hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 56 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 8 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Lafayette or search for Lafayette in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 7 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
is formed of alternate diamonds of cherry and beech, and kept polished as highly as if it were of fine mahogany. Here are the best pictures of the collection. Over the fireplace is the Laughing and Weeping Philosophers, dividing the world between them; on its right, the earliest navigators to America,—Columbus, Americus Vespuccius, Magellan, etc.,—copied, Mr. Jefferson said, from originals in the Florence Gallery. Farther round, Mr. Madison in the plain, Quaker-like dress of his youth, Lafayette in his Revolutionary uniform, and Franklin in the dress in which we always see him. There were other pictures, and a copy of Raphael's Transfiguration. We conversed on various subjects until dinner-time, and at dinner were introduced to the grown members of his family. These are his only remaining child, Mrs. Randolph, her husband, Colonel Randolph, and the two oldest of their unmarried children, Thomas Jefferson and Ellen; and I assure you I have seldom met a pleasanter party. The
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
s explained a few pages farther on. with the police from the secretary of our legation (to whom I had sent a note upon it), called on me this morning, d la Francaise, to express their regret, etc., and asked me to dine, at Mad. de Stael's, with Lafayette. Nobody else was there; for Mad. de Stael on the whole grows worse, and the family do not like to see much company, though they still invite some, lest she should be alarmed more than her situation will bear. The dinner was very sad. LafayettLafayette asked the Duchess some questions about her mother, but it was more than she could bear, and she was obliged to leave the table. The General himself—who is one of the most kind-hearted men in the world—was hardly less affected at finding he had unconsciously gone too far. . . . . I was indeed glad when the dinner was ended. June 16.—M. Villemain, of the Academy of Paris Faculty of Letters, is so famous an instructor that I have long intended to hear him, but have been prevented until this <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
ttach my affections. Two of those who have seemed to take the most interest in me, and whose kindness I shall never forget,—the Duke de Broglie and Auguste de Stael,—proposed to me to accompany them to La Grange, where they were to visit General Lafayette, without company. The General had often invited me to visit him, and as his chateau is not far from the route I was to follow to Switzerland I accompanied them. I was much touched this morning by the Duke's kindness, in having asked M. aracter, she hardly attempts to conceal. Coming with persons I knew so well, and to an establishment where everything is arranged as if on purpose for the most open hospitality, I soon felt, as it were, at home. It is impossible to know General Lafayette in Paris and the world without feeling respect for his enthusiasm of character, his unalterable honesty, and his open simplicity; but it is impossible to see him in the country, in his home and in his family, without loving him. He is now s
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
Paris, Mad. de Broglie made a little dinner-party for me, to which she asked Humboldt, Forbin, De Pradt, The Abbe de Pradt, who, as Mr. Ticknor elsewhere says, of all others in French society, is said to have the most esprit in conversation. Lafayette, and two or three other persons, whom I was very glad to see before leaving Paris. It happened too to be Monday night, and therefore I passed the remainder of the evening in her salon, upon which my latest recollections of Paris rest, for I leAs you are going away so soon, you will not, I trust, feel it much of a sacrifice. Of course I gave her the promise and kept it, although I should much have liked to tell the whole conversation at the De Broglies', where I dined with Humboldt, Lafayette, and De Pradt the same evening, and who would have enjoyed it prodigiously. But the first house at which I dined in England was Lord Holland's, where I met Tierney, Mackintosh, and some other of the leading Whigs, to whom I told it amidst grea
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
came from him, written in English, so nearly perfect that it is given here exactly from the autograph. Coppet, August 10, 1825. my dear Ticknor,—It is an object of most sincere regret to me, that it was not in my power to be of any use to your friends in Paris, and to express to them the gratitude and friendship which I feel for you. Your kind letter reached me here a few days ago, and I had left Paris about the middle of June. Nothing can be more striking than your observations on Lafayette's journey, and your picture of the five living Presidents. I read it with tears in my eyes, for after religion, there is nothing that penetrates so deep into the heart of man as the love of freedom. Yours is, indeed, a noble and blessed country, and the whole of America—when she gets rid of the Brazilian Emperor, which is only an unnecessary piece of ridicule—will present an unexampled scene of grandeur, wealth, and reason. But for God's sake keep your eyes open upon your slave States. <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
ather. marriage. domestic life. visits. Chancellor Kent. General Lafayette. winter in Washington and Virginia. The two years succeedncy, was at last extinguished of itself. In August, 1824, General Lafayette returned, after an interval of thirty-eight years, to revisitench. In a letter to Mr. Ticknor dated Paris, March, 1826, General Lafayette says: A publication that has a claim to my deep and affectione in his home at La Grange. He had the pleasure of receiving General Lafayette, more than once, as his guest, and after one of these occasiowever, at a very pleasant dinner of only a dozen, that he gave to Lafayette, when the old gentleman made himself very agreeable; but this wass in 1815. Mr. King, General Bernard, the Edward Livingstons, General Lafayette, etc. These dinners were as pleasant as anything of the sort course of this visit in Washington, Mr. Ticknor was asked by General Lafayette to interest himself in discovering and assisting two German r
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
437. Kent, James, Chancellor, 338-340, 380. Kenyon, John, 411 and note, 418. Kenyon, Mrs., John, 456. Kestner, Charlotte Buff, 78. King, Rufus, 350, 351. Kingsley, Professor, 14. Kirkland, President of Harvard College, letters to, 321-323, 332, 355, 360, 368. Klopstock, F. G., 125. Knapp, Professor, 112, 113. Krause of Weisstropp, 476. L Laboucheri, Henry (Lord Taunton), 408, 411. La Carolina, 223. Lacerda, 246, 247, 249. Lacretelle, Charles, 133-135, 139. Lafayette, General Marquis de, 139, 143, 161, 152, 155, 257, 263, 344 and note, 350, 351. La Fontaine, Auguste, 112. Lagrange, visits, 151, 152. La Granja. See St. Ildefonso. Lamartine, A. de, 470 note. Lamb, Charles, 294. Lansdowne, Marchioness of, 413, 415. Lansdowne, Marquess of, 263, 264, 430. La Place, Marquis de, 255. Lardner, Dr., Dionysius, 425 and note. Lauderdale, Lord, 264. Lausanne, visits, 152, 155. Laval, Montmorency, Duc Adrien de, 128, 137, 188, 189,