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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 94 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 18 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 38 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 33 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Humphreys or search for Humphreys in all documents.

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ly ordered to attack with his whole force, and I hoped before sundown to have broken through the enemy's line. This order was not carried out. At four P. M. General Humphreys was directed to attack, General Sykes' division moving in support of Humphreys' right. All these men fought with determined courage, but without success. GHumphreys' right. All these men fought with determined courage, but without success. General Humphreys was conspicuous for his gallantry throughout the action. Our forces had been repulsed at all points, and it was necessary to look upon the day's work as a failure. It is not pleasant to dwell upon these results even at this distance of time, and I have, therefore, been thus brief in my statement of them. FroGeneral Humphreys was conspicuous for his gallantry throughout the action. Our forces had been repulsed at all points, and it was necessary to look upon the day's work as a failure. It is not pleasant to dwell upon these results even at this distance of time, and I have, therefore, been thus brief in my statement of them. From the night of the thirteenth until the night of the fifteenth, our men held their positions. Something was done in the way of intrenching, and some angry skirmishing and annoying artillery firing was indulged in in the meantime. I directed preparations to be made for another attack on the morning of the fourteenth, but, for re
ps, from left to right, was as follows: Sheridan, Warren, Humphreys, Ord, Wright, Parke. Everything looked favorable to th but repulsed it easily, capturing about one hundred men. Humphreys reached Dabney's mill, and was pushing on when last heardt, was directed to hold on where he was and fortify. General Humphreys drove the enemy from his front into his main line on the other. Preparations were at once made to relieve General Humphreys' corps, to report to General Sheridan, but the condit. Soon after, receiving a report from General Meade that Humphreys could hold our position on the Boydton road, and that thending of Warren, because of his accessibility, instead of Humphreys, as was intended, and pre-cipitated intended movements. treat. To guard against this, General Miles' division of Humphreys' corps was sent to reinforce him, and a bombardment was cf the enemy on that side of them in Petersburg, while General Humphreys pushed forward with two divisions and joined General
ed above his boots, his hands limp, his coat in confusion, his sword equipments, sprawling on the ground; not even the weight of sleep erasing that persistent expression of the lip which held a constant promise of something to be done. And there at the foot of another tree, is General Meade--a military hat, with the rim turned down about his ears, tapping a scabbard with his fingers, and gazing abstractedly into the depths of the earth through eye-glasses that should become historic. General Humphreys, Chief of Staff--a spectacled, iron-gray, middle-aged officer, of a pleasant smile and manner, who wears his trowsers below after the manner of leggins, and is in all things independent and serene, paces yonder to and fro. That rather thick-set officer, with closely trimmed whiskers, and the kindest of eyes, who never betrays a harsh impatience to any comer, is Adjutant-General Williams. General Hunt, Chief of Artillery, a hearty-faced, frank-handed man, whose black hair and whiskers h
isions of the Twenty-fourth corps. Major-General Humphreys, commanding the Second corps, was dirrs were duly executed, and by evening Major-General Humphreys was in position, his right resting ne During the night of the thirtieth, Major-General Humphreys, who had intrenched his line, was dirupport of Major-General Sheridan, and Major-General Humphreys advised of the intended attacks of theneral Wright's success was reported, Major-General Humphreys was ordered to advance with the remail of his trains. Before reaching this point Humphreys had detached Barlow's division to the left tyed the bridge. On learning the position of Humphreys, orders were sent to Wright to cross and attgave him permission, but about this time General Humphreys came up, and, receiving notice from General Meade that General Humphreys would take command of Miles' division, I relinquished it at once, fore ordered an advance, sending word to General Humphreys, who was on the road to our right, and r[10 more...]