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William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 94 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 18 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 38 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Humphreys or search for Humphreys in all documents.

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s found impossible to dislodge him. Rosecrans makes his entire force who participated in this struggle 37,977 infantry, 3,200 cavalry, and 2,223 artillery: total, 43,400 ; and states his; losses as follows: killed, 1,533; Among our killed, beside those already mentioned, were Cols. Jones, 24th Ohio, McKee, 3d Ky., Williams, 25th Ill., Harrington, 27th Ill., Stem, 101st Ohio, and Millikin, 3d Ohio cavalry. Among our wounded, beside those already named, were Cols. Forman, 15th Ky., Humphreys. 88th Ind. Alexander, 21st Ill., Hines, 57th Ind., Blake, 40th Ind., and Lt.-Col. Tanner, 22d Ind. wounded, 7,245; total, 8,778, or fully 20 per cent, of the number engaged. He adds that his provostmarshal says his loss of prisoners will fall below 2,800. He says nothing of prisoners taken by him, though we certainly did take at least 500, beside wounded. He judges that the Rebels had fifteen per cent. advantage in their choice of ground and knowledge of the country; and says that they
columns came within rifle-shot, poured into their faces the deadliest storm of musketry. Howard's division supported the two in advance; while one division of Wilcox's (9th, late Burnside's) corps was detached to maintain communication with Franklin on our left. Hooker's grand division was divided, and in good part sent to reenforce Franklin; while Hooker himself, believing the attack hopeless, required repeated and imperative orders from Burnside to induce him to order an advance; but Humphreys's division was at length thrown out from Fredericksburg, and bore its full part in the front attack, losing heavily. And thus the fight was maintained till after dark — assault after assault being delivered by divisions advancing against twice their numbers, on ground where treble tile force was required for the attack that sufficed for the defense; while a hundred Rebel cannon, posted on heights which our few guns on that side of the river could scarcely reach, and could not effectually
ry charged, the Rebel line swept back on a refluent tide — we regained the lost ground, and every gun just lost in this splendid fight. with heavy loss, and struggling desperately to seize Round Top at his left. Meade regarded this hill as vital to the maintenance of our position, and had already ordered Sykes to advance the 5th corps with all possible haste to save and hold it. A fierce and bloody struggle ensued; for the enemy had nearly carried the hill before Sykes reached it; while Humphreys, who, with one of Sykes's divisions, had been posted in the morning on Sickles's right, was in turn assailed in front and flank, and driven back, with a loss of 2,000 out of 5,000 men. Ultimately, as Sickles's corps fell back in disorder to the ground from which he should not have advanced, Hancock closed in from the right, while parts of the 1st, of the 6th, and a division of the 12th corps, were thrown in on the enemy's front, and they in turn were repelled with loss; falling back to the
erate condition Grant proposes a surrender Humphreys attacks Lee, and is bloodily repulsed Lee rcing Petersburg; when the (Warren's) and 2d (Humphreys's) corps moved quietly out March 29. soute accumulation of supplies at City Point. Humphreys crossed Hatcher's run at the Vaughan road; w intrenchments covering the White Oak road. Humphreys — moving in an extended line, over a denselyous attempts by Miles, Mott, and Hays, under Humphreys's orders, to penetrate it at different point pressing on Petersburg from the west; while Humphreys, farther to our left, with Hays's and Mott'ss depot; where he was about to attack when Gen. Humphreys came up and reclaimed Miles's division: whonfronted Miles. But Miles, ere this, under Humphreys's order, had dislodged and defeated his anta not consumed, when the van of our 2d corps (Humphreys's)--which had now taken the lead — rushed up column could only advance at a heavy cost. Humphreys attempted to turn the enemy's flank, but fou[3 more...]<
rg, 345; his corps routed by Jackson at Chancellorsville. 357; at Gettysburg, 380 to 387; in the Atlanta campaign. 626; with Sherman in his great march from Atlanta to Savannah, 689 to 695; advances on Columbia, S. C., 700. Howe, Gen. A. P., at Chancellorsville, 363; his narrative of the pursuit of Lee, 390; his testimony in relation to Gen. Meade, 402. Huger, Gen. (Rebel), at Seven Pines, 143; his position in front of Richmond, 160; is present at the battle of Malvern Hill. 165. Humphreys, Gen., at Vicksburg, 345; at Gettysburg, 382 to 387; at Farmville, 742. Hunter, Gen., his order on Slavery annulled by the President. 246-7: he defeats W. E. Jones at Piedmont, 600: miscarries at Lynchburg, 601; is succeeded in command by Gen. Sheridan. 607. Hurlbut, Gen., 59, 64; at Corinth, 230. I. Imboden, Gen., captures Charlestown, Va., 396. Immell's battery, at Iuka, 224. Independence, Mo., garrison at, captured, 36. Indiana, Morgan's raid into, 405. Indian