site of the city, he stormed and captured it by force of arms and killing all the men of military age and giving the booty to the soldiers he tore down the w
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 32 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 4 (search)
PhilipHere Livy resumes his account of Philip's campaign after the defeat of the Aetolians (XXXI. xlii. 9) in the autumn of the year 200 B.C. was at that time besieging Thaumaci with the greatest energy, using terraces and mantlets, and was on the point of using his battering-ram against the walls; but he was compelled to give up his enterprise by the sudden attack of the Aetolians, who, under the command of Archidamus, slipped through the screen of Macedonian patrols into the city, and never, either by night or day, ceased making sallies, now against the Macedonian outposts, now against their siege-works. The nature of the place, -B.C. 199 too, aided them. For Thaumaci lies high above the road as you come from Pylae and the Malian Gulf by way of Lamia, on the very pass, overlooking what they call Hollow Thessaly; the country is rough as you pass through, over roads that wind their way through twisting valleys, and when you reach the city, suddenly the whole pla
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 44 (search)
were taken indiscriminately. Very few of the knights were degraded by the taking away of their horses, nor was severity shown towards any rank. The atrium Libertatis and the villa publicaThese buildings were used by the censors. were rebuilt and enlarged by the same censors. The sacred spring was celebrated and the votive Roman Games performed according to the vow made by Servius Sulpicius Galba.Livy is probably wrong as to the praenomen of Sulpicius, who is probably the consul who, in 200 B.C., vowed games (XXXI. ix. 6-10). While men's minds were intent upon this spectacle, Quintus Pleminius,See XXXI. xii. 2 and the note. who, on account of the many crimes against gods and men which he had committed at Locri, had been thrown into prison, had arranged that men should at night set fire to the city in several places, so that in a state panic-stricken by the disturbance at night the prison might be broken open. This was revealed by the testimony of his accomplices and was
Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh), chapter 53 (search)
ple ten years before, during the Punic war, and as censor he had let the contract.In 204 B.C. (XXIX. xxxvi. 8) P. Sempronius Tuditanus vowed a temple to this Praenestine divinity. Livy's account contains other difficulties, since Tuditanus was censor before he was consul (in 209 B.C.: XXVII. xi. 7), and no P. Sempronius Sophus is known who was consul and censor during this period. Likewise, on the Island, Gaius Servilius the duumvir dedicated a temple to Jupiter; it had been vowed six years before in the Gallic war by the praetor Lucius Furius Purpurio, and contracted for by the same man as consul.In XXXI. xxi. 12 Furius vows a temple to Diiovis during his praetorship in 200 B.C. In XXXV. xli. 8 Livy says that he vowed one temple to Jupiter while praetor and another while consul, and had both built on the Capitoline. These were the events of that year.This sentence has been misplaced, either by Livy or by a scribe, since the following chapter deals with the same year.