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The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1863., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 14 4 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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The army has been lying here now nearly six months. It has of late been kept pretty busy. Sunday morning inspections, monthly inspections of troops, frequent inspections of arms and ammunition, innumerable drills, and constant picketing. Colonel Miller assumes command of a brigade in Johnson's division. Since the troops were at Nashville he has been commanding what was known as the Second Brigade of Negley's division; but the colonels of the brigade objected to having an imported colonel placed over them, and so Miller takes command of the brigade to which his regiment is attached. He is a brave man and a good officer. Colonel Harker's brigade has been relieved from duty at the fortifications, and is now encamped near us, on the Liberty road. June, 21 Mrs. Colonel Scribner and Mrs. Colonel Griffin stopped at my tent-door for a moment this morning. They were on horseback, and each had a child on the saddle. They were giving Mrs. Scribner's children a little ride. Att
little while — I am perishing for sleep. And with these words the General proceeded to a haystack near the road, pulled down some of the hay, wrapped himself in his cape, and in a few minutes was fast asleep-his companion exactly imitating him. At daylight we reached the straggling little village of Dover, where more prisoners were paroled; thence proceeded through a fine country towards Carlisle; at Dillstown procured dinner from the landlord of the principal tavern, a philosophic Mr. Miller, whose walls were covered with pictures of black trotters in skeleton conveyances, making rapid time; and at night reached Carlisle, which General Stuart immediately summoned to surrender by flag of truce. The reply to this was a flat refusal from General Smith; and soon a Whitworth gun in the town opened, and the Southern guns replied. This continued for an hour or two, when the U. S. barracks were fired, and the light fell magnificently upon the spires of the city, presenting an exq
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the enemy would throw himself against our shattered ranks and try to crush us. I sent my staff officers to the rear to assist in rallying the troops, and hurried to our line of batteries, as the only support that I could give them, knowing that my presence would impress upon every one of them the necessity of holding the ground to the last extremity. I knew if the army was to be saved, those batteries must check the enemy. As I rode along the line of artillery, I observed my old friend Captain Miller, Washington Artillery, of Sharpsburg record, walking between his guns and smoking his pipe as quietly and contentedly as he could at his camp-fire. The enemy's skirmishers were then advancing and threatening assault. For unaccountable reasons, the enemy did not pursue his advantage. Our army was soon in compact shape, and its face turned once more toward Virginia. I may mention here that it has been absurdly said that General Lee ordered me to put Hood's and McLaws' Divisions in supp
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
Rogers, were deployed, dismounted, to the left in the open fields, and another squadron of the same regiment, under Captain Miller, deployed, mounted, to the extreme right of the whole line, along the edge of the woods covering the cross-road, abovforces. In the meantime, the enemy attempted to force our lines on the right, but their charge was gallantly repulsed by Miller's squadron of the Third Pennsylvania, and Hart's squadron of the First New Jersey, in the woods. The enemy having filand sharing the excitement of the moment, rushed in, by the side of Treichel and Rogers, at the head of the little band. Miller, whose squadron of the Third Pennsylvania was already mounted, and had rallied, fired a volley from the woods on the righlittle band was killed or wounded, although some succeeded in cutting their way clear through. Almost at the same moment Miller, with his squadron of the Third Pennsylvania, struck the left flank about two-thirds of the way down the column. Going t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Death of General John H. Morgan. (search)
h of himself was owing to the fact that he had ridden his troops very rapidly; they were worn out, and the pickets on the east side of the town fell asleep. Colonel Miller, who was posted near Bull's gap, did not know of the presence of Morgan in that part of the country until six P. M., September 3d. It is said that a woman br recent visit to Greenville, those having personal knowledge of the matter denied that there was a woman in it. But, however this may be, when the news came, Colonel Miller and General Gilliam held a short consultation, and the command was ordered to be in readiness to move. At eleven o'clock that night, in the midst of a terribn, many wagons, and prisoners, and, in fact, virtually broke up Morgan's command. The forces engaged on the Union side were the Thirteenth Tennessee Cavalry, Colonel Miller; Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, Colonel Brownlow, and Tenth Michigan, Major Newell. So complete was the surprise and rout of Morgan's command that the Federal loss
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
ral Wright were also borne from the field wounded. General Lee says that heavy masses of the enemy again moved forward, being opposed by only four pieces of artillery, supported by a few hundreds of men rallied by General D. H. Hill, being parts of Walker's and R. H. Anderson's commands. Colonel John R. Cook, with the Twenty-seventh North Carolina, stood boldly in line without a cartridge. The firm front presented by this small force, and the well-directed fire of the artillery under Captain Miller of the Washington Artillery, and Captain Boyce's South Carolina Battery, checked the progress of the enemy, and in about an hour and a half he retired. Longstreet states that the only troops there were Cook's regiment, and that as he rode along he saw two pieces of Washington Artillery, but that there were not enough men to man them, and that he put his staff officers to work the guns, while he held their horses. During the battle McClellan held Fitz John Porter's corps, twelve thou
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 12: the negro as a soldier. (search)
h her shy little girl clinging to her skirts. Fanny was a modest little mulatto woman, a soldier's wife, and a company laundress. She had escaped from the main-land in a boat, with that child and another. Her baby was shot dead in her arms, and she reached our lines with one child safe on earth and the other in heaven. I never found it needful to give any elementary instructions in courage to Fanny's husband, you may be sure. There was another family of brothers in the regiment named Miller. Their grandmother, a fine-looking old woman, nearly seventy, I should think, but erect as a pine-tree, used sometimes to come and visit them. She and her husband had once tried to escape from a plantation near Savannah. They had failed, and had been brought back; the husband had received five hundred lashes, and while the white men on the plantation were viewing the punishment, she was collecting her children and grandchildren, to the number of twenty-two, in a neighboring marsh, prepara
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
e, W. H., Lt., 76, 271. Jackson, A. W., Capt., 73, 76,270, 271, 272. James, William, Capt., 84, 170, 270. Johnston, J. F., Lt., 271. Jones, Lt., 76, 81. Kemble, Mrs., 67, 274. Kennon, Clarence, Corp., 275. King, T. B., 67. Lambkin, Prince, Corp, 109. Lincoln, Abraham, Pres., 23, 34, 252. Long, Thomas, Corp., 256. Manning, B. I., Lt., 272. McIntyre, I., Sergt., 71, 72, 252. Meeker, L., Maj., 117, 122. Merriam, E. C., apt., 270, 271. Metcalf, L. W., Capt., 71, 73, 84, 270. Miller family, 247. Minor, T. T., Surg., 73, 269. Mitchell, O. M., Gen., 276. Montgomery, James, Col., 104,107 115, 126, 127, 169, 277. Moses, Acting Master, 68. O'Neil, J. B., Lt., 271. Osborne, Lt., 231. Parker, C. E., Lt., 271. Parker, N. G., Capt., 270, 271, 27 Parsons, William, 75. Phillips, Wendell, 112, 249. Pomeroy, J., Lt., 271. Randolph, W. J., Capt., 114 270. Rivers, Prince, Sergt., 41, 57, 51 89,261, 265. Robbins, E. W., Capt., 270, 271, Roberts, Samuel, 243. Rogers,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
se the enemy would throw himself against our shattered ranks and try to crush us. I sent my staff officers to the rear to assist in rallying the troops, and hurried to our line of batteries as the only support that I could give them, knowing that my presence would impress upon every one of them the necessity of holding the ground to the last extremity. I knew if the army was to be saved those batteries must check the enemy. As I rode along the line of artillery I observed my old friend Captain Miller, Washington Artillery, of Sharpsburg record, walking between his guns and smoking his pipe as quietly and contentedly as he could at his campfire. The enemy's skirmishers were then advancing and threatening assault. For unaccountable reasons the enemy did not pursue his advantage. Our army was soon in compact shape, and its face turned once more toward Virginia. I may mention here that it has been absurdly said that General Lee ordered me to put Hood's and McLaws' divisions in suppor
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
and the victory of Lake Erie formed a brilliant termination to the campaign in that quarter. Had such victories been gained on the Montreal or eastern portion of the frontier, they would have led to the most important results. The plan of operations for the campaign of 1814 was of the same diverse and discordant character as before. But the command of the troops had now fallen into the hands of young and energetic officers; and Brown, assisted by such men as Wood, McCrea, Scott, Ripley, Miller, soon gained the victories of Fort Erie, Chippewa, and Lundy's Lane; while McComb and McDonough drove back the enemy from the line of Lake Champlain. With these operations terminated the Northern campaign of 1814, the last which has been conducted on that frontier. Let us now turn to the system of works projected for the defence of this line. The first works are at the Falls of St. Mary, on the western extremity of the line. The second works are at Mackinaw. The third works are
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